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ARCHIVE: TCP-IP Distribution List - Archives (1994)
DOCUMENT: TCP-IP Distribution List for November 1994 (751 messages, 399642 bytes)
SOURCE: http://securitydigest.org/exec/display?f=tcp-ip/archive/1994/11.txt&t=text/plain
NOTICE: securitydigest.org recognises the rights of all third-party works.

START OF DOCUMENT

-----------[000000][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 1 Nov 1994 02:21:26 GMT
From:      ken@syd.dit.CSIRO.AU (Ken Yap)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   DHCP for Unix

Are there any free implementations of a DHCP server for Unix
platforms?  Specifically SunOS or Solaris but any BSD lineage OS will
do.

(DHCP: see RFC1541)

-----------[000001][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 02:41:55 GMT
From:      ksb@po.CWRU.Edu (Kevin S. Brisson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Virtual IP addressing?


Currently, I'm working on a small project where I'd
like to have 2 connection oriented gateways handle
multiple remote connections.  I would like to have
the gateways perform automatic load balancing.  Being
new to the world of TCP/IP, I'm wondering if the concept
of virtual addressing is available.  Physically, I'd
like to issue the terminal connect to one virtual
address and have only one of the gateways respond to
the SYN.  Is it possible to have each gateway configured
as a router with identical loopback addresses?  This way
through routing protocols, the load balancing could be 
achieved.  I realize this is odd since these gateways are
connection oriented unlike typical routere.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Kevin

-- 

-----------[000002][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 94 03:05:34 GMT
From:      irving@sys.toronto.edu (Irving Reid)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.ultrix
Subject:   Problems with PPP 2.1.2 on Ultrix

I'm trying to use the PPP 2.1.2 distribution between a pair of DECStation
5000/133s running Ultrix 4.3.  I'm having two problems.

First, setting the speed to 38400 makes the systems unable to talk to
each other.  It seems like one or the other is running at the wrong baud
rate, but I haven't been able to prove it yet.

The second and much bigger problem is that at any other speed, the PPP
link comes up and works for a while and then one end or the other panics
with a "tlbmiss on invalid kernel page".  Others here are running the
same kernel on the same hardware, talking to MacPPP at 38400 baud with
no problems.  I've tried various packet sizes and turned VJ compression
on and off, but no luck so far.

 - irving -

-----------[000003][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 15:06:33 -0500
From:      rrwood@io.org (Roy Wood)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SLIP (and TCP/IP stack) Implementation

In article <393796$bfn@tools.near.net>,
Barry Margolin <barmar@nic.near.net> wrote:
>The upcoming "TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 2" is a description of the TCP/IP
>implementation in BSD Unix.

Look forward to it...

>>Now, assuming that I have a library of routines to let me talk to my
>>ethernet card, how easy would it be to persuade the TCP/IP stack to talk
>>to both the ethercard and the SLIP driver (not simultaneously!)?
>
>That should be very straightforward.  You should implement a
>device-independent interface between the IP layer and the device driver.
>When the IP routing routine selects an interface it will just call the
>appropriate interface routine.  The above references should illustrate
>this.

What about using a packet-driver interface for the device dependent
part?  The docs look pretty simple, and there are lots of packet
drivers out there, so it seems like a decent "standard."  

Then again, what about NDIS?

-Roy



-----------[000004][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 1 Nov 1994 09:02:39 GMT
From:      J.J.Keijser@fys.ruu.nl (J.J. Keijser)
To:        comp.sys.novell,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.nfs
Subject:   Re: NFS and IPX same time: Can u help?

>In article <52481221@p7003bj.ppp.lrz-muenchen.de>, 
 
>> I want to access NFS and use the IPX interface at the same time[..] The
>> IPX interface should be compatible to IPXODI, so I can run games
>> like Doom without compatibility problems.

Use NFSODI.SYS and ODI stacks. Hope this helps,

JJ

-----------[000005][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 1 Nov 1994 11:04:36
From:      pfreeman@WichitaKS.NCR.COM
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Recovering from client crashes

I am interested in finding out how common servers which use TCP as the
underlying transport protocol, such as FTP and Telnet, recover if the remote
client terminates before closing the connection.

More specificially, I am writing a client/server application and would like
to use TCP rather than UDP in order to avoid dealing with timeouts and
retransmissions on the client side. However, my server needs to be
able to recover resources allocated to a connection (such as sockets,
memory buffers which I allocate, etc.) should a remote client crash while
it has a conneciton open to the server.

The application I am working on is a video file server (playout of MPEG data
streams over ATM connections), but the control for these different video
streams (start, pause, resume, get directory of videos, etc.) is over an
Ethernet network. Thus a client may issue several requests during the
lifetime of a video stream, but these requests will be fairly infrequent.
For each request, the server will issue an immediate response.

Thus one possibility is to use TCP but have each connection exist only for
the duration of a single request/response transaction. For example, when
a client wants to pause a video stream which it previously started, it
would establish a new TCP connection for this command only.

Another possibility is to implement a periodic "I'm alive" heartbeat message
exchanged between client and server.

Another possibility is to switch to UDP.

So, my questions are:

1. How do other application layer protocols that sit on top of TCP solve the
problem of a client crashing before a connection is terminated?

2. Are there any other ways besides those I listed above of accomplishing
this?

3. Does anyone have any good suggestions from their own experience on
this issue?

Thanks to all.

Paul Freeman
Paul.Freeman@wichitaKs.ncr.com



-----------[000006][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 17:56:02 -0500
From:      rdippold@qualcomm.com (Ron "Asbestos" Dippold)
To:        news.announce.newgroups,news.groups,comp.client-server,comp.os.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.os2.networking.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.osf.misc,comp.unix.osf.osf1
Subject:   2nd CFV: comp.soft-sys.dce

                          LAST CALL FOR VOTES (of 2)
                     unmoderated group comp.soft-sys.dce

Newsgroups line:
comp.soft-sys.dce       The Distributed Computing Environment (DCE).

Votes must be received by 23:59:59 UTC, 9 November 1994.

This vote is being conducted by a neutral third party.  For voting
questions only contact rdippold@qualcomm.com.  For questions about the
proposed group contact Craig Weeks <weeks@dss1.austin.ibm.com>


CHARTER

The newsgroup comp.soft-sys.dce is intended for discussions of any and
all DCE implementations and applications across all hardware platforms
and operating system.  The topics to be discussed include (but are not
limited to) the following:

   - Porting DCE applications between platforms
   - Configuring DCE cells
   - Installation of DCE
   - DCE performance
   - Network transport questions
   - Suggestions for future enhancements
   - Success Stories
   - Application development tools


HOW TO VOTE

Send MAIL to:   voting@qualcomm.com
Just Replying should work if you are not reading this on a mailing list.

Your mail message should contain one of the following statements:
      I vote YES on comp.soft-sys.dce
      I vote NO on comp.soft-sys.dce

You may also ABSTAIN in place of YES/NO - this will not affect the outcome.
Anything else may be rejected by the automatic vote counting program.  The
votetaker will respond to your received ballots with a personal acknowledge-
ment by mail - if you do not receive one within several days, try again.
It's your responsibility to make sure your vote is registered correctly.

One vote counted per person, no more than one per account. Addresses and
votes of all voters will be published in the final voting results list.



comp.soft-sys.dce Bounce List - No need to revote
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
beal@owgmail.endicott.ibm.com                                                 
eliot@siac.com                                                 Eliot M Solomon
hethmon@APAC12.AG.UTK.EDU                                                     
hlee@austin.ibm.com                                                  Henry Lee
jpimentel@nectech.com                                                         
mauney@jtec.mauney.com                                              Jon Mauney
multitec@insosf1.infonet.net                                                  
rick@bcm.tmc.edu                                             Richard H. Miller
Saint@phoebus.cs.ncku.edu.tw                                                  
swgate2!finmail1!WC6693@rutgers.edu                                           

-----------[000007][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 12:15:13 GMT
From:      atkinson@sundance.itd.nrl.navy.mil (Ran Atkinson)
To:        comp.protocols.misc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Resource Reservation.

In article <393di3$7du@newsflash.concordia.ca> andrew@gmvt4.concordia.ca (Andrew Francis) writes:
>   I have heard the term "resource reservation" connected to the design
>of new versions of IP. What exactly is it and where can I find references
>on it. Thank you in advance.

The Resource Reservation work you ask about is not limited to IPv6, in
fact IPv4 implementations of it already exist.  The protocol is called
"RSVP".  See the Internet Drafts archive site near you to look at a
recent copy of the draft specification.  Also see IEEE Network
magazine's September 1993 issue for an article on RSVP.

Ran
atkinson@itd.nrl.navy.mil



-----------[000008][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 94 15:05:42
From:      billw@glare.cisco.com (William )
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Putting school network on Internet via SLIP

Putting 100 real-time (WWW, ftp, gopher, telnet) users behind a SLIP
link is a recipe for disaster.  Consider limiting the number of concurrent
interactive internet users to less than 10, and/or some kind of "batching"
that prevents the need for all 100 systems to access the internet directly.
A single slip link can handle a LOT of non-interactive traffic (mail, news.)
Probably even enough for 100 users, but that's cause it gets spread out over
all the hours in the day, rather than just the hours of interactive use.

I wonder if the Mosaic people are working on "www spoofing" and proxy
agents, to solve problems like this.  It would certainly be nice to be able
to specify a set of www trees to keep "current" on a local server, and have
them automatically cached on a local proxy server...

BillW


-----------[000009][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 14:07:34 GMT
From:      john@iastate.edu (John Hascall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

Paul Hethmon <hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu> wrote:
}I'm currently writing a ftp server and had a question about the
}interpretation of RFC 959.
}
}Under the NLST command (page 33), the RFC states 
}
}  "The server will return a stream of names of files 
}    and no other information."
}
}I know of two interpretations of this. One is the standard Unix
}implemented style like wu-ftpd which also includes directories
}as files. The other does not include directories in the reply.

   In my opinion, the practice of using "ls" for NLST
   is in violation of the standard.  For example (just
   done from the command line here):

   % ls a* | cat
   abc:                     <--- funny I don't recall a colon on this filename
   README
   abc.ps.Z
   abc.tar.Z
   assembler.ps.Z
                            <--- that's an odd filename
   afs-kerb:
   Makefile
     :
   (etc)


}Anyone like to offer an opinion either way? I'm planning on
}including directories since in most cases they're considered
}"special files", but I think the point could be made in the 
}other direction.

   My interpretation was to return:

      abc/abc.tar.Z
      abc/abc.ps.Z
      abc/README
      abc/assembler.ps.Z
      afs-kerb/Makefile
          :

John
-- 
John Hascall                   ``An ill-chosen word is the fool's messenger.''

Systems Software Engineer, ISU Comp Center  +  Ames, IA  50011  +  515/294-9551
& Hascall Systems - Unix/C/Internet Consulting, Training, Custom Programming

-----------[000010][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 22:37:43 -0500
From:      stos@titan.ucs.umass.edu (stos)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   diff between passive and active mode ftp


Could someone tell me the difference between Passive and active mode
ftp?

thanks
-stos



-----------[000011][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 14:53:59 GMT
From:      jrichard@cs.uml.edu (John Richardson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SLIP and MTU

In article <391h23$9vo@network.ucsd.edu>,
Jon Kay <jkay@rossano.ucsd.edu> wrote:
>>Unless background FTSs etc knacker the interactive performance by sending
>>huge packets that delay your keystroke echo.
>
>(FTPs, I presume?)
>This actually turns out to usually be a function of TCP window size.
>It doesn't much matter how big the MTU is if TCP puts gobs of packets
>out at the same time - your poor little telnet packet is still stuck
>behind the entire TCP window's worth of data.
>
>This changes if both your machine and your WAN<->LAN gateway(s)
>support IP TOS queuing, but that's not really all that common yet
>(especially in end hosts).  It is getting more common - in another
>year or so things may have changed.

Even on systems that support TOS queuing you may not get good
response during ftp sessions if your modem has send/receive
buffers! I guess most modems have these buffers.  I know my
supra does.  I typically get one to two second delays when
ftping files unless I close the tcp window.

I spent 2 weeks figuring, reasoning, and looking at code to
make sure this is likely to be correct.  I hope I'm right.
However, I'd appreciate it if someone proves me wrong.

You get the interactive lag during ftp in every winsock I've
tried and in linux.  Both sides of the link support TOS.

--
John Richardson
jrichard@cs.uml.edu

-----------[000012][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 1 Nov 1994 15:35:31 GMT
From:      lierman@ssd.comm.mot.com (Ken Lierman)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP! Problem when client closes

Leo,

Well, my problem was that I was not checking the return value of recv for 
a zero length.  When I did this and had the server close the socket when a zero
length message was received, that fixed it.  I suppose it could happen in reverse
if the server went away and the client was still trying to receive messages..

Ken

-----------[000013][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      01 Nov 1994 15:38:19 GMT
From:      nelson@crynwr.crynwr.com (Russell Nelson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: PC based PD Ethernet/TCPIP sniffer?

In article <CyE3J8.7C@lehman.com> mbassman@lehman.com writes:

   Title says it all.  Anybody know of one?  I've already chased down
   the leads for that foreign product alternately named 'fergie',
   'gobbler', and at least one name that escapes me right now.  That
   product is aimed at packet measurement - not decode.

Mmmm, there hasn't been a lot of work on a free packet decoder for
PCs.  Someone might port tcpdump if they get bored.  The best decoder
is netwatch, which hasn't been updated in at least four years.  Look
on netlab1.usu.edu for pcip96.zip.

--
-russ <nelson@crynwr.com>    http://www.crynwr.com/crynwr/nelson.html
Crynwr Software   | Crynwr Software sells packet driver support | ask4 PGP key
11 Grant St.      | +1 315 268 1925 (9201 FAX)  | What is thee doing about it?
Potsdam, NY 13676 | LPF member - ask me about the harm software patents do.

-----------[000014][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 16:33:57 GMT
From:      dthompso@dirtnap.wellfleet.com (David Thompson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: where to find ethernet multicast addresses ?

In article <mkl.783190309@whoopi>, mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de (Mario Klebsch DG1AM) writes:
|> Hello!
|> 
|> I am loocking for the meaning of the ethernet addresses used for multicast.
|> I configured a bridge to block a lot of ethernet multicast addresses, but
|> I don't know, what the effect will be. So here is the question:
|> 
|> 	Does anybody know, where I can find out the meaning of addresses
|> 	like 9:0:77:0:0:1. This address is marked as multicast by SunOS 5.3's
|> 	snoop.
|> 
|> Thank you in advance,
|> 
|> 	Mario
|> --
|> Mario Klebsch, DG1AM, mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de		+49 531 / 391 - 7457
|> Institut fuer Robotik und Prozessinformatik der TU Braunschweig
|> Hamburger Strasse 267, 38114 Braunschweig, Germany

Try RFC1700 "ASSIGNED NUMBERS" - it has a large section on Ethernet Addressing.

-- dthompso@baynetworks.com




-----------[000015][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 1 Nov 1994 16:50:21 GMT
From:      hooker@comm.mot.com (James Hooker)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Question: Who is using these UDP ports?

I need a liitle help solving a problem. I have some in-house programs
which use TCP/IP (UDP mode) socket connections to communicate with
each other. I use a set of self assigned port numbers (1186 - 1194 to
be exact) to which the sockets get "bind"ed to. These programs were working
fine until recently. Now sometimes I get errors "bind: address already in use".
Using netstat -a, I can see that some of the port numbers are surely in use prior
to starting my programs.

netstat -a
udp          0        0   *.1191                 *.*
udp          0        0   *.1193                 *.*

My question is, who is using these ports? How can I get the process ID of
the tasks which have already latched on to the port numbers which I want?
Is there some unix utility which will show this or is there some way to
do it with socket calls?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Jim


-----------[000016][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 17:26:56 GMT
From:      bob@comlab.gtri.gatech.edu (Bob Baggerman)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: CSU/DSU vendors? (Is this the right place for this?)

Faux Joe writes:
>My company is asking me to find a CSU/DSU for our imminent 56Kb fiber
>connection.

If you have a Mosaic viewer you might want to browse network hardware
vendors listed on "http://www.bizweb.com/" under the "network.hardware"
heading.  There are a number of vendors that have on-line product info
available via Mosaic.

bob

-- 
Bob Baggerman                    ! bob.baggerman@gtri.gatech.edu
GTRI/ITTL/CND                    ! bob@comlab.gtri.gatech.edu
Georgia Tech Research Institute  ! 404-894-7100 or 404-894-3525
Atlanta, GA  30332  USA          !

-----------[000017][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 20:43:40 GMT
From:      maf@net.ohio-state.edu (Mark A. Fullmer)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: dynamic ip addresses

In article <3927mr$av8@tools.near.net> barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin) writes:
>In article <3924o8$giu@juniper.almaden.ibm.com> trall@almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall) writes:
>>How will you know when a dynamically assigned address is no longer

[..]

>Send out a few ARPs for the address.  If they get no responses, the address
>is available.
 
>This is essentially how Appletalk node assignment works.  When an Appletalk
>device starts up it selects a candidate node number.  It sends out a
>broadcast asking whether the number is in use, and if it hears no response
>to grabs it, otherwise it tries another number.

Appletalk is designed to do this though, IP/ARP isn't.  This probably works
fine in a small environment, but if you add hosts that do this to a 
network full of hosts that don't, you're bound to end up with one of the
dynamic machines using an IP address assigned statically -- bridges, hubs, or
hosts rebooting would give the dynamic hosts a false indication of when
an IP address was not in use.

-- 
mark
maf+@osu.edu

-----------[000018][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      1 Nov 1994 23:21:39 GMT
From:      panther@athena.mit.edu (Brent M Phillips)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   User-Mode TCP???

Does anyone out there know where I could find sources for a TCP that runs in
user-mode? I'm sure it exists somewhere out there on the net, but I'm not sure
where to look. (For the curious, I'll be using it on DEC Alphas running OSF ver 1.3.)
Any pointers, suggestions, or other useful information would be greatly appreciated.
Email is preferred, but post too if you think this might be of general interst. 

Thanks,

- Brent
(panther@mit.edu)

-----------[000019][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 00:12:53 GMT
From:      u8334527@cc.nctu.edu.tw (Iap Su-Bin / Ye Shi-Min)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   [Q] What is IAB, IEN and RTR?

Dear Netters,


What is IEN and RTR?
I see these terms in rfc-index.txt.

What is the relation between Internet Activties Board and
Internet Archtecture Board?

Thanks in advance.


-- Su-Bin

-----------[000020][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 11:04:10 -0500
From:      elf@twain.ucs.umass.edu (Michael J. Feuell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: What's FTP Software's Problem?

Clark Bremer <clarkb@netstar.com> wrote:
>.ericsson.se> exujsw@exu.ericsson.se (Jeff Wall) writes:
>>Does anyone know another vendor which can provide the same features as the
>>latest release PC/TCP product?  I prefer not to do business with companies
>>providing such poor service.
>
>Although I did not have the problems with FTP you mentioned, I recently 
>switched (for political reasons) from FTP's PC/TCP to InterCon's TCP Connect 
>II.  It has all the features of PC/TCP, including NFS, and was very easy to 
>install and configure.  Note: I have not been thrilled with Intercon's 
>technical support, however.  CB.

Try "Ipswitch Inc.". There products are great, and there support has been
in my opinion above what I would expect.

They have TCP/IP stacks for DOS(uses<6K),DOS/Windows,Windows(a VxD),OS/2,
and a version called Catipult that allows machines on lans to share an IP.
They have an nfsserver, ftp, imail, etc (all the usual apps)...

You can reach them at info@ipswitch.com, or by phone at (617)246-1150.

Michael

***************************************************************************
*   o   * Michael Feuell                           (413) 256-6250 *   o   *
*  -+-  * Network Specialist, MA Global Internet Consulting Group * o   o *
*   |   * <a href "http://twain.ucs.umass.edu/~elf/">homepage</a> *  o o  *
***************************************************************************

-----------[000021][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 11:18:03 -0500
From:      elf@twain.ucs.umass.edu (Michael J. Feuell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   how to tell the difference between class a,b,c ip's?

Hi, I'm writing some utilities for setting up your host's information.
I'd like to be able to generate a default netmask and router for a
given IP address.

Now, if I have my info right so far, class C is for IP addresses that
start with 192-254, class A is 1-127, and class B is 128-191.

But what would the various netmasks be? For class C is it 255.255.0 ?
(I'm going to be compatible with the Winsock v1.1 spec, which should be
 the same as standard Berkeley sockets)
For class A&B is it 255.255.255.0?
Will I ever encounter a a valid IP with less than 4 numbers in it?
(Other than a class C netmask?)
Will the router always be the same first three numbers?
Is there a standard for what the last number will be?
Is there any other info I should be aware of?

Lastly, what defines a valid IP address?
So far all I have is that 1) contains 4 numbers, 2) each of those numbers
must be greater than 0 and less than 255. (except localhost and the netmask)

Michael

[email responses preferred]

***************************************************************************
*   o   * Michael Feuell                           (413) 256-6250 *   o   *
*  -+-  * Network Specialist, MA Global Internet Consulting Group * o   o *
*   |   * <a href "http://twain.ucs.umass.edu/~elf/">homepage</a> *  o o  *
***************************************************************************

-----------[000022][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 15:39:24 -0600
From:      vnvybl8@shoes.Bell-Atl.Com (Michael G. Blansfield)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Traceroute Problems - HELP!

Hello,

I have been using the traceroute utility for years and find it
to be a very useful tool.  I have a problem with it though,
I would like to be able to do alternate source tracing using 
the -s option but I always get this error:

traceroute: bind:: Can't assign requested address

Why do I get this error and is this a bug or a feature?

The system I am running this on is an HP 9000/887 running 
HP-UX A.9.04

Any help much appreciated!

Thanks,

Mike

=**= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =**=
Michael G. Blansfield  Bluestone, Open Systems Integration and Support Staff
1717 Arch Street (6S2), Philadelphia, PA 19103  
Voice Mail: (215)466-2131 or Voice Live: (908) 577-9863
Fax: (215)563-0517 E-mail: Michael.G.Blansfield@Bell-Atl.Com

-----------[000023][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 02 Nov 1994 19:05:57 -0800
From:      mahboud@aggroup.com (mahboud)
To:        comp.protocols.appletalk,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Appletalk->TCP/IP Router/Gateway

In article <nrgCynKJH.ECI@netcom.com>, nrg@netcom.com (Ethan I. Miller) wrote:

> Greetings!
> 
> I'm looking for software that will act as a kind of Appletalk to TCP-Ip
> router and gateway. Basically, here's what's going on: Bnch of Macs on an
 .....
> 
> So to solve the problem using Eudora, look like we need some device (or
> software!) to provide IP service to the ethernet so that the other machines
> can connect via MacTCP.
> 


I may be missing something, but if all the Macs are on Ethernet, then you
should be able to use MacTCP without the need for any devices.  Just
configure MacTCP to use static or dynamic addresses, and not server
based.  Then make sure you select Ethernet as the transport and not
EtherTalk.

Write me if you need more help.

-mahboud

---------------------------------------------------------------
Mahboud Zabetian
mahboud@aggroup.com
ag group, inc.
2540 camino diablo, suite 200
walnut creek, ca 94596
510-937-7900 voice
510-937-2479 fax
510-937-6704 ara
ftp.aggroup.com anonymous ftp

-----------[000024][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 14:29:18 -0500
From:      elf@twain.ucs.umass.edu (Michael J. Feuell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: 2 Nets, 1 Wire - Followup issues

Zippy <sab@dockmaster.phantom.com> wrote:
>OK, so we've determined that 2 IP networks can coexist on a single physical
>medium (although this might not be very desirable).  I set up a test
>environment with four hosts as follows:
>
>hosts A and B are on IP network W.X.1
>hosts C and D are on IP network W.X.2
>
>(these are class-C addresses).
>
>Here's what happens: when A or B sends a broadcast ping (W.X.1.255) within
>its own network, C and D respond to it, even though they're on a different
>network!  The netmasks are set correctly (255.255.255.0).  The same behavior

I've been trying to find outinformation about this for a while, but isn't
the netmask for a class c address supposed to be 255.255.0 ?

Michael

(any info would be appreciated...)

-----------[000025][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 1994 07:05:33 GMT
From:      szhang@champ.wnet.gov.edmonton.ab.ca (Shaw Zhang)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   RFC site ?


Thanks in advance for any pointers to FTP sites with RFC's for TCP/IP
stuff, such as RFC for LPD? 


/*----------------------------------------------------------+
| Shaw Zhang           szhang@champ.wnet.gov.edmonton.ab.ca |
| Public Works, City of Edmonton, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada |
|        (I only speak for my self not for my employer)     | 
 +----------------------------------------------------------*/

-----------[000026][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 15:56:13 -0500
From:      mascari@cis.ohio-state.edu (michael v mascari)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Novell & IBM TCP/IP for DOS 2.1.1

	This is not a TCP/IP specific question but rather a configuration
question.  We have an IBM PS/2 486DX33 with 16 Megs RAM.  It has both
a Token-Ring card and an Intel EtherNet Express card.  The TR runs TCP/IP
and the Ethernet runs Novell NetWare.  We cannot get more than 351K of
conventional memory.  As a result, we barely get Windows running and 
WordPerfect refuses to run.  We have attempted loadhigh, and devicehigh
stanzas as well as loading DOS into umb.  All has failed. We also have
a 3270 card in the same machine.  Is this possible?  Does anyone have
Windows working well with both TCP/IP + Token Ring & Novell NetWare +
Ethernet Express?

	Thanks for any response,

	Mike Mascari (mascari@cis.ohio-state.edu)

-----------[000027][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 17:37:03 -0600
From:      schenke@Starbase.NeoSoft.COM (Richard Schenke)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HP JetDirect BOOTP problem

My problem with stuck queues is now resolved.  The JetDirect A.03.03
card will send RST to any SYN if it is busy with another job, same
protocol or not.  I worked with the vendor of the Unisys printer driver
software to retry the attempt to open a connection at 5-second intervals.
This fixed the problem of opening a second connection too soon after
the first one closed.  I'll take this thread to comp.periphs.printers,
since I'm not using BOOTP.

Richard Schenke, ISC, Johnson Space Center, NASA
(713) 280-2611   rschenke@isc01.jsc.nasa.gov

-----------[000028][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 94 10:21:22 GMT
From:      Ken.Adair@Dundee.NCR.COM (Ken Adair)
To:        comp.protocols.ppp,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   SLIP Termination

I have an OS/2 PC running IBM's TCP/IP Version 2.0 (no CSDs). I wish to
run a couple of independent third party applications which will require 
the use of a SLIP connection. Each of the applications connect to the
same address and may or may not to run simultaneously. 

The problem is, I want to close the modem link when the last program has
completed. How can I detect when the SLIP line is in use and when the last 
program has finished with the SLIP connection?

Regards

Ken Adair

-----------[000029][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 1994 11:30:14 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: What's FTP Software's Problem?

In article <38rtfg$i9j@news1.hh.ab.com> jim.jankowski@ab.com (James J. Jankowski) writes:
>>
>>I have been pleased with the performance of Microsoft TCP/IP-32 For
>>Windows For Workgroups 3.11.  Microsoft has set the right price point: 
>>free from ftp.microsoft.com in the peropsys/windows/tcpip directory.  It
>>doesn't have all the GUI utilities of PC/TCP, but you can duplicate these
>>by adding WINSOCK apps.
>>
>Keep in mind that MS-TCP/IP does not give you NFS cpabilities !!

This is true HOWEVER for a PC the lan manager over TCP/IP protocols are
just as convenient and there is SAMBA a free lan manager server (see
comp.protocols.smb).

Alan
-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000030][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 1994 11:39:56 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: dynamic ip addresses

In article <stu.7.000F7741@lab.r1.fws.gov> stu@lab.r1.fws.gov (Stu  Mitchell) writes:
>I would like to dynamically allocate ip addresses from some sort of server. 
>For example, when the PC boots up, it queries the server for an address and 
>the server hands out the next available address.

Caution is a good idea. Firstly so when someone says host x.y.z.a is doing
something annoying you can find out who it is. Secondly because you can't
reissue an address until the ARP entry for its previous users have expired.

>I think my other option is to run several subnets (4) on the large ring by 
>properly configuring our Cisco to route to the subnets. Does that make sense?

Yep

Alan


-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000031][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 94 16:43:51 EST
From:      nes@icf.hrb.com (Nancy E. Stahl)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP/IP and MAC metering SW

Hi,
   I'm looking for some opinions on application metering software for running
on a server (maybe a SUN workstation or an Alpha) using TCP/IP for MACs.  I
hope this makes sense.  Sorry, I'm kind of new to all of this. But, I sure
would appreciate any help you can give.  

			Thanks in advance,

			Nancy


-----------[000032][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 21:47:20 -0600
From:      phil@zeus.fasttax.com (Phil Howard)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SELECT & Non-Blocking Connect

SDEMOOY@bcsc02.gov.bc.ca writes:

>I am having trouble trying to do a NON-BLOCKING connect
>to a socket.  I have included a fragent of my code.  It
>should be noted that if I do a BLOCKING connect, my program
>works properly so I am hopefully to code I chopped out is
>not going to mis-lead.  My version of Unix is V 3.2.
>My problem is when I get into my WHILE loop because the
>connect is NON-BLOCKING my SELECT command immediately
>returns the fact that it is CONNECTED while in reality
>it is not because my next write statement fails with the
>error SOCKET IS NOT CONNECTED.  What I would like to know
>is: Can I do this with my version of Unix and TCP/IP?
>BTW, the version of TCP/IP = TCP/IP WIN/386 Release 3.0.

I'm not certain that this is required, but readings suggest that it is
and I've always coded it this way.  Do another connect() after select()
has indicated the socket fd is ready for writing.

The conceptual idea here is that EWOULDBLOCK starts, but does not
finish, the operation you attempted to do.  Although the TCP connection
may in fact be setup, it might not have completed the association of
that connection with your socket.

Code the connect() in the loop as well so that there is only ONE
place you have the connect().  Test for a successful connection
and break out of the loop if there is one, or return/exit if there
is a serious error.

I am assuming you indeed got the code EWOULDBLOCK.  Not all systems
will give that code even though they would for read() or write().
A fragment of my own code to deal with various platforms is:

            if ( 0
#if defined(EAGAIN)
                || EAGAIN == errno
#endif
#if defined(EWOULDBLOCK)
                || EWOULDBLOCK == errno
#endif
#if defined(EINPROGRESS)
                || EINPROGRESS == errno
#endif


Once you have connect() and select() in the same loop together,
getting out only when a connection is reported by connect() or
an error occurs, then you might get a better idea what is going
on.  Keep a counter and exit after 10 rounds of the loop to tell
you if select() and connect() disagree on the status.  Even go
so far, if all else fails, of commenting out the select() and
let the code spin on connect() and see if you even can get
connected properly.  You might want to track the time in the
spin and get out in say 15 seconds just in case.
-- 
/***** Phil Howard KA9WGN *********** How about universal JOBS? **************\
*      Unix/Internet/Sys Admin        Let's de-Foley-ate congress in 94       *
*      CLR/Fast-Tax                   Don't let Annie get your gun!           *
\***** phil@fasttax.com ************* Just say NO to CIX extortion ***********/

-----------[000033][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 13:36:25 GMT
From:      nasol2@mgt.kaist.ac.kr (nasol)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   [HELP] Would you help me?

I am looking for a package program named Phil Karn's KA9Q. If somebody tell me
where I can get it, it will be greatly appreciated.

Also, I want any informations or comments, and if possible, other source programs
for TCP/IP router(with respect to RIP, OSPF, SNMP(especially, MIB#2) etc.), which
can be implemented and runned under "DOS" environment.

Thank you !  Good luck with you !


from :  Kim, dohoon
        Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
e-mail : kimdh@telmal.kaist.ac.kr

date : 1994. 11. 2.

-----------[000034][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 14:01:52 GMT
From:      atkinson@sundance.itd.nrl.navy.mil (Ran Atkinson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: dynamic ip addresses

>How will you know when a dynamically assigned address is no longer valid ?

See the most recent RFC on the "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)".

DHCP "leases" addresses for known lifetimes after which they expire.
The "lease" may be renewed or extended before expiration.  It is quite
a clever scheme and DHCP support and servers are now appearing in
commercial products from Sun, Microsoft, etc.

Ran
atkinson@itd.nrl.navy.mil

-----------[000035][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 22:57:32 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: how to tell the difference between class a,b,c ip's?

In article <398e3rINN108@twain.ucs.umass.edu> elf@twain.ucs.umass.edu (Michael J. Feuell) writes:
>Now, if I have my info right so far, class C is for IP addresses that
>start with 192-254, class A is 1-127, and class B is 128-191.

Right.

>But what would the various netmasks be? For class C is it 255.255.0 ?

No.  Class A is 255.0.0.0, class B is 255.255.0.0, and class C is
255.255.255.0.

>Will I ever encounter a a valid IP with less than 4 numbers in it?

No.  IP addresses are all 32 bits.  Each number is an 8-bit octet.

>(Other than a class C netmask?)

Netmasks are also 32 bits, so they're also 4 numbers (when written in
dotted decimal format) or 8 hex digits.

>Will the router always be the same first three numbers?

All the machines on the same subnet have the same network/subnet portion.
The network/subnet portion is the part that corresponds to the 1 bits in
the netmask.  On a class C network, the addresses all have the same first
three numbers.

>Is there a standard for what the last number will be?

No, except that nodes can't use all 0's or all 1's in the host portion.
Some obscure network technologies require a direct mapping between the IP
host number and the hardware address, but most common ones don't have such
a requirement, and host numbers can be assigned arbitrarily.

>Is there any other info I should be aware of?

I think you should read up about TCP/IP in general.  Try the book
"Internetworking with TCP/IP".

>Lastly, what defines a valid IP address?
>So far all I have is that 1) contains 4 numbers, 2) each of those numbers
>must be greater than 0 and less than 255. (except localhost and the netmask)

Yes.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000036][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 15:48:14 GMT
From:      d.w.stevenson@ccsun.strath.ac.uk (Dave Stevenson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Berkeley packet filters - Where?

Pointers to this software please.

Many thanks.

---
Dave Stevenson 				d.w.stevenson@strath.ac.uk
Computer Centre Communications		Tel : 44 41-552 4400 ext 3461
University of Strathclyde
Glasgow, Scotland, U.K. 


-----------[000037][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 16:07:17 -0000
From:      jlwilson@news.delphi.com (JLWILSON@DELPHI.COM)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   setsockopt() linger problem

Hello,

I am writing an application which blasts a packet of data to several 
servers in sequence. The servers are started by inetd and are occasionally
not getting the entire packet. I discovered that inserting a small
sleep() between the client's write() and close() fixed that problem,
so I suspect that not all the data packet is being written, but it is
being discarded upon close(). 

So, I am attempting to use setsockopt() to set the socket "linger"
option and force the client to wait until all data is written before 
doing the close(). It does not seem to be working. 

I'm using AIX 3.2.5 on a RS/6000. Here's a skeleton of the code.

struct linger *linger_time;

(malloc space for linger_time)

linger_time->l_linger = 15; /*sec*/
linger_time->l_onoff = 1;

(create socket)

if (setsockopt(sockets[i], SOL_SOCKET, S_LINGER, (char *)linger_time,
  sizeof(struct linger)) < 0) ...

(connect, write and close)

This seems to have no effect. Any ideas?

Thanks
Jonathan Wilson
jwilson@ipn.com


-----------[000038][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 16:28:37 GMT
From:      vinnie@pocono.microserve.com (Vinnie)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Raw Sockets & Interface Selection?


I posted this question once before, but never got a response.
I'll try one more time:

Is there a way to specify a particular network interface to send
outgoing packets to? 

What I need to be able to do is specify which interface, (on a UNIX
host which has multiple interfaces), a packet will be sent out on.
I am using raw sockets. I don't want to exec() a 'route add...' if
there is a better way.

Thanks,
=Vinnie=

-----------[000039][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 03 Nov 1994 00:48:58 -0500
From:      Benjamin.Olken@yale.edu (Ben Olken)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Domain Names & Aliasing

I have a few questions:

First, if I want to register a new domain name, to whom do I talk and how
does that process work? (assumning I want to do it myself, and not through
some priovider)

Second, let's say I have been granted the right to such a name. How do I
assign an IP# to that name? Moreover, how do I go about changing that IP#
later on? I don't have much experience with the technical side of things
here, and I don't have complete control over the server. Ideally, I'd like
to just ask someone to create this computer.domain.com alias out there
pointing to an already existing IP#? Is that possible? How do I do it?

Ben Olken

-----------[000040][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 16:40:00 GMT
From:      xray@cs.brandeis.edu (Nathan G. Raymond)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   I have an IP address; now how do I get a domain name?

My school has the campus networked with Apple LocalTalk connectors (which use the serial port 
and get a throughput of about 230kbytes/second in optimum conditions, real world closer to 
50kbytes/second), so my Mac uses MacTCP to connect to the Internet, and it is configured for 
Class B Dynamic addressing, so the IP adddress changes each time the computer is turned on or 
restarted.  Is there any way to resolve this to a domain name or lock down the IP address?  
How about creating a dynamic .plan file on my unix account which can retrieve the current IP 
address of my Mac and display it when my account is fingered?  Any help will be greatly 
appreciated.

xray@cs.brandeis.edu

-----------[000041][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 17:28:25 GMT
From:      sab@dockmaster.phantom.com (Zippy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   2 Nets, 1 Wire - Followup issues

OK, so we've determined that 2 IP networks can coexist on a single physical
medium (although this might not be very desirable).  I set up a test
environment with four hosts as follows:

hosts A and B are on IP network W.X.1
hosts C and D are on IP network W.X.2

(these are class-C addresses).

Here's what happens: when A or B sends a broadcast ping (W.X.1.255) within
its own network, C and D respond to it, even though they're on a different
network!  The netmasks are set correctly (255.255.255.0).  The same behavior
is exhibited when C or D sends a broadcast ping.

TCP/UDP services do not seem to work across network boundaries (telnet, FTP,
and NFS).

My question is this:  Is the fact that hosts on a different network respond to
a local broadcast ping 1) standard ICMP behavior, 2) a peculiarity within
ICMP, or 3) an indication of a larger problem/issue?

It's only fair to point out that it *could* be our physical medium (PBX),
so others might not get the same results.  If you don't (or can confirm
my results), please let me know.

Please respond via e-mail to sab@phantom.com.  If there's interest, I'll
summarize.

--
Seth Bromberger
sab@phantom.com

-----------[000042][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 1994 17:29:31 GMT
From:      geoff@netcom.com (Geoffrey Leach)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,alt.dcom.slip-emulators,comp.dcom.modems
Subject:   Q: tslip connection to variable-ip-address server

I have tslip 2.8.2 running on under SVR4.0.3 on a 486 PC. The server I'm
dialing into assigns the IP address of the connection to the port (modem)
so there's no way to determine in advance what my IP address will be.

tslip uses an autodial feature (borrowed from Taylor uucp), so the making
on the connection (and the discovery of today's IP address) is burried
in the connection code.

Any experience and/or suggestions?


-- 
Geoffrey Leach          C/C++/X11/Motif/OpenLook Implementation
geoff@netcom.com        Mountain Ranch Software
                        P.O. Box 336
                        Mountain Ranch CA  95246
                        209-754-1869

-----------[000043][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 17:40:47 GMT
From:      sab@dockmaster.phantom.com (Zippy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   HP-UX 9.0 & Supernets

Experiments show, and HP has confirmed, that the recent release of HP-UX (9.0)
will not allow the user to change the subnet mask to allow supernetting.
Attempting to give a mask of 0xfffffe00 to an address in the 199.169.29 range
had the effect of resetting the netmask to the default class-C mask
(0xffffff00) WITHOUT any warning being given (under ifconfig). 

Using the system administration utility (SAM) yielded an error saying 
that such a netmask is impossible in the class-C address space.

HP is aware of this problem and is working to correct it their next release
of HP-UX (10.0), scheduled for release in late 4Q94.  Until then, the
problem has been given a medium priority, although several HP engineers have
assured me that they're escalating it.  One of the engineers expressed
doubt that the problem would be resolved in the current release of HP-UX and
might even be delayed until 4Q95.



--
Seth Bromberger
sab@phantom.com

-----------[000044][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 1994 17:41:04 GMT
From:      albaugh@agames.agames.com (Mike Albaugh)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SELECT & Non-Blocking Connect

SDEMOOY@bcsc02.gov.bc.ca wrote:
:  
: I am having trouble trying to do a NON-BLOCKING connect
: to a socket.  I have included a fragent of my code.  It
: should be noted that if I do a BLOCKING connect, my program
: works properly so I am hopefully to code I chopped out is
: not going to mis-lead.  My version of Unix is V 3.2.

	If this is Esix (or possibly other SYSVR3.2 for '386),
there is a known bug in the code for select() which results
in possible trashing of variables local to the caller. That
is, the (assembly language) select() library call does not
save all the registers that the system call select() trashes.
I am no longer using Esix, so I don't recall the details, but
a fairly short time with the debugger and a copy of the
kernel docs should do the trick :-).

: BTW, the version of TCP/IP = TCP/IP WIN/386 Release 3.0.

	WIN? on *nix? I must be _way_ out of date on this stuff.
I'll let more knowledgeable folks here comment on the code.

				Mike

| Mike Albaugh (albaugh@agames.com)
| Atari Games Corp (Arcade Games, soon to be Time Warner Interactive)
| 675 Sycamore Dr. Milpitas, CA 95035		voice: (408)434-1709
| The opinions expressed are my own (Boy, are they ever)

-----------[000045][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 17:53:47 GMT
From:      abe@vic.cc.purdue.edu (Vic Abell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Question: Who is using these UDP ports?

In article <1994Nov1.165021.5746@lmpsbbs.comm.mot.com> hooker@comm.mot.com writes:
>...
>
>netstat -a
>udp          0        0   *.1191                 *.*
>udp          0        0   *.1193                 *.*
>
>My question is, who is using these ports?

Sounds like lsof might help.  It lists files opened to Unix processes
and has filters for handling socket file values.  Given your example,
the command

	$ lsof -iUDP:1191 -iUDP:1193

would display information on the processes using UDP ports 1191 or
1193.  Lsof works on many Unix dialects, including V/88 R32V3 and
R40V42.

You can get lsof via anonymous ftp from vic.cc.purdue.edu.  Look
in pub/lsof.README for further distribution information.

Vic Abell, lsof author

-----------[000046][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 94 18:01:10 WET
From:      nada@ccvax.ucd.ie
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   ip<-->ipx mapping


Hello,
I well appreaciate any respose from you if anybody provide me information
about IPX <--> IP mapping
Thanks
      email  nada@ccvax.ucd.ie





-----------[000047][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 1994 18:26:05 GMT
From:      nrg@netcom.com (Ethan I. Miller)
To:        comp.protocols.appletalk,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Appletalk->TCP/IP Router/Gateway

Greetings!

I'm looking for software that will act as a kind of Appletalk to TCP-Ip
router and gateway. Basically, here's what's going on: Bnch of Macs on an
ethernet. One Mac has PPP connection to internet, IP number, domain name,
etc. Same Mac is also running a Mac_based SMTP/POP3 server (Mail Share).
So, if the rest of the macs on the ethernet could coonect to the POP server
on My mac the could all send and receive internet email. ONly problem is,
our mailer (Eudora) will only connect via the CTB (modem or serial) or via
MacTCP which, or course, requires that some device on the ethernet be
providing IP service (ie numbers). 

So to solve the problem using Eudora, look like we need some device (or
software!) to provide IP service to the ethernet so that the other machines
can connect via MacTCP.

To solve the problem without using Eudora looks like we need a standard
appletalk based mailer (applemail, quickmail, etc.) and ans SMTP gateway...

I know commercial products (expensive ones) exist for all these niches, but
I've got it 98% there using strictly shareware and freeware, and simply for
the sake of it I'd like to accomplish the whole thing along these lines.

Suggestions anyone?

take it easy
ethan miller

-----------[000048][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      02 Nov 1994 19:19:23 GMT
From:      reinholz@SG0D12.sig01 (Jeff Reinholz)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Raw Sockets & Interface Selection?

Generally this is done with the PF_* protocol family id's. There are other
get and set net config routines that can be found in "UNIX SYSV network
programming" Chapter 5. The fact that you are using raw sockets should
not matter, using setnetconfig. First man setnetconfig and make sure
that is what you are looking for.

-----------[000049][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 1994 20:23:30 GMT
From:      donp@novell.com (don provan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In article <38ococ$lme@martha.utk.edu> hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu (Paul Hethmon) writes:
>I know of two interpretations of this. One is the standard Unix
>implemented style like wu-ftpd which also includes directories
>as files. The other does not include directories in the reply.

I've never heard of any implementation that didn't consider
directories to be files for the purposes of NLST. Not returning the
directories in the file listing would make it impossible to navigate
down the directory tree.

The more interesting question is whether the file names should include
the path. I've always contended that a "name" sent out to a remote
node would have to include the file's location since the remote
node does not have enough information to construct a full name from
the information it has. Unfortunately, this is definitely not common
practice. In fact, I don't recall seeing any FTP server (other than my
own) that returned, say, "/usr/include/stdio.h" as the file name in an
NLST. Fortunately, this is not as much of an issue as it once was
since most FTP servers these days present a UNIX style directory
structure even when their native directory structure doesn't look like
UNIX to local users. As this trend continues, the common practice of
returing only the name in the local context (e.g., "stdio.h") in NLST
will be less and less of a problem.

					don provan
					donp@novell.com

-----------[000050][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      2 Nov 1994 20:29:44 GMT
From:      p_quinn@ECE.Concordia.CA (Paul Quinn)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Free/Shareware implementation


I'll be installing a small network in the Concordia Student branch of the IEEE.

Since we are a student organization, we would like to not have to spend
a lot of money on a TCP/IP stack.

Can anyone recomend a low priced or a freeware TCP/IP?



--
________
Paul Quinn
p_quinn@ece.concordia.ca
Computer Science: Systems Architecture
Concordia University
Montreal, QC, CANADA
--------

-----------[000051][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 94 21:51:41 GMT
From:      rr002c@uhura.cc.rochester.edu (Rajib Rashid)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.wintcp,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Please help with problem with MSTCP/IP and Mosaic

Hello:

	I recently switched from Trumpet Winsock to Microsoft's 32bit TCP/IP
stacks (wolverine) for my 486 computer with 8MB ram, running windows for
Workgroup 3.11. Everything seems to work wonderfully, except when someone
tries to access large files via Mosaic/WinWeb from my machine (running NCSA
HTTPD 1.3), they get an error "connection has been reset" ... I have found
no apparent reason for this behavior. I never found this problem when I was
using Trumpet Winsock, and the same files were easily accessible. Is there
some special spep that need to take, or some trick that I can use to fix
this problem? I really need to get this problem fixed since some of the
files on my Web server are not at all accessible :(

	I would really appreciate it if someone could give me a solution.
Thank you very much in advance. Please send your replies to
'outcast@cif.rochester.edu'

	Rajib Rashid
	University of Rochester


-----------[000052][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 2 Nov 1994 22:15:02 GMT
From:      gnn@netcom.com (George Neville-Neil)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   FAQ for November

Hi Folks,

	OK, here is the latest FAQ.  Remember you can always get it from:
ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/gnn/tcp-ip.faq


	As always all corrections stuff should be sent to me.

Later,
George


Archive-name:tcp-ip/FAQ
Last-modified:  1994/11/2

Internet Protocol Frequently Asked Questions

Maintained by: George V. Neville-Neil (gnn@netcom.com)
Contributions from:
Ran Atkinson
Stephane Bortzmeyer
Rodney Brown
Dr. Charles E. Campbell Jr.
Phill Conrad 
Alan Cox
Rick Jones
Jon Kay 
Jay Kreibrich
William Manning
Barry Margolin 
Jim Muchow
Subu Rama
W. Richard Stevens 
 
Version 1.7


************************************************************************

	The following is a list of Frequently Asked Questions, and
their answers, for people interested in the Internet Protocols,
including TCP, UDP, ICMP and others.  Please send all additions,
corrections, complaints and kudos to the above address.  This FAQ will
be posted on or about the first of every month.

	This FAQ is available for anonymous ftp from :
ftp.netcom.com:/pub/gnn/tcp-ip.faq .  You may get it from my home page at
ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/gnn/gnn.html

************************************************************************

Table of Contents:
Glossary
1) Are there any good books on IP?
2) Where can I find example source code for TCP/UDP/IP?
3) Are there any public domain programs to check the performance of an
IP link? 
4) Where do I find RFCs?
5) How can I detect that the other end of a TCP connection has
crashed?  Can I use "keepalives" for this?
6) Can the keepalive timeouts be configured?
7) Can I set up a gateway to the Internet that translates IP
addresses, so that I don't have to change all our internal addresses 
to an official network? 
8) Are there object-oriented network programming tools?
9) What other FAQs are related to this one?
10) What newsgroups contain information on networks/protocols?

Glossary:

I felt this should be first given the plethora of acronyms used in the
rest of this FAQ.

IP: Internet Protocol.  The lowest layer protocol defined in TCP/IP.
This is the base layer on which all other protocols mentioned herein
are built.  IP is often referred to as TCP/IP as well.

UDP: User Datagram Protocol.  This is a connectionless protocol built
on top of IP.  It does not provide any guarantees on the ordering or
delivery of messages.  This protocol is layered on top of IP.

TCP: Transmission Control Protocol.  TCP is a connection oriented
protocol that guarantees that messages are delivered in the order in
which they were sent and that all messages are delivered.  If a TCP
connection cannot deliver a message it closes the connection and
informs the entity that created it.  This protocol is layered on top
of IP.

ICMP:  Internet Control Message Protocol.  ICMP is used for
diagnostics in the network.  The Unix program, ping, uses ICMP
messages to detect the status of other hosts in the net.  ICMP
messages can either be queries (in the case of ping) or error reports,
such as when a network is unreachable.

RFC: Request For Comment.  RFCs are documents that define the
protocols used in the IP Internet.  Some are only suggestions, some
are even jokes, and others are published standards.  Several sites in
the Internet store RFCs and make them available for anonymous ftp.

SLIP:  Serial Line IP.  An implementation of IP for use over a serial
link (modem).  CSLIP is an optimized (compressed) version of SLIP that
gives better throughput.

Bandwidth:  The amount of data that can be pushed through a link in
unit time.  Usually measured in bits or bytes per second.

Latency:  The amount of time that a message spends in a network going
from point A to point B.

Jitter:  The effect seen when latency is not a constant.  That is, if
messages experience a different latencies between two points in a
network.

RPC:  Remote Procedure Call.  RPC is a method of making network access
to resource transparent to the application programmer by supplying a
"stub" routine that is called in the same way as a regular procedure
call.  The stub actually performs the call across the network to
another computer.

Marshalling:  The process of taking arbitrary data (characters,
integers, structures) and packing them up for transmission across a
network.

MBONE: A virtual network that is a Multicast backBONE.  It is still a
research prototype, but it extends through most of the core of the
Internet (including North America, Europe, and Australia).  It uses IP
Multicasting which is defined in RFC-1112.  An MBONE FAQ is available
via anonymous ftp from: ftp.isi.edu" There are frequent broadcasts of
multimedia programs (audio and low bandwidth video) over the MBONE.
Though the MBONE is used for mutlicasting, the long haul parts of the
MBONE use point-to-point connections through unicast tunnels to
connect the various multicast networks worldwide.


1) Are there any good books on IP?

A) Yes.  Please see the following:

Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume I
(Principles, Protocols, and Architecture)
Douglas E. Comer
Prentice Hall 1991 ISBN 0-13-468505-9

This volume covers all of the protocols, including IP, UDP, TCP, and
the gateway protocols.  It also includes discussions of higher level
protocols such as FTP, TELNET, and NFS.

Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume II
(Design, Implementation, and Internals)
Douglas E. Comer / David L. Stevens
Prentice Hall 1991  ISBN 0-13-472242-6

Discusses the implementation of the protocols and gives numerous code
examples.

Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume III (BSD Socket Version)
(Client - Server Programming and Applications)
Douglas E. Comer / David L. Stevens
Prentice Hall 1993  ISBN 0-13-474222-2

This book discusses programming applications that use the internet
protocols.  It includes examples of telnet, ftp clients and servers.
Discusses RPC and XDR at length.

TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1: The Protocols, 
W. Richard Stevens
(c) Addison-Wesley, 1994  ISBN 0-201-63346-9

An excellent introduction to the entire TCP/IP protocol suite,
covering all the major protocols, plus several important applications.

Unix Network Programming
W. Richard Stevens
Prentice Hall 1990  ISBN 0-13-949876

An excellent introduction to network programming under Unix.

The Design and Implementation of the 4.3 BSD Operating System
Samuel J. Leffler, Marshall Kirk McKusick, Michael J. Karels, John S.
Quarterman 
Addison-Wesley 1989  ISBN 0-201-06196-1

Though this book is a reference for the entire operating system, the
eleventh and twelfth chapters completely explain how the networking
protocols are implemented in the kernel.


2)  Where can I find example source code for TCP/UDP/IP?

A)  Code from the Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume III is available
for anonymous ftp from:

arthur.cs.purdue.edu:/pub/dls

Code used in the Net-2 version of Berkeley Unix is available for
anonymous ftp from:

ftp.uu.net:systems/unix/bsd-sources/sys/netinet 

and

gatekeeper.dec.com:/pub/BSD/net2/sys/netinet

Code from Richard Steven's book is available on:
ftp.uu.net:/published/books/stevens.*

Example source code and libraries to make coding quicker is available
in the Simple Sockets Library written at NASA.  The Simple Sockets
Library makes sockets easy to use!  And, it comes as source code.  It
has been tested on: Unix (SGI, DecStation, AIX, Sun 3, Sparcstation;
version 2.02+: Solaris 2.1, SCO), VMS, and MSDOS (client only since
there's no background there).  It is provided in source code form, of
course, and sits atop Berkeley sockets and tcp/ip.

You can order the "Simple Sockets Library" from

                           Austin Code Works
                          11100 Leafwood Lane
                       Austin, TX 78750-3464 USA
                         Phone (512) 258-0785
                 
Ask for the "SSL - The Simple Sockets Library".  Last I checked, they
were asking $20 US for it.


For DOS there is WATTCP.ZIP (numerous sites): 

WATTCP is a DOS TCP/IP stack derived from the NCSA Telnet program and
much enhanced. It comes with some example programs and complete source
code. The interface isn't BSD sockets but is well suited to PC type
work. It is also written so that it can be used and memory
allocation).

3)  Are there any public domain programs to check the performance of
an IP link?

A)  

TTCP:  Available for anonymous ftp from....

Host gatekeeper.dec.com

    Location: /.0/BSD/NetBSD/NetBSD-current/othersrc
      DIRECTORY dr-xr-xr-x        512  Apr  8 09:57  ttcp
    Location: /.0/BSD/NetBSD/NetBSD-current/othersrc/ttcp
           FILE -r--r--r--       3885  Nov  7 03:35  ttcp.1
           FILE -r--r--r--      19225  Nov  7 03:35  ttcp.c

Host world.std.com

    Location: /src/wuarchive/graphics/graphics/mirrors/sgi.com/sgi/src/ttcp
           FILE -r--r--r--       3885  Oct  4 1991  ttcp.1
           FILE -r--r--r--      19170  May 17 1993  ttcp.c
           FILE -r--r--r--      13033  Sep  5 1989  ttcp.c-brl

On ftp.sgi.com are netperf (from Rick Jones at HP) and nettest
(from Dave Borman at Cray).  ttcp is also availabel at ftp.sgi.com.

Netperf can also be fotten using the Web from:
ftp://ftp.cup.hp.com/dist/networking/benchmarks

as well as:

ftp://col.hp.com/dist/networking/benchmarks



There is suite of Bandwidth Measuring programs from gnn@netcom.com.
Available for anonymous ftp from ftp.netcom.com in
~ftp/gnn/bwmeas-0.3.tar.Z These are several programs that meausre
bandwidth and jitter over several kinds of IPC links, including TCP
and UDP.


4) Where do I find RFCs?

A)  This is the latest info on obtaining RFCs:
Details on obtaining RFCs via FTP or EMAIL may be obtained by sending
an EMAIL message to rfc-info@ISI.EDU with the message body 
help: ways_to_get_rfcs.  For example:

        To: rfc-info@ISI.EDU
        Subject: getting rfcs

        help: ways_to_get_rfcs

The response to this mail query is quite long and has been omitted.

RFCs can be obtained via FTP from DS.INTERNIC.NET, NIS.NSF.NET,
NISC.JVNC.NET, FTP.ISI.EDU, WUARCHIVE.WUSTL.EDU, SRC.DOC.IC.AC.UK,
FTP.CONCERT.NET, or FTP.SESQUI.NET.


Using Web, WAIS, and gopher:

Web:

http://web.nexor.co.uk/rfc-index/rfc-index-search-form.html

WAIS access by keyword:

wais://wais.cnam.fr/RFC

Excellent presentation with a full-text search too:

http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/information/rfc.html

With Gopher:

gopher://r2d2.jvnc.net/11/Internet%20Resources/RFC
gopher://muspin.gsfc.nasa.gov:4320/1g2go4%20ds.internic.net%2070%201%201/.ds/
.internetdocs



5) How can I detect that the other end of a TCP connection has crashed?
Can I use "keepalives" for this?

A) Detecting crashed systems over TCP/IP is difficult.  TCP doesn't require
any transmission over a connection if the application isn't sending
anything, and many of the media over which TCP/IP is used (e.g. ethernet)
don't provide a reliable way to determine whether a particular host is up.
If a server doesn't hear from a client, it could be because it has nothing
to say, some network between the server and client may be down, the server
or client's network interface may be disconnected, or the client may have
crashed.  Network failures are often temporary (a thin ethernet will appear
down while someone is adding a link to the daisy chain, and it often takes
a few minutes for new routes to stabilize when a router goes down), and TCP
connections shouldn't be dropped as a result.

Keepalives are a feature of the sockets API that requests that an empty
packet be sent periodically over an idle connection; this should evoke an
acknowledgement from the remote system if it is still up, a reset if it has
rebooted, and a timeout if it is down.  These are not normally sent until
the connection has been idle for a few hours.  The purpose isn't to detect
a crash immediately, but to keep unnecessary resources from being allocated
forever.

If more rapid detection of remote failures is required, this should be
implemented in the application protocol.  There is no standard mechanism
for this, but an example is requiring clients to send a "no-op" message
every minute or two.  An example protocol that uses this is X Display
Manager Control Protocol (XDMCP), part of the X Window System, Version 11;
the XDM server managing a session periodically sends a Sync command to the
display server, which should evoke an application-level response, and
resets the session if it doesn't get a response (this is actually an
example of a poor implementation, as a timeout can occur if another client
"grabs" the server for too long).

6) Can the keepalive timeouts be configured?

A) I know they can on many systems, but I don't know the details.

7) Can I set up a gateway to the Internet that translates IP addresses, so
that I don't have to change all our internal addresses to an official
network?

A) There's no general solution to this.  Many protocols include IP
addresses in the application-level data (FTP's "PORT" command is the most
notable), so it isn't simply a matter of translating addresses in the IP
header.  Also, if the network number(s) you're using match those assigned
to another organization, your gateway won't be able to communicate with
that organization (RFC 1597 proposes network numbers that are reserved for
private use, to avoid such conflicts, but if you're already using a
different network number this won't help you).

However, if you're willing to live with limited access to the Internet from
internal hosts, the "proxy" servers developed for firewalls can be used as
a substitute for an address-translating gateway. See the firewall FAQ.

8) Are there object-oriented network programming tools?

A) Yes, and one such system is called ACE (ADAPTIVE Communication
Environment).  Here is how to get more information and the software:

OBTAINING ACE

An HTML version of this README file is available at URL
http://www.cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/ACE.html.  All software and
documentation is available via both anonymous ftp and the Web.

ACE is available for anonymous ftp from the ics.uci.edu (128.195.1.1)
host in the gnu/C++_wrappers.tar.Z file (approximately .5 meg
compressed).  This release contains contains the source code,
documentation, and example test drivers for C++ wrapper libras.

9) What other FAQs might you want to look in?
comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
   Aboba, Bernard D.(1994) "comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc Frequently
    Asked Questions (FAQ)" Usenet news.answers, available via
    file://ftp.netcom.com/pub/mailcom/IBMTCP/ibmtcp.zip,
    57 pages.

comp.protocols.ppp
   Archive-name: ppp-faq/part[1-8]
   URL: http://cs.uni-bonn.de/ppp/part[1-8].html

comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
   ftp site: dorm.rutgers.edu, pub/novell/DOCS
   Ethernet Network Questions and Answers
   Summarized from UseNet group comp.dcom.lans.ethernet

10) What other newsgroups deal with networking?

comp.dcom.cabling       Cabling selection, installation and use.
comp.dcom.isdn          The Integrated Services Digital Network
			(ISDN).
comp.dcom.lans.ethernet Discussions of the Ethernet/IEEE 802.3
			protocols.
comp.dcom.lans.fddi     Discussions of the FDDI protocol suite.
comp.dcom.lans.misc     Local area network hardware and software.
comp.dcom.lans.token-ring       Installing and using token ring
				networks.
comp.dcom.servers       Selecting and operating data communications
			servers.
comp.dcom.sys.cisco     Info on Cisco routers and bridges.
comp.dcom.sys.wellfleet Wellfleet bridge & router systems hardware &
			software.
comp.protocols.ibm      Networking with IBM mainframes.
comp.protocols.iso      The ISO protocol stack.
comp.protocols.kerberos The Kerberos authentication server.
comp.protocols.misc     Various forms and types of protocol.
comp.protocols.nfs      Discussion about the Network File System
			protocol.
comp.protocols.ppp      Discussion of the Internet Point to Point
			Protocol.
comp.protocols.smb      SMB file sharing protocol and Samba SMB
			server/client.
comp.protocols.tcp-ip   TCP and IP network protocols.
comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc     TCP/IP for IBM(-like) personal
				computers.
comp.security.misc      Security isuipment for the PC.
comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc      Windows and other networks.
comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip    Windows and TCP/IP networking.
comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows   Windows' built-in networking.
comp.os.os2.networking.misc     Miscellaneous networking issues of
				OS/2.
comp.os.os2.networking.tcp-ip   TCP/IP under OS/2.
comp.sys.novell         Discussion of Novell Netware products.
-- 
gnn@netcom.com

Law is there to clean up etiquette's failures.
					Ms. Manners

-----------[000053][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 02 Nov 1994 10:14:09 +0800
From:      peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,uk.misc
Subject:   Re: FTP Sites not in English?

In article <393lq5$hu5@hippo.shef.ac.uk>, jp1ek@sunc.shef.ac.uk wrote:

>Max Walshe (maxw@visionware.co.uk) wrote:
>: Does anybody know of any public FTP Sites that send messages and listings
>: in a language other than English? (E.g. French, German etc.)
>
>kuso.shef.ac.uk specializes in Japanese.  

Just a note, but this may confuse many "clever" FTP clients (like web
clients and GUI FTP clients).  Especially if the format of the listing
changes, including the month names.  If the listing format remains
constant, including english month names, then the clients can interpret
the listing and display the result in the local lanugage (including using
whatever is the specified local time format).

Enjoy,
   Peter.
-- 
Peter N Lewis <peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au> - Macintosh TCP fingerpainter
FTP my programs from redback.cs.uwa.edu.au:Others/PeterLewis/ or
amug.org:pub/peterlewis/ or nic.switch.ch:software/mac/peterlewis/

-----------[000054][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 02 Nov 1994 10:16:14 +0800
From:      peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In article <38ococ$lme@martha.utk.edu>, hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu (Paul
Hethmon) wrote:

>Under the NLST command (page 33), the RFC states 
>
>  "The server will return a stream of names of files 
>    and no other information."
>
>I know of two interpretations of this. One is the standard Unix
>implemented style like wu-ftpd which also includes directories
>as files. The other does not include directories in the reply.

The original intention was to only list file names.  directory names are
listed with the NDIR command.  However, this is simply not the way it is
done, so whatever the RFC might say, the "standard" is to list both.  The
"standard" is also to obey certain ls command flasgs (such as -F) and
several other horrid things.  I just love standards :-)
   Peter.
-- 
Peter N Lewis <peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au> - Macintosh TCP fingerpainter
FTP my programs from redback.cs.uwa.edu.au:Others/PeterLewis/ or
amug.org:pub/peterlewis/ or nic.switch.ch:software/mac/peterlewis/

-----------[000055][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 00:23:09 GMT
From:      solkey <solkey@belnet.bellevue.k12.wa.us>
To:        comp.protocols.appletalk,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Appletalk-


> I'm looking for software that will act as a kind of Appletalk to TCP-Ip
> router and gateway. Basically, here's what's going on: Bnch of Macs on an
> ethernet. One Mac has PPP connection to internet, IP number, domain name,
> etc. Same Mac is also running a Mac_based SMTP/POP3 server (Mail Share).
> 
> Suggestions anyone?
> 
> ethan miller

  Looks like your probably going to need a hardware piece.  We use
Cayman GatorStars here.  They go on the ethernet and route tcp/ip to
the Macs running MacTCP, and as an added bonus they also do dynamic 
IP addressing!! 






 -Tobin Solkey
  Data Processing
  Bellevue Public Schools


-----------[000056][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 00:34:27 GMT
From:      Dave Crocker <dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu>
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

In article <399d4g$emr@orinocho.dtt.co.nz> , d.gibson@dtt.co.nz writes:
>I see ALOT of interest and implementation of OSI Systems.

but what about USE?  please provide details.

>These are Big, Serious, Ugly, Fat networks that eat SNMP for
 breakfast.  They are
>built on "industrial strength" CMIP.

Pray tell, Kelly.  What is the meaningful difference between the two,
except for massively larger complexity to CMIP and massively smaller
deployment.  Again, please provide details.  Hearing about how nicely
you are doing, now that you are on your own, is just fine and dandy,
but it doesn't elucidate any sort of technical discussion.

d/
--------------------
Dave Crocker
Brandenburg Consulting                          Phone:  +1 408 246 8253
675 Spruce Dr.                                  Fax:    +1 408 249 6205
Sunnyvale, CA  94086               Email:  dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu

-----------[000057][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 00:36:37 GMT
From:      Dave Crocker <dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu>
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP????

In article <hq-07kv.siscoinfo@delphi.com> SISCO  Inc,
siscoinfo@delphi.com writes:
>industries because the use of standards based communications (MMS and
 OSI)
>address problems that these people need solved that are not addressed
by

please provide details.  what are the functional requirements that
IPng won't solve?

d/
--------------------
Dave Crocker
Brandenburg Consulting                          Phone:  +1 408 246 8253
675 Spruce Dr.                                  Fax:    +1 408 249 6205
Sunnyvale, CA  94086               Email:  dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu

-----------[000058][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 01:07:14 GMT
From:      d.gibson@dtt.co.nz
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

In article <CyJLp4.25o@umassd.edu> rleary@umassd.edu writes:
>     What do you mean by a "Real OSI network"? Where are they "going in" all 
>the time? Who do you see putting in  CLNP or TP4 or even CMIP for that 
>matter.

I see ALOT of interest and implementation of OSI Systems.

The Telephone companies (or other large scale; heterogenous equipment networks)
are investing in the ITU-T's TMN networks (ITU-T M.3010 etc).

These are Big, Serious, Ugly, Fat networks that eat SNMP for breakfast.  They are
built on "industrial strength" CMIP.

The battle cry is "objects to the metal" - in which the object orientation of OSI
is fully exploited.  Why invent when you can specialise from generic object classes.

Lots of manufacturers are supporting this stuff and heavy weights such as Digital
and IBM have development workbenches to allow users to integrate systems.

Take a look at CMIP-run; IBM's "magazine" on network management.  From this I see
a considerable constituency inside IBM promoting CMISE.

The "consumer" router/hub market is dominated by SNMP.  This also correlates with
horrible network management messes.  (My arguement is that SNMP is a "default" state
with people implementing Claytons Mangement solutions - of course you can build good
management systems with SNMP - but not "out of the box").  When you are serious
about management the OSI products look pretty damned good. 

By the way, I am having fun with my Cycle Software OSI stack.  It is a Windows Vxd that
supports a full 7 layer stack (including ACSE).  It runs CLNP, ES-IS, X.500 and supports
Netbios as an API to the OSI stack.  This allows Netbios names to be associated with NSAP
addresses and accessed through OSI routing.

So - if you want OSI on your PC - wait no more.

By the way, IBM will sell you an OSI (7 to ACSE) for OS/2 - if you have been Warped.

The message for OSI integrators is:  "JUST DO IT" (sorry, Nike)
>
>   Has anything been done in the last two years by those involved with 
>the ISO/OSI standards to make them more available.

Alot of the ISO # are available as ITU-T #'s from the info.itu.ch gopher.  I understand
that ISO made some of the low layer CLNP standards (layer services, routing etc) available
to the IETF for consideration in the IPng process.

One final thought: [WARNING - soapbox in progress; music .. please]

For many network applications the OSI suite remains a perfectly valid approach.

I make an increasingly prosperous living as an OSI bigot.  Network solutions that I
am involved in may not always be OSI based but I find that a detailed understanding of OSI
gives great insight into the issues around creating distributed applications.

Better yet ... there are even products.  Most computer vendors need some encouragement ..
but the products and implementation skills are growing.

This means that OSI has a future.

Alot of creativity and imagination has been invested in overlaying wonderful network 
structures on the Internet.  While this process is mature using the TCP/IP protocol suite
it is just beginning using OSI.  Time will tell which approach offers the most fertile
ground - but that is not the issue - it is the creative process that matters.  Diverse 
approaches and different ideas foster that creativity.

-----------[000059][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 01:30:09 GMT
From:      mogul@pa.dec.com (Jeffrey Mogul)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Berkeley packet filters - Where?

In article <398cbu$mgi@rockall.cc.strath.ac.uk> d.w.stevenson@ccsun.strath.ac.uk writes:
>Pointers to this software please.

Included as a standard feature of DEC OSF/1 (recent versions, anyway).

-Jeff

-----------[000060][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 04:29:31 GMT
From:      jbvb@elf.com (James VanBokkelen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

donp@novell.com (don provan) writes:

>In article <38ococ$lme@martha.utk.edu> hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu (Paul Hethmon) writes:
>>I know of two interpretations of this. One is the standard Unix
>>implemented style like wu-ftpd which also includes directories
>>as files. The other does not include directories in the reply.
 
>I've never heard of any implementation that didn't consider
>directories to be files for the purposes of NLST. Not returning the
>directories in the file listing would make it impossible to navigate
>down the directory tree.

The point is that each token in the output of NLST is supposed to be
directly useable as the argument of a GET or DELE command.  If a
server includes directories, it must be prepared to do something that
won't surprise the client in response to a GET of a directory.

>The more interesting question is whether the file names should include
>the path. I've always contended that a "name" sent out to a remote
>node would have to include the file's location since the remote
>node does not have enough information to construct a full name from
>the information it has. Unfortunately, this is definitely not common
>practice. In fact, I don't recall seeing any FTP server (other than my
>own) that returned, say, "/usr/include/stdio.h" as the file name in an
>NLST. Fortunately, this is not as much of an issue as it once was
>since most FTP servers these days present a UNIX style directory
>structure even when their native directory structure doesn't look like
>UNIX to local users. As this trend continues, the common practice of
>returing only the name in the local context (e.g., "stdio.h") in NLST
>will be less and less of a problem.

If a server prepends a path, this can cause difficulties for clients
who don't believe "all the world is Unix" (may Cthulu forfend).  For
MGET, the client needs to create a local filename, and there are
already enough incompatibilities between name formats, legal
characters, etc. without making the client scan for the rightmost '/'
and use only what remains.  See RFC 1123 (Host Requirements) at any
rate...

--
James B. VanBokkelen					Far Acres Farm
jbvb@{vax.ftp.com, asylum.sf.ca.us}			South Hampton, NH

-----------[000061][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 06:11:54 GMT
From:      jeffml@netcom.com (Jeff Lightfoot)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: how to tell the difference between class a,b,c ip's?

In article <399n3c$eh8@tools.near.net>,
Barry Margolin <barmar@nic.near.net> wrote:
>In article <398e3rINN108@twain.ucs.umass.edu> elf@twain.ucs.umass.edu (Michael J. Feuell) writes:
>>Now, if I have my info right so far, class C is for IP addresses that
>>start with 192-254, class A is 1-127, and class B is 128-191.
>
>Right.

Barry, where do class-D addresses fit in?  I don't have my books near me but
I thought class-C went up to 232ish (or something like that) and then there
were Class-D (reserved for future use) and maybe Class-E being a broadcast
of 255.255.255.255?  The whole point of this is where do these fit in that I
*thought* I read about?  I'm probably not even close but you are the
definitive source for this info! :-)
-- 

+---------------------------------------------+
| Jeff Lightfoot         jeffml@netcom.com    |
|                        light1@mactcf.af.mil |
+---------------------------------------------+
| ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/jeffml/jeffml.html |
+---------------------------------------------+

-----------[000062][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 07:48:17 GMT
From:      cdb@tph116.fkp.physik.th-darmstadt.de (Claus-Dieter Bredl)
To:        comp.unix.admin,comp.unix.questions,alt.unix.wizard,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Sending IP # to name server

[deleted]

if you insist in using "nslookup" ;-)

a) tell nslookup to return more than only IP numbers
   (e.g.: tell it to return "any" info)

b) use the ".in-addr.arpa" pseudo domain, appended to the
   order-reversed four numbers of the IP address in question
   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^!

example:
-----------------------snip------------------------------
tph116:~ $ nslookup
Default Server:  rs10.hrz.th-darmstadt.de
Address:  130.83.56.60

> set type=any
 
> tph116.fkp.physik.th-darmstadt.de
 
Server:  rs10.hrz.th-darmstadt.de
Address:  130.83.56.60

tph116.fkp.physik.th-darmstadt.de	internet address = 130.83.85.152
[... LAN-internal stuff deleted ...]

> 152.85.83.130.in-addr.arpa
 
Server:  rs10.hrz.th-darmstadt.de
Address:  130.83.56.60

152.85.83.130.in-addr.arpa	name = tph116.fkp.physik.th-darmstadt.de
> exit
tph116:~ $ 
------------------------------------snip------------------------------

hope this helps
CDB

-----------[000063][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 08:30:40 GMT
From:      mfendt@eso.org (Michael Fendt)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP-IP parameters for optimal use on T1/E1 satellite links

Hello,
we are currently upgrading our 64K satellite link to a 2MB link. 
To optimise the usage one has to fiddle with various (TCP/IP)Parameters.

Please correct me if the following ideas are wrong:

a) Considering my default TCP buffer sizes (4k on my sun) and the delay (~500ms) 
the best performance I will get is 64kbps (4k*8/0.5s) for a single TCP connection
(Which is fine for me now :-)

b) How far can I extend that window size (64k,32K limits depending on the type of
   machine i.e SUN,SGI,HP,IBM,DEC,PC or better the implementation of the TCP/IP?)
   I probably have to ask the manufacturer for that. 
   Anyway a buffer size of 64K limits to 256kbps for a single TCP connection,   
   considering the above scenario. Is this correct?

   So I have to look for implementations for RFC 1323. Any pointers on that?
   (is it avialable at all, widly used, or commercially avialable for ...)
   I assume that supercomputer centers have the same sort of problems
   (single TCP connections over huge bandwith*delay lines). Any pointers to
   documents are welcome too.

c) Does it make sense to adapt the TCP Maximum Segment Size (tcp_default_mss = 512)
   to the MTU of the connecting interfaces (i.e MTU (seriell)= MTU (ethernet))
   to avoid fragmentation on the routers?
   Assuming that I would hook up the routers (on each side) and the connected
   workstations on FDDI (MTU=4352) adapting TCP Maximum Segment Size and MTU on the
   seriell line would that improve the throughput?

So any help on that issue is welcome.

Thank you,

Michael Fendt
________________________________________________________________________________

Michael Fendt                             
ESO 
Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2                          
85748 Garching 
Germany

Tel: +49 89 32006 441
Fax: +49 89 32023 62

email: mfendt@eso.org



-----------[000064][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 14:16:23 UNDEFINED
From:      tim@apocalypse.org (Timothy G. Reynolds)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCPIP Compatibility Problems ? (FTP Software, Novell)

In article <LDAVIS.94Nov3133950@jaguar.vienna.itd.sterling.com> ldavis@jaguar.vienna.itd.sterling.com (Lynch Davis) writes:
>From: ldavis@jaguar.vienna.itd.sterling.com (Lynch Davis)
>Subject: TCPIP Compatibility Problems ? (FTP Software, Novell)
>Date: 03 Nov 1994 18:39:49 GMT
 
>I would like to know if anyone can tell me about any
>know problems with the FTP Software tcpip stack when 
>used on top of Novell Netware.  The date on the 
>netbind is 7-9-91, using an Excelan 215T ethernet
>card on a PS-2.

This depends on exactly what you mean by "used on top of".  FTP Software's 
PC/TCP will not run "on top" of Novell Netware.  It can run "alongside" 
Netware over another type of driver, however.  I'm going to assume that, since 
you mention netbind, you're using NDIS drivers and a Novell IPX for NDIS.  If 
this is the case, you need to be sure that you are loading the DIS_PKT.GUP 
converter in your config.sys and that you have added an appropriate [PKTDRV] 
section to your protocol.ini.  If you have the docs, please read the section 
on installing using an NDIS driver.

Timothy G. Reynolds					FTP Software, Inc.
Technical Services					2 High St.
timmi+email@ftp.com					N. Andover, MA
(800) 382-4FTP							01845

		"When the avalanche has already started, 
		 it is too late for the pebbles to vote."

-----------[000065][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 10:37:59 GMT
From:      srinivas@cy.cs.olemiss.edu (Tipirneni Srinivas)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Writing/reading to/from a socket.


Subject: 
Summary: 
Expires: 
Sender: srinivas@cy.cs.olemiss.edu 
Followup-To: 
Distribution: Distribution: world
Organization: CIS Dept., U of MS
Keywords: SOCKET
Cc: 

I am a newbie to networking. I wrote a simple program
that does :

a) Server writes to a socket. 
b) Client does nothing. It sleeps.
c) Server reads from the same socket.

All these are in infinite loop. I expected that server reads 
whatever 
anything.l

Could someone please explain this ...?
Thanks

Srini

--
Srinivas Tiopirneni


-----------[000066][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 11:07:57 GMT
From:      root@none.com (root)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   test

Please Ignore.

-----------[000067][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 09:34:44 +0100
From:      szymon@uci.agh.edu.pl (Szymon Sokol)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Tar in ftp

John Beardmore (wookie@wookie.demon.co.uk) wrote:
: In article <386vu1$5d5@pandora.sdsu.edu>
:            gcharles@ucssun1.sdsu.edu "Greg Charles" writes:
 
: >        Someone showed me that on ftp.mathworks.com you can type:
: >get directory.tar (while in binary mode) and it will tar up the whole
: >directory and send it to you.  How can I set up my ftp system to do
: >this?  Will other options, such as zip, work as well?
 
: I suspect they have hacked the source to add the feature. I don't think
: it's standard.

It is not standard in vendors' ftpd, but it is present in wuftpd - WUSTL ftpd 
(the one that runs at wuarchive.wustl.edu; sources are also available from 
there). It is probably the best FTP server software available.

: I don't think ZIPing has ever been done, though feel free to correct me by
: email if I'm wrong !

Not sure about ZIP (you mean, compression used in PKZIP program?), but wuftpd
can do 'compress' or 'gzip' (ie. .Z or .gz).

--
                        Szymon Sokol -- Network Manager
U     U M     M M     M University of Mining and Metallurgy, Computer Center
U     U MM   MM MM   MM ave. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow, POLAND
U     U M M M M M M M M TEL. +48 12 338100 EXT. 2885  FAX +48 12 338907
 UUUUU  M  M  M M  M  M finger szymon@galaxy.uci.agh.edu.pl for PGP key
                        WWW page: http://www.uci.agh.edu.pl/~szymon/

-----------[000068][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 12:02:55 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.ppp,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   Re: SLIP Termination

In article <CyMy3M.19y@ddwizard.Dundee.NCR.COM>, Ken.Adair@Dundee.NCR.COM (Ken Adair) writes:
|> I have an OS/2 PC running IBM's TCP/IP Version 2.0 (no CSDs). I wish to
|> run a couple of independent third party applications which will require 
|> the use of a SLIP connection. Each of the applications connect to the
|> same address and may or may not to run simultaneously. 
|> 
|> The problem is, I want to close the modem link when the last program has
|> completed. How can I detect when the SLIP line is in use and when the last 
|> program has finished with the SLIP connection?

In general, the only way to do this is with an inactivity timer.  IP is
not connection oriented, and it has no idea that there are applications
out there that may (or may not) require service in the future, so it
doesn't know when to tear down the connection.

If you're able to come up with this information by other means (for
example, by writing an application which forks all of the other
applications and uses SIGCHLD and wait3() to determine which processes
are done), then you can use this to kill off the SLIP process on your
end.

--
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000069][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 12:18:41 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: how to tell the difference between class a,b,c ip's?

In article <399n3c$eh8@tools.near.net>, barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin) writes:
|> In article <398e3rINN108@twain.ucs.umass.edu> elf@twain.ucs.umass.edu (Michael J. Feuell) writes:
|> >Now, if I have my info right so far, class C is for IP addresses that
|> >start with 192-254, class A is 1-127, and class B is 128-191.
|> 
|> Right.
|> 
|> >But what would the various netmasks be? For class C is it 255.255.0 ?
|> 
|> No.  Class A is 255.0.0.0, class B is 255.255.0.0, and class C is
|> 255.255.255.0.
|> 
|> >Will I ever encounter a a valid IP with less than 4 numbers in it?
|> 
|> No.  IP addresses are all 32 bits.  Each number is an 8-bit octet.

Not quite true.  The 4-number dotted-decimal form is most common, but
isn't the only method used to express these numbers.  Most BSD-derived
systems permit alternate expressions for dotted-decimal form:

	A		(32 bit unsigned decimal number)
	A.B		(A is first 8 bits, B is last 24 bits)
	A.B.C		(A is first 8 bits, B second 8, C last 16 bits)
	A.B.C.D		(all are 8 bits)

So, it's quite common to run into expressions such as "127.1", in which
the first number (127) represents the first octet of the IP address and
the second number (1) represents the last three octets.  This would be
equivalent to "127.0.1" and "127.0.0.1".

|> No, except that nodes can't use all 0's or all 1's in the host portion.
|> Some obscure network technologies require a direct mapping between the IP
|> host number and the hardware address, but most common ones don't have such
|> a requirement, and host numbers can be assigned arbitrarily.

Ha!  I like the use of the adjective there.  I feel the same about IPX.

|> >Is there any other info I should be aware of?
|> 
|> I think you should read up about TCP/IP in general.  Try the book
|> "Internetworking with TCP/IP".
|> 
|> >Lastly, what defines a valid IP address?
|> >So far all I have is that 1) contains 4 numbers, 2) each of those numbers
|> >must be greater than 0 and less than 255. (except localhost and the netmask)
|> 
|> Yes.

No, they must be greater than *or equal to* 0 and less than *or equal
to* 255.  In the A.B.C.D format, they're all 8 bit unsigned decimal
numbers.

There isn't any necessary restriction on the actual values because it
isn't necessarily the case that the subnet mask will end on an octet
boundary.  Thus, depending on the network organization, 12.0.5.255 could
be a proper IP address.

--
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000070][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 14:18:42
From:      padgett@goat.orl.mmc.com (Padgett 0sirius)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: how to tell the difference between class a,b,c ip's?

Well, the postings seen thusfar are close but not quite right. The current
source is RFC 791 (don't think it has been superceeded) and the drill is
as follows:

IP addresses are made up of four octets in the range 0-255.
If the MSB is zero, it is a class A address - 7 bits net identifier, 24 bits 
   local address.
   except 127 (0111 1111) is for local loopback use only and should never 
   appear on the net.

If the MS two bits are 10 it is a class B address - 14 bits network 
   identifier, 16 bits local address.
If the MS three bits are 110 it is a class C address - 21 bits network, 8 
   bits local address.
If the MS three bits are 111 it is "escape to extended addressing mode"

Further: Network identifier of all zeros means "this network" 
         Local address of all ones means "everybody"
         Subnets are made up by slitting the "local address" into a MSP
          as the subnet ID and LSP as the node ID - does not have to
          be an even split. (P-part)

Put them all together and they spell mo... er as you can see it is not quite
orderly but class A is 1-126, B is 128-191, and C is 192-223.

			A. Padgett Peterson, P.E.
                        Cybernetic Psychophysicist
			   We also walk dogs
	 	       PGP 2.7 Public Key Available

-----------[000071][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 21:12:43 -0500
From:      gmichaud@gandalf.ca (Guy Michaud)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.admin,comp.sys.novell
Subject:   multicast/broadcast data transfer to multiple hosts/destinations


I'm looking for a software that can make use of TCP/IP-UDP sockets; permitting
the data transfer from one host on the net to be picked up simultaneously by
two other hosts.  This eliminates the need to transfer the file twice:

Conventional:

	filename @ host A
	tftp filename from host A to host B
	tftp filename from host A to host C

Wanted:
	??? filname

All hosts programed to 'listen' for the multicast/broadcast would receive the 
data on a specific tcp/udp port or socket.  The software in each listening host
(host B and C), would keep track of missing packets, and could then send out
a re-transmission request to the sending host.

Why would I want to do this?  The file I need to transfer is 2 to 10 Gbytes.
Transferring to each host (2 'listening' hosts = 2 times the time to 
transfer.) would take too long.  Also, considering that I will be crossing
networks:

	host A, net 1
	host B, net 2
	host C, net 3

The only way to get from net A to net C is through net B.

Any one have any idea?  Would this be useful product?  Have I stirred anyone's
imagination?

All ideas, pointers would be appreciated.  Respond here or through e-mail
(gmichaud@charm.gandalf.ca).

Guy


-----------[000072][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 13:21:53 GMT
From:      euamhk@eua.ericsson.se (Henrik Martin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sys.sun.misc
Subject:   [Q]: How to change ACK timeout in TCP driver?

Hi! Our networking guy asked me to find out if it was possible to
change the timeout value for retransmitting a TCP packet. The reason
that he wants to do this is because one project at our site has TCP
applications that run over WANs through several bridges, routers, etc.
over a 64Kbps line. He has looked with a sniffer and seen some kind of
wobbling on the net with lots of retransmissions because of delayed
ACKs.

He wasn't sure if the OS was SunOS 4.x or SunOS 5.x (Solaris 2.x) on
the machines involved but I'm pretty sure that they run SunOS 4.x.

In the book TCP/IP Illustrated by Richard Stevens, a few TCP-related
kernel variables are mentioned in the appendices. I found something
called "tcp_rexmit_interval_min" for Solaris that is supposed to mean
"minimum retransmit timeout interval".

My question is:

Is this the right variable to tweak in this case?

If the answer to the question above is yes, then:

What's the corresponding variable name in SunOS 4.x (if there is one)?
I tried "nm /vmunix | grep tcp_" to see if there was a similar symbol
name but I was out of luck :-(


Any help would be much appreciated.  Please reply by email since I
don't have time to read news very often.


Thanks and best regards,

Henrik Martin 
Ellemtel Telecommunication Systems Laboratories Sweden
Office phone: + 46 8 727 36 04 Fax: + 46 8 647 82 76
Email: Henrik.Martin@eua.ericsson.se
















-- 
Henrik Martín                     | 
Networked UNIX systems support    | "emacs is a fine operating system, 
Email: euamhk                     |  but I still prefer UNIX"
Tel  : 3604                       |

-----------[000073][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 13:28:48 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ICMP Traceroute VS IP Record Route?

In article <peter.lewis-2910941338500001@rocky.curtin.edu.au> peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis) writes:
>Yes.  The "record route" option requires that the routers along the route
>actually pay attention to this option.  Maybe they do these days, but
>traditionally this has been a serious problem with this option.  Also,

Record Route is OPTIONAL in RFC1122 so its not of great real use. The
standard ICMP error trick used by conventional traceroute is at least a
SHOULD.

Alan
-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000074][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 03 Nov 94 20:30:14 PDT
From:      freeman@mr.net
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Help: SLIP from MS Windows to AIX


Hello All,

Has anyone here configured a SLIP link via modem from a PC to a RS/6000?  I had 
previously setup SLIP between two RS/6000 via a null modem cable and that works 
fine.  Now I'm using the Chameleon package on the PC under WFWG 3.11 and I have 
two identical MultiTech modems on both end.  The modem will dial and connect, 
slattach on AIX will say connection established, but PING will fail.

Thanks for any advice.

---------------------------------
Alex Li
Health Systems Integration, Inc.
612-851-9696
---------------------------------

-----------[000075][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 14:28:37 GMT
From:      mikep@mfa.com (Mike Passineau)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   WANTED-bootp info utility

Hello!

I am looking for a utility similar in operation to
the icmpinof utility that I can run from a host
system (HPUX v9.04) that will monitor and display
bootp requests as they come into the host, and
display some useful information in regard to
rarp and ip.

If anyone can point me to such a utility I would
be grateful!!

Best regards. . . .   Mike

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Michael A. Passineau			McHugh-Freeman
System Administrator			Technical Services Group
mikep@mfa.com				
finger above for my PGP public key.

"Mind, like parachute, not working when not open." [Charlie Chan]

#include <std_disclaimer.h>
----------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000076][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 14:30:39 GMT
From:      jk@beach.cis.ufl.edu (Jagadeesh Kasaraneni)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   How to multicast using dlpi interface in Solari env?


Hi,

In the project I am working on, I need to use dlpi interface in Solaris environment to
access the underlying device connected to the ethernet. I need to send and receive packets
over the net. I have to do multicasting, add and delete a multicast address etc. I
don't have any documentation and all I have is an example program which reads packets
on the interface. I was able to read packets successfully but I am having problems with
writing packets. If any of you have any examples which write packets, which use 
multicasting, etc, I would love to take a look at them. If you have a postscript format
of the documentation or the documentation itself I request you to share them with me, if
possible.

Since I rarely read the newsgroups from the place I work, please mail your replies to the
following address: jk@cis.ufl.edu.

	Thanks 
	Jagadeesh Kasaraneni.

-----------[000077][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 16:20:14
From:      ab429@osfn.rhilinet.gov (Justin Monti)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Putting school network on Internet via SLIP

In article <rrwood-301094203938@bpci.net3.io.org> rrwood@io.org (Roy Wood) writes:
>From: rrwood@io.org (Roy Wood)
>Subject: Re: Putting school network on Internet via SLIP
>Date: Sun, 30 Oct 1994 20:39:38 -0500
 
>In article <783261850snz@wookie.demon.co.uk>, wookie@wookie.demon.co.uk
>(John Beardmore) wrote:
 
>> In article <ab429.44.0036C09A@osfn.rhilinet.gov>
>>            ab429@osfn.rhilinet.gov "Justin Monti" writes:
>> 
>> >Hello all.  My high school is considering putting its Macintosh student 
>> >network (and eventually the admin PC network also) on the Net.  What I am 
>> >trying to figure out is if it will be possible to get a connection through a 
>> >local service provider and have the ability to assign each computer its own IP 
>> >address (using MacTCP).
>> 
>> Why do this dynamically ?
 
>Because it's probably a public lab of compact Macs, which means it's a zoo
>where assigning static addresses will be a nightmare.  Better to give each
>kid an "Information Superhypeway" disk that is customized with
>userid/password for the POP server, and assign IP addresses dynamically as
>each kid appears on the network.  The alternative (static addressing) means
>that each kid's startup disk has a unique IP address more-or-less
>hard-coded, and if there are more than 254 such users, things could get
>messy.....

You're right.  We have about 400 students who have access to the computing 
facilities and who would probably want to use the Net.  There are also another 
50 or so faculty who would do the same.  It's just not practical to use static 
ip addressing.  Also, there would probably be more than 254 computers turned 
on at any time on the campus, but only a small fraction would need Internet 
access at any one time.  Therefore dynamic addressing is much more attractive. 
 Also, I doubt that we would be able to get more than 1 class c address.

>> >  We would have a maximum of 100 computers on-line at a 
>> >time (BOOTP is a possibility, but I'd rather avoid it).  One Mac will be 
>> >dedicated as the router (and WWW server, mail server, FTP server, gopher 
>> >server).
>> Why a MAC ?
 
>Can a Mac do all those things?  I know about FTPd, but the other stuff is
>news to me (not that I've been paying attention to that).  And what about
>NNTP?  Why not go with a unix box?

I'd love to go with a DOS or Unix box (although I confess to having very 
little knowledge of Unix) for the gateway/router.  However, because I won't be 
spending the rest of my life at the school, the system needs to be 
admisisterable (is that a word?) by the staff in the computer center who are 
strict Macaholics.  We aren't going to need to have a NNTP server because we 
can use either the NNTP server of our service provider or the NNTP server of 
one of the Universities in the state.

>-Roy (who is doing more or less the same thing)


>-- 
>rrwood@io.org
 
>"Live by the foma (harmless lies) that make you brave and kind, 
>happy and healthy."
 
>-Bokonon/K.Vonnegut


==================
Justin Monti
Painless Windows Consulting
email: 70254.2670@compuserve.com OR ab429@osfn.rhilinet.gov
Disclaimer: My opinions are not necessarily those of my employer
"Uh, huh, like, the net is cool" --Beavis & Butthead

-----------[000078][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 15:15:51 GMT
From:      johnam@bart.datastorm.com (johnam)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Telnet CR-LF translation on NetBSD

I've been trying to perform Telnet Zmodem transfers.  So far everthing
is working well receiving a file from the host.  However, if send a file,
rz doesn't work without the -e option (escape control characters).  Upon
investigation, NetBSD is translating the CR-LF of anything.  This seems 
rather strange considering I put Telnet into Binary mode (via the Telnet
option negotiation) before sending the file.  So how do I tell Telnet not
to do this translation?  Is there another Telnet option I'm missing?

While I'm at it, is there a standard document that outlines all of the
Telnet negotiations? 

Misc: I'm in the default character by character mode, the host is a
NetBSD 0.9 UNIX box.

thanks for any help that can be giving,
John Maier

-----------[000079][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 15:46:59 GMT
From:      RSPF48A@prodigy.com (KEVIN GILHOOLY )
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Broadcasting UDP packets

    I am developing an application in which one central program will have 
to feed an indeterminate number of others with copies of the same 
information. 
    I am trying to find a way to avoid having the many poll the one 
central machine. Is there a way to do a broadcast of packets to multiple 
machines? 
   I looked at IGMP, but I was told that it was a lot lower-level than I 
wanted to be. (Also, I don't think my TCP/IP stack [Chameleon for 
Windows] allows access that low down the stack anyway.)

Thanks!
-
Kevin Gilhooly  
e-mail: rspf48a@prodigy.com
#include <disclaimer.h>


-----------[000080][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 15:56:57 GMT
From:      field@cs.pitt.edu (Brian Field)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   UDP packets lost on src machine

I have a client program which generates small UDP packets (~20 bytes
UDP data) and sends them to a server.  This server responds by sending
(potentially) large numbers of UDP packets (up to 255 for each
request).  Now, at times, a UDP packet, as sent by the src, never gets
onto the wire.  I'm checking all system call return values, and the
packets getting lost do not receive errors via sendto ().  I'm
snopping the net, and these request packets aren't hitting the wire.
The problem is intermittent.  I may see 30-40 requests sent ok, then
one is dropped, and then the rest are sent ok.  (Both machines are on
the same LAN segment-- no bridges or routers between them).

What I would like to know (definitively) is what information can be
inferred from sendto() reporting that it has sent the number of bytes
expected?  Does this mean simply that the data was copied successfully
from user space into mbufs?  Can anything else be inferred?  I've run
netstat before and after these packets are getting lost and I'm not
seeing request for mbufs being denied.  I'm also not seeing oErrors
increasing (its my understanding that if the packet suffers through 16
collisions, it get dropped and Oerrors is incremented).

What types of information can I access if I use setsockopt () w/
SO_DEBUG?  And how do I get to this info?  Is there any other debuggin
information I should look at?

If I snoop on the src machine, can I expect reliable results?  (I
thought there was a problem with doing this..).  Do any public domain
snoopers show collisions (I'm capturing the packet stream between the
src and dst, but would also like to see collisions in this stream).

Ooops.  This is on an SGI Indy, Irix 5.2, over ethernet.

Thanks
Brian


-----------[000081][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 18:24:11 GMT
From:      nrg@netcom.com (Ethan I. Miller)
To:        comp.protocols.appletalk,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Appletalk->TCP/IP Router/Gateway

: I got the impression that since one Mac has a PPP connection, and MacTCP 
: doesn't do routing, you can't also connect that same machine to the local 
: ethernet (IP-wise) without first disconnecting the PPP link. In other 
: words, what is needed here is an IP router to allow the machine to access 
: both links at once.
 
: This could also be done through multi-homing (preventing the ethernet 
: from being 'live' on the Internet, for security or other reasons), but 
: you would still need to have the ANA allocate a (nominally) class C 
: network address to prevent the multi-homed host from getting confused, 
: even if the net wasn't visible to the rest of the world.
 
: The problem is that the only software (at least that *I* know of) that 
: will let you either route or be multi-homed on a Mac is AUX, which 
: doesn't show any signs of an upgrade path.
 
: If I dare say it, about your best bet would be to upgrade the PPP link to 
: full network routing, find an old 386-16 with a 100MB HD (probably could 
: be had for <$300-$400 these days), install Linux or FreeBSD (free "Unix" 
: for the x86) and configure it as a router, and then put your whole 
: network on the Internet live. Or, you could make it your "firewall" and 
: run the POP3 server on it, preventing having to expose the rest of the 
: network (whether that's good or bad depends on your own philosophy).
 
: Or, if you had an old mac sitting around (though they tend to be more 
: expensive than old PCs, and AUX isn't free) you could do the same with 
: AUX. Heck, you could put AUX on the machine that's PPP-linked now. But 
: the PC/FreeBSD approach keeps you in free software.
 
: Egads, I wrote a lot. ;) Have fun, and keep us updated.

Yeah full network routing keeps popping up as the best solution...It's jsut
that I'm such a Mac weenie that I'm determined to have a Mac (not under
AUX) doing as much (hopefully everything!) as possible. If not a software
IP router (thre's GOT to be one, and believe me -- the Apple Internet
Router is *not* it) then perhaps a box (like a shiva fast path, gator box
etc.) that sits on the ethernet providing IP and IP routing services... of
course thes guys cost *bucks*...sheesh I'm *so* close :)

thanks
ethan miller

-----------[000082][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      03 Nov 1994 18:39:49 GMT
From:      ldavis@jaguar.vienna.itd.sterling.com (Lynch Davis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCPIP Compatibility Problems ? (FTP Software, Novell)

I would like to know if anyone can tell me about any
know problems with the FTP Software tcpip stack when 
used on top of Novell Netware.  The date on the 
netbind is 7-9-91, using an Excelan 215T ethernet
card on a PS-2.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Lynch

-----------[000083][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      4 Nov 1994 10:32:00 -0800
From:      guy@nova.netapp.com (Guy Harris)
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

 <d.gibson@dtt.co.nz> wrote:
>* I gain all the advantages of the 1990's software technologies of OSI -
>abstraction, a more sophisticated layering of network services.  Routing,

Umm, "routing" isn't an "advantage of the 1990's software technology of
OSI"; it long antedates the work on the OSI stack.

>connection control,

What does "connection control" mean?

>a decent Transport Layer,

Precisely what is "indecent" about TCP?

-----------[000084][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 21:25:12 GMT
From:      zhao@ERC.MsState.Edu (Xiaodong Zhao)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   VMTP


Can anybody tell me something about VMTP? 
What kind of protocol is it?  Has it been standardized?
What's the current status?

Thanks in advance,
-zhao
ERC,MSU



-----------[000085][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 3 Nov 1994 23:37:36
From:      systex@hookup.net (Lawrence Levin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   dos program for rsh or rexec ?

Does anyone know where I can get a dos program that will do a 'rsh' or 'rexec' 
to a unix host system ??  Please e-mail response.  Summary will be posted to 
this news group.

TIA

Lawrence Levin

-----------[000086][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 03 Nov 1994 09:41:00 +0800
From:      peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: diff between passive and active mode ftp

In article <3971i7INNqqc@titan.ucs.umass.edu>, stos@titan.ucs.umass.edu
(stos) wrote:

>Could someone tell me the difference between Passive and active mode
>ftp?

Passive mode:

CLIENT: PASV
Server opens a passive connection
SERVER: 227 Entering Passive Mode (134,7,122,2,146,108)
  (first four bytes are the IP, next two are the port)
CLIENT: LIST/RETR/STOR command (any of the file/directory transfer commands)
Client connects (actively) to the specified IP/port (which might not be
the same IP as the client)

Active mode:

Client opens a passive connection
CLIENT: PORT 134,7,122,2,146,100
  (first four bytes are the IP, next two are the port)
SERVER: 200 PORT command successful.
CLIENT: LIST/RETR/STOR command (any of the file/directory transfer commands)
Server connects (actively) to the specified IP/port (which might not be
the same IP as the client)

Read the FTP RFC.

Note: Servers must support both.  Clients should (accoring to the later
RFC) use the PASV command.  In actual practice, clients should use the
PORT command and should offer the PASV command as an option.

Enjoy,
   Peter.
-- 
Peter N Lewis <peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au> - Macintosh TCP fingerpainter
FTP my programs from redback.cs.uwa.edu.au:Others/PeterLewis/ or
amug.org:pub/peterlewis/ or nic.switch.ch:software/mac/peterlewis/

-----------[000087][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 01:16:02 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.ppp,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   Re: SLIP Termination

In article <39ajhf$846@newhub.xylogics.com> carlson@xylogics.com writes:
>In article <CyMy3M.19y@ddwizard.Dundee.NCR.COM>, Ken.Adair@Dundee.NCR.COM (Ken Adair) writes:
 
> ...
>|> The problem is, I want to close the modem link when the last program has
>|> completed. How can I detect when the SLIP line is in use and when the last 
>|> program has finished with the SLIP connection?
>
>In general, the only way to do this is with an inactivity timer.  IP is
>not connection oriented, and it has no idea that there are applications
>out there that may (or may not) require service in the future, so it
>doesn't know when to tear down the connection.

In the UNIX implementations I know about, the SLIP code knows no more
about IP (which has no connections) than about TCP (which does have
connections).  However, more than one SLIP and PPP implementation snoops
on the packets going by and infers whether or not any TCP connections
are active.  It's "just" a matter of counting and matching SYN, FIN,
and RST bits.  Since it's not entirely reliable, you only use that
information to adjust your timeouts, using shorter or longer ones
depending on whether you think there are active connections.  I find 5
and 30 seconds are good values.

Note this works even when neither end of the TCP connection is on your box.


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000088][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      4 Nov 1994 03:00:38 GMT
From:      agulbra@nvg.unit.no (Arnt Gulbrandsen)
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

In article <39dkgn$os7@orinocho.dtt.co.nz>,  <d.gibson@dtt.co.nz> wrote:
>The rate at which IPv4 is being implemented on the network probably outstrips the rate
>at which IPv6 can be applied.

The rate at which IPv4 is being implemented proves that a protocol
can be implemented that fast, and so: If IPv6 is better than IPv4 it
can be implemented faster.

>The IPng migration will likely be a major exercise.

Yes.  But doable, if people upgrade their OSes and so on at least
once every three or four years (the latest I've heard is that IPv6
should be available from OS vendors three or four years before IPv4
is unusable).

--Arnt

-----------[000089][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 04 Nov 1994 17:39:01 -0800
From:      jim@ttech.com (Jim Wayda)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   BSD TCP/IP Routing Internals

I am trying to understand the internals of the routing code located in the
BSD sources in the following modules:

route.c
radix.x

This seems to be the most complex piece of code in the TCP/IP sources. If
someone knows where there may be some documentation or is knowledgeable in
this area, please contact me.

thanks,

-Jim

jim@ttech.com

-----------[000090][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 17:07:14 +0800
From:      s11976@ctsc.hkbc.hk (PM Wong)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.aix
Subject:   How to start bootpd explicitly on AIX

There were times when the bootpd daemon did not start (i.e. it didn't come
out from  /etc/inetd even when the bootpd entry is in inetd.conf)
or might have simply died and did not restart. What can be the causes ?
So I  started it explicitly by typing
/etc/bootpd /etc/bootptab
but it still did not appear when I did the
ps -ef | grep bootpd 

Is that the right way to force start bootpd on a unix (or AIX to be
mroe specific) machine  
--

                    \\\//
                    (o o)
[----------------ooO-(_)-Ooo---------------] PM Wong (Computer Officer)
[User User User User User User User User Us] CTSC Hong Kong Baptist College
[ser User User User User User User User Use] 224 Waterloo Road, Kln. HONGKONG
[er User User User User User User User User] Voice: (852)3397425  Fax: 3397888
[------------------------------------------] Email: pm@ctsc.hkbc.hk 


-----------[000091][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      4 Nov 1994 08:30:37 GMT
From:      eb@iunet.it (Enrico Badella)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.protocols.smb,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Accessing LAN Manager resources through a router

Hi,

My PC is uses Microsoft Lan Manager (2.2 I think) to access resources
on a HP-9000 server using LMU. Now I came accros the need of accessing other
resources on a similar server that is on a different subnet separated
by a router (also HP). I have tried configuring my lmhosts, hosts files
but with no result.

Using tcpdump I managed to look at what my PC sends out and discovered
that it will always does a broadcast on the subnetwork it's on instead
of using the address of the server on the other side of the network.

I called HP support and they told me that this is how Lan Manager is 
supposed to work. So how can I use something on the other side of the
router wall?  Browsing through the manuals I saw there is a
replication service, but I couldn't get my sysadm to try setting it up.

Any suggections?

Thanks in advance


-----------[000092][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 04 Nov 94 15:43:37 EST
From:      stein@gcomm.com
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: how to tell the difference between class a,b,c


IB>>Now, if I have my info right so far, class C is for IP addresses that
IB>>start with 192-254, class A is 1-127, and class B is 128-191.

IB>Right.

Actually class C is 192-223 in the first octet, according to Stevens'
TCP/IP Illustrated Volume 1, page 8.  RFC791 states that Class C
addresses must start with 110xxxxx, in binary.  There's class D (224-239)
for multicast.  The rest are for "expansion" (E=240-247, etc.).

-- Bob Stein, Galacticomm

--
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
 | . The Galacticomm Demo System - 305.583.7808 - Home of The Major BBS . |
 | . Telnet/FTP: gcomm.com (199.227.15.16) - WWW: http://www.gcomm.com/ . |
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------


-----------[000093][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 21:36:24 +0800
From:      csckhg@dlsu.edu.ph (Kelsey Hartigan Go)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: PPP problems at work (help!)

: My offices has two machine set up as PPP sites.  If I
: connect to either one of them, the only site I can ping
: or telnet to is the machine I just dialed into.
 
: I am convinced the problem is with the machines I'm 
: connecting to, but I'm having a hard time convincing
: the system administration people here of that.
 
: I called the Chameleon customer support line, and they
: believe my offices' machines are not set up as "routers"
: But the SysAdm people here "claim" the machines are set
: up correctly.

perhaps the PPP server is not
broadcasting the routing information to the rest of the world and hence
the rest of the world does not know the route to your machine.
Usually, it's RIP, but it may be different on your site (like OSPF?)
 

-----------[000094][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      3 Nov 1994 21:40:06 +0800
From:      csckhg@dlsu.edu.ph (Kelsey Hartigan Go)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: PC based PD Ethernet/TCPIP sniffer?

Russell Nelson (nelson@crynwr.crynwr.com) wrote:
:    Title says it all.  Anybody know of one?  I've already chased down
:    the leads for that foreign product alternately named 'fergie',
:    'gobbler', and at least one name that escapes me right now.  That
:    product is aimed at packet measurement - not decode.

I've seem to come across a program called NETWATCH developed at MIT.
This program just allows you to view the packets whizzing by, but 
optionally, you can save these packets to disk (but you do lose some
packets) and use some weird binary file viewer such as MS-DOS DEBUG.


-----------[000095][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      4 Nov 1994 11:33:37 -0000
From:      jpm@gin.pfm-mainz.de (Jan-Piet Mens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.dcom.lans,de.comm.internet
Subject:   Are these routes possible ?

I need your help for a few moments, please!

I have been assigned two subnets (192.109.x.96) and (192.109.x.224), where
'x' is identical in both cases. The netmask is 255.255.255.248 (fffffff8)
My network (so far) consists of an SCO Unix 3.2 and a Sun with SUN-OS 4.1.1,
together with sundry PCs and Printers on the network.

What I would like to do, is to have these two subnets act as one, running
on the same Ethernet cable. I have a router to the outside world with addr
192.109.x.100 which should be accessed by all hosts in my network. The router
runs PCROUTE onto transfer-net 193.141.y.109

What I have done so far:

The SCO-box is .97
The Sun-box is .225

on SCO, the following tables work fine. I have exactly what I want.
	Routing tables
	Destination      Gateway           Flags    Refs     Use  Interface
	127.0.0.1        127.0.0.1         UH          7        0 lo0
	193.141.y.109    192.109.x.100     UGH         0        0 wdn0
	default          192.109.x.100     U           2       60 wdn0
	192.109.x.96     192.109.x.97      U          12    13756 wdn0

On SUN I have
	Routing tables
	Destination          Gateway            Flags    Refcnt Use        Int
	127.0.0.1           127.0.0.1           UH       1      1395       lo0
	default             192.109.x.97        UG       0      0          ei0
	192.109.x.224       192.109.x.225       U        10     21499      ei0

On SCO I added

	# route add 192.109.x.224   192.109.x.225   1

	I could then ping the Sun.

On Sun I added

	# route add 192.109.x.97   192.109.x.225   0	; ping .97 works
	# route add 192.109.x.101  192.109.x.225   0	; ping .101 works

	I have to add routes to each host in the .96 network to be able to
	reach them. It works though.


So far so good (as far as I can tell anyway :-).
When I try to ping the outside world, the router starts transferring packets
like mad! to the other side, and nothing ever comes back. I don't understand,
since the Sun routes default to .97 (SCO) and it in turn routes default to
the router, why does it not work ?
Note, that from the .97 everything works as desired.

The configuration of PCROUTE is:

	******* PCroute starting *******
	Interface 1 (ethernet)
	    Address  192.109.x.100
	    NetMask 255.255.255.248
	    Flags     000FH
	    Metric    0000H
	    The Ethenet Address 0000H
	    The Ethenet Address C028H
	    The Ethenet Address D167H
	Interface 2 (ethernet)
	    Address 193.141.y.109
	    NetMask   255.255.255.0
	    Flags     000FH
	    Metric    0000H
	    The Ethenet Address 0000H
	    The Ethenet Address FBAAH
	    The Ethenet Address 0061H
	STATIC ROUTES
	    Route to network         0.0.0.0
	    Through gateway  193.141.y.109
	    Metric 0000H
	    Flags  0000H
	 
	Forwarding BOOTP requests to               0.0.0.0
	Logging messages to SYSLOGD on host         0.0.0.0
	Logging level 0000H
	Logging mask 0000H
	******* PCroute closing log file *******


Is what I am trying to do at all possible ? (Why don't I get one subnet with
more hosts ? I am trying to avoid reconfiguring everything :-)
Can I have two subnets on one ethernet cable ?
What routing (route add ...) entries are missing where ?
Must the router (pcroute) be reconfigured (hints pleaseeeee) ?

Thank you very much.
Regards,
	Jan-Piet
-- 
    __  _____   __  __ 
   |  ||  _  \ |  \/  |    Jan-Piet Mens                   Tel: +49-171-8033011
 __|  ||  ___/ |      |    Haendelstrasse 19               Fax: +49-521-9225924
|_____||__|    |__||__|    D-33604 Bielefeld               jpm@gin.PFM-Mainz.DE

-----------[000096][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 12:00:53 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: IP implementation or keep IPX?

In article <NEWTNews.17586.783579606.leo@apache.elmail.co.uk> Leo.Smith@elmail.co.uk writes:
>a LAN protocol, fast but not very resilient. TCP/IP is a WAN protocol. Slower 
>but reliable. NFS which is the IP standard file sharing protocol is a complete 
>can of worms in a MAC or PC environment. 

For PC environments its much simpler to use W4WG the free microsoft tcp/ip
stack and run lan manager over IP. The unix server software (SAMBA) is
handily free (see comp.protocols.smb) and does browsing and Windows NT
long name support etc. For apples get CAP installed on your unix systems
(also free) and you can export appletalk direct from unix too.

Alan
-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000097][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 15:35:47
From:      mscarton@mudshark.sunquest.com (Mark A. Scarton)
To:        comp.databases.sybase,comp.client-server,comp.databases,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.aix
Subject:   Developer Positions in Salt Lake City, Utah

Senior Software Developers

Sunquest, a leader in Clinical Information Systems, offers excellent opportunities for two
Senior Software Developers with our Research and Development group at our
location in Salt Lake City.  Our group is exploring the frontiers of clinical
information technology in hospitals throughout the United States and Canada.

To qualify, you must have a BS in Computer Science or equivalent (prefer an MS), 
8+ years development experience in computer science, 6+ years experience in C
language programming, and a background  as a lead developer.  Knowledge of
UNIX, sophisticated development tools, and the current state-of-the-art
computer industry is essential.

One position requires 6+ years with server/middleware development platforms, including
DCE, 5+ years utilizing TCP/IP communications including socket-based
programming, 3+ years in C++ language programming, and 1+ years with UNIX
Shell languages programming.  Must have expertise in Open System standards
including POSIX.  Prefer a background with communication, DCE and UNIX system
administration, particularly AIX and/or HP systems, and PC skills.  
[Job# SLC-1]

A second position requires 5+ years experience with relational DBMS, 2+ years in 
medical informatics or standards and with UNIX shell languages, and 1+ years
in C++ language programming and the Sybase R:DBMS.  Ideal candidate will have
a background in the medical informatics industry, PC literacy, and strong data
base administration skills from schema development through modelling and
performance analysis and tuning.
[Job# SLC-2]

We offer a competitive compensation and benefits package.  Please forward resume 
and cover letter, indicating job code, to: Sunquest, Human Resources, 4801 E.
Broadway, Tucson, AX 85711.  EOE


Mark A. Scarton, ABD
Sunquest Information Systems
4505 South Wasatch Blvd, Suite 100
Salt Lake City, Utah  84124-4787

-----------[000098][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 14:26:36 GMT
From:      RINGEISK@roche.com (Kim Ringeisen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP/IP vs. IPX on WAN

In article <CxzvHL.8GH@maestro.maestro.com> fpjones@maestro.maestro.com (Frank Jones) writes:
>Newsgroups: comp.protocols.tcp-ip
>Path: mailgate.roche.com!newsserver.jvnc.net!howland.reston.ans.net!pipex!uunet!maestro!fpjones
>From: fpjones@maestro.maestro.com (Frank Jones)
>Subject: TCP/IP vs. IPX on WAN
>Message-ID: <CxzvHL.8GH@maestro.maestro.com>
>Organization: Maestro Technologies, Inc.
>X-Newsreader: TIN [version 1.2 PL0]
>Date: Thu, 20 Oct 1994 23:20:09 GMT
>Lines: 1





-----------[000099][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      4 Nov 1994 23:25:36 -0500
From:      gwright@connix.com (Gary Wright)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Raw Sockets & Interface Selection?

Vinnie <vinnie@pocono.microserve.com> wrote:
>Is there a way to specify a particular network interface to send
>outgoing packets to? 

For BSD based systems:

If the *destination* is on the other end of a point-to-point link
or on a directly connected network, the SO_DONTROUTE socket option
causes IP to bypass the routing tables and send the packet on
the appropriate interface.  Otherwise, the routing tables are consulted.

If you are feeling really ambitious, you can can construct your
own frame and use a BPF device to queue the frame on the appropriate
interface.  For example, for an Ethernet interface, you would have
to construct the Ethernet, IP, and UDP header to send the datagram.

-----------[000100][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      4 Nov 1994 15:08:39 GMT
From:      mikep@mfa.com (Mike Passineau)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Packet analyzer for HPUX

Hello!

I am looking for a public domain packet decoder/analyzer
that can monitor ip or MAC addresses and capture TCP/IP
ethernet info for analysis.  If anyone knows of a site
for such a utility please Email me directly.

Thanks and best regards. . .  Mike

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Michael A. Passineau			McHugh-Freeman
System Administrator			Technical Services Group
mikep@mfa.com				
finger above for my PGP public key.

"Mind, like parachute, not working when not open." [Charlie Chan]

#include <std_disclaimer.h>
----------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000101][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      4 Nov 1994 15:37:45 GMT
From:      d.gibson@dtt.co.nz
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

In article <399b6j$66k@nntp.Stanford.EDU> Dave Crocker <dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu> writes:
>but what about USE?  please provide details.

I gave some examples - Telephone Company management networks.
If you want come concrete examples ... talk to DEC or IBM.

>
>>These are Big, Serious, Ugly, Fat networks that eat SNMP for
 breakfast.  They are
>>built on "industrial strength" CMIP.
>
>Pray tell, Kelly.  What is the meaningful difference between the two,
>except for massively larger complexity to CMIP and massively smaller
>deployment.

The advantages of CMISE are:

* true object orientation.  This means my agents model systems in a true
object oriented way - none of this "object type" stuff.   This means I 
gain the advantages of polymorphism and inheritance.  I can specialise
from defined network object classes and use GDMO guidelines to insure
strict inheritance.  My solution should be both scalable and maintainable
- very good attributes for complex systems.

* Being able to create "events" rather than rely on a remote "poll" makes
my agents far more functional.  An architecture for event forwarding disrimination
and logging - based on object technologies - allows me to create very powerful
management applications.

* I gain all the advantages of the 1990's software technologies of OSI - abstraction,
a more sophisticated layering of network services.  Routing, connection control, a
decent Transport Layer, advanced "converstation" control, negotiated presentation
syntax.

If telephone companies based their management systems on SNMP this would amount
to them providing their services for free.   At least those services that still
worked would be provided for free.

If you had, as a goal, the idea of "flying to the moon" would you go out and buy
an airplane and begin enhancing it?  Of course not.  The Internet is a bit like
this - it has grown so fast that the problems and limitations of its original
design _REQUIRE_ a major change in peoples thinking.

My access provider thinks nothing of taking the gateway system down for changes during
prime time (a couple of hours about once a month).  This is incredible in a PTT 
culture!

The rate at which IPv4 is being implemented on the network probably outstrips the rate
at which IPv6 can be applied.  The IPng migration will likely be a major exercise.
I would suggest that with the "granularity" of Federation on the network - coordinating
the various system administrators is a bit like herding cats - it is not done easily.

Why not fit a (possibly complex) solution to a complex problem.  After all a good system
(if complex) is also functionally rich.  The ISO/ITU-T have many solutions to problems
that the Internet community are facing.  Focusing on software technologies of the 1970's
and seeking simple, quick (calling it elegant) solutions cannot work forever. 

-----------[000102][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      4 Nov 1994 18:06:28 GMT
From:      Dave Crocker <dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu>
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

It's interesting to see how often your line of thinking crops up over
the years and how often it doesn't seem to win:

In article <39dkgn$os7@orinocho.dtt.co.nz> , d.gibson@dtt.co.nz writes:
>I gave some examples - Telephone Company management networks.

The PTTs have an environment which is largely subject to end-to-end
monolithic control; they also have a funding model that makes big,
expensive solutions feasible.  This does not match true open systems
networkin realities.  Hence, we need to be careful in using the PTTs
as an example.

>* true object orientation.  This means my agents model systems in a
true

This is a recent piece of assertion from the CMIP community.  It
largely
isn't true.  The specification process has not been object/method
oriented.  The CMIP MIB was developed long after its operations. 
Operations
involve considerable complexity and emulate pseudo-data base work.

The protocol requires a connection, which is highly unstable in a
problematic network.  Implementation overhead for CMIP is quite high,
making it a very poor choice in small and cost-sensitive devices.

All of this was debated at great length and with much pain 5 years
ago.  The choice was SNMP.

By the way, it's worth noting that some telecom vendors use SNMP,
also.

>* Being able to create "events" rather than rely on a remote "poll"
makes

SNMP has events, it's just that the culture tries to avoid using them.
 Using events requires much cleverness on the part of the managed
 host.  There was an explicit decision in the SNMP community to limit
 the load on the managed entity, at the expense of the managing entity.
 
>* I gain all the advantages of the 1990's software technologies of
 OSI - abstraction,
>a more sophisticated layering of network services.  Routing,
 connection control, a
>decent Transport Layer, advanced "converstation" control, negotiated
 presentation
>syntax.

Huh?  OSI technology is NOT 1990s technology.  It is early 1980's
technology, pretty much the same as the Internet stuff, but without
the benefit of much operational experience or incremental revision.
Further, it embodies a 'big system' design mentality.  Costly,
difficult
to implement, etc.
 
>this - it has grown so fast that the problems and limitations of its
 original
>design _REQUIRE_ a major change in peoples thinking.

sounds reasonable, but what does this actually mean, concretely?

>My access provider thinks nothing of taking the gateway system down
for changes during

As was pointed out, this has nothing to do with technology.  It's
just bad operations.  Change providers.

>The rate at which IPv4 is being implemented on the network probably
 outstrips the rate
>at which IPv6 can be applied.  The IPng migration will likely be a
major exercise.

Definitely major.  But also designed to allow interworking with the
existing IPv4 community.  

>(if complex) is also functionally rich.  The ISO/ITU-T have many
 solutions to problems
>that the Internet community are facing.  Focusing on software
technologies of the 1970's

No, they have many DESIGNS and many claims.  This is quite different
from having tested solutions in the mixed and cantakerous world of
open systems networking.  The difference between design work and
operations
work is a hallmark of distinction.

--------------------
Dave Crocker
Brandenburg Consulting                          Phone:  +1 408 246 8253
675 Spruce Dr.                                  Fax:    +1 408 249 6205
Sunnyvale, CA  94086               Email:  dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu

-----------[000103][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 18:27:18 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: PC based PD Ethernet/TCPIP sniffer?

In article <NELSON.94Nov1103819@crynwr.crynwr.com> nelson@crynwr.crynwr.com (Russell Nelson) writes:
>Mmmm, there hasn't been a lot of work on a free packet decoder for
>PCs.  Someone might port tcpdump if they get bored.  The best decoder
>is netwatch, which hasn't been updated in at least four years.  Look
>on netlab1.usu.edu for pcip96.zip.

Or if you are educational or pay the shareware fee there is KA9Q which has
trouble tracing a heavy ethernet but with some small changes for a promisc
setting on the ethernet is a very good tcp/ip tracer (no use for non IP
however).

I use tcpdump under Linux - its all nice and free 8)

Alan


-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000104][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 94 19:11:53 GMT
From:      phardman@ssci.liv.ac.uk (Peter Hardman)
To:        comp.protocols.appletalk,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Appletalk->TCP/IP Router/Gateway

In Article <nrgCypF4B.89t@netcom.com>, nrg@netcom.com (Ethan I. Miller) wrote:

>If not a software
>IP router (thre's GOT to be one, and believe me -- the Apple Internet
>Router is *not* it) then perhaps a box (like a shiva fast path, gator box
>etc.) that sits on the ethernet providing IP and IP routing services... of
>course thes guys cost *bucks*...sheesh I'm *so* close :)
>

I you have to get a box then get a Caymen Gatorbox. My experiences with both
Fastpaths and Gatorboxes tells me that a Gatorbox is way ahead in the user
friendly stakes.

Peter

-----------[000105][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 19:24:05 GMT
From:      tmarsh@aero117.sca.loral.com (tmarsh)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   WANTED: Freeware tn3270

I am looking for a Freeware version of tn3270 for Sun OS.
And while we're at it how about tn3270 for a PC (DOS and Windows)?
Anyone? Anyone?

Thanks,
tmarsh

-----------[000106][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 20:30:22 GMT
From:      vnvybl8@server4.bell-atl.com (Mike Blansfield)
To:        comp.sys.hp.apps,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Traceroute Problems - HELP!

Hello,

I have been using the traceroute utility for years and find it
to be a very useful tool.  I have a problem with it though,
I would like to be able to do alternate source tracing using 
the -s option but I always get this error:

traceroute: bind:: Can't assign requested address

Why do I get this error and is this a bug or a feature?  Is there a
more recent port of traceroute? The version I'm using is 11/24/89.

The system I am running this on is an HP 9000/887 running 
HP-UX A.9.04.

Any help much appreciated!

Thanks,

Mike

=**= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =*= - =**=
Michael G. Blansfield  Bluestone, Open Systems Integration and Support Staff
1717 Arch Street (6S2), Philadelphia, PA 19103  
Voice Mail: (215)466-2131 or Voice Live: (908) 577-9863
Fax: (215)563-0517 E-mail: Michael.G.Blansfield@Bell-Atl.Com


-----------[000107][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 20:59:16 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

>The rate at which IPv4 is being implemented proves that a protocol
>can be implemented that fast, and so: If IPv6 is better than IPv4 it
>can be implemented faster.


It would be really swell if people would avoid word inflation.
Examples that bug me include:

    - "implement" a protocol, but not write any code or read any
	standards documents.
    - "design" a network, but not write any state machine descriptions
	or standards documents.
    - "engineer" a network, but not know the difference between a
	PDU and an ACK.

What is wrong with the words "choose", "install", "replace", "purchase",
"configure" "maintain", "watch", and "monitor"?

"IPv4 implemented?"  I thought the most recent major implementations
of IPv4 were almost 15 years ago.  It is already years too late for
IPv6 to be implemented as fast as IPv4 was implemented.


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000108][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 21:31:22 GMT
From:      steve@ecf.toronto.edu (Steve Kotsopoulos)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.admin,comp.sys.novell
Subject:   Re: multicast/broadcast data transfer to multiple hosts/destinations

Guy Michaud <gmichaud@gandalf.ca> wrote:
>
>I'm looking for a software that can make use of TCP/IP-UDP sockets; permitting
>the data transfer from one host on the net to be picked up simultaneously by
>two other hosts.  This eliminates the need to transfer the file twice:
>
>Conventional:
>
>	filename @ host A
>	tftp filename from host A to host B
>	tftp filename from host A to host C
>
>Wanted:
>	??? filname
>
>All hosts programed to 'listen' for the multicast/broadcast would receive the 
>data on a specific tcp/udp port or socket.  The software in each listening host
>(host B and C), would keep track of missing packets, and could then send out
>a re-transmission request to the sending host.
>
>Why would I want to do this?  The file I need to transfer is 2 to 10 Gbytes.
>Transferring to each host (2 'listening' hosts = 2 times the time to 
>transfer.) would take too long.  Also, considering that I will be crossing
>networks:
>
>	host A, net 1
>	host B, net 2
>	host C, net 3
>
>The only way to get from net A to net C is through net B.
>
>Any one have any idea?  Would this be useful product?  Have I stirred anyone's
>imagination?

We have already written something that does this.

It is called the Adaptive File Distribution Protocol.
It uses multicast and/or broadcast to distribute data to many hosts
simultaneously.  You can get more information at url:

	http://www.ecf.toronto.edu:/ecf/staff/steve/afdp/afdp.html
-- 
Steve Kotsopoulos  P.Eng.                         steve@ecf.toronto.edu
Systems Analyst,  Engineering Computing Facility, University of Toronto

-----------[000109][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 4 Nov 1994 22:20:48 GMT
From:      Venkat.V <venkat.venkatsubra@sandiegoca.ncr.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   bootp over a ether/fddi switch

Can you tell me how bootp is suppossed to work when i have the X-terminal on
an ethernat segment and the sever on an fddi segment and a ether/fddi switch
in-between ?. The X-Terminal sends bootp request  with "hardware type" as
1 ( ETHERNET) . The server on the fddi segment has the hardware type  as
8 (FDDI) in the entry for the X-terminal in its bootptab file. So when the 
server 
receives the bootp request , it finds a match for the hardware address but the 
hardware type don't match , so doesn't process the bootp request. 
                In bootptab file if i have the hardware type for the x-terminal 
entry as 1
(ETHERNET) , then won't bootp have a problem setting up arp ?.
                How are the two sides to know there is a bridge or switch in-between?.












-----------[000110][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 00:10:49 GMT
From:      ric@updike.sri.com (Richard Steinberger)
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Routing question:  Getting a Sun to route

	A remote user connects (from his Sun) to our network of Suns via PPP.
He has set the default route (in /etc/defaultrouter) to be the address
of the Sun he connects to.  He is able to telnet (and rlogin and
ping, etc) to our local Sun with no problems.  [The remote modem dials out,
the local one answers...].  But he would like to also be able to
connect to other machines on our net, using the the machine he
physically comes in on as a router.  This isn't working; that is, the
local machine isn't routing his incoming packets to other local machines.
[And packets aren't routed out the other way back to his machine either.]

	Can anyone help with a few details: First, is it possible for a Sun
(4.1.3) to do this routing for in incoming/outgoing PPP connection?  Second,
what is the form of the relevant route (or related) command?  An RTFM (which
M?) would be OK too.  Thanks in advance to all who reply.....

Ric Steinberger
ric@updike.sri.com

"For De Mille, young fur-henchmen can't be rowing!" Thomas Pynchon
                                                    Gravity's Rainbow






-----------[000111][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 5 Nov 1994 00:13:51 GMT
From:      donp@novell.com (don provan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In article <peter.lewis-0211941016140001@rocky.curtin.edu.au> peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis) writes:
>The original intention was to only list file names.  directory names are
>listed with the NDIR command.

First of all, discussing "original intention" in the same paragraph as
NDIR is somewhat misleading, since NDIR was only proposed several
years after the FTP spec was written. I'm not aware that NDIR has
actually been specified to this day, but I don't track FTP
developments as closely as I used to. The FTP server implementations I
checked don't even list NDIR as "unsupported".

Secondly, saying that NLST was only supposed list "file names" is not
as conclusive as one might think. In nearly every file system I've
ever encountered, directories *are* files, so it's be perfectly
natural to list their names along with the data files' names.

When you consider that navigation around a remote file system would be
virtually impossible via FTP if NLST didn't include subdirectories, I
find it very hard to believe that the original authors would have
been thinking that subdirectories shouldn't be including.

					don provan
					donp@novell.com

-----------[000112][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 13:46:27 -0800
From:      valko@cyberspace.com (Jack Valko)
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing question:  Getting a Sun to route

Richard Steinberger (ric@updike.sri.com) wrote:
: 	A remote user connects (from his Sun) to our network of Suns via PPP.
: He has set the default route (in /etc/defaultrouter) to be the address
: of the Sun he connects to.  He is able to telnet (and rlogin and
: ping, etc) to our local Sun with no problems.  [The remote modem dials out,
: the local one answers...].  But he would like to also be able to
: connect to other machines on our net, using the the machine he
: physically comes in on as a router.  This isn't working; that is, the
: local machine isn't routing his incoming packets to other local machines.
: [And packets aren't routed out the other way back to his machine either.]
 
: 	Can anyone help with a few details: First, is it possible for a Sun
: (4.1.3) to do this routing for in incoming/outgoing PPP connection?  Second,
: what is the form of the relevant route (or related) command?  An RTFM (which
: M?) would be OK too.  Thanks in advance to all who reply.....

You may want to look at in.routed to pass your routing information around 
your subnet.  Check the man page, and you may want to pay attention to how 
long routed waits before passing a route around your subnet.

Jack



-----------[000113][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 00:30:38 GMT
From:      fenner@cmf.nrl.navy.mil (William C. Fenner)
To:        comp.sys.hp.apps,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Traceroute Problems - HELP!

In article <CyrFMM.G6G@server4.bell-atl.com>,
Mike Blansfield <vnvybl8@server4.bell-atl.com> wrote:
>I would like to be able to do alternate source tracing using 
>the -s option but I always get this error:
>
>traceroute: bind:: Can't assign requested address

The argument to the "-s" option must be one of the interfaces of this
machine, i.e. it is only useful on multi-homed hosts to pick the outgoing
interface.  If you want to trace the path from point A to point B, you
can use the traceroute with the LSR option (I don't know if hp's has it or
not, if it doesn't you can get it from the sources to Stevens' book) and
"traceroute -g A B".  If all the hosts in between support it, you will
get the path from you to A to B.

  Bill
-- 
Bill Fenner                  fenner@cmf.nrl.navy.mil

-----------[000114][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 5 Nov 1994 00:52:33 GMT
From:      adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: how to tell the difference between class a,b,c ip's?

In article <padgett.267.000E503B@goat.orl.mmc.com>,
                Padgett 0sirius <padgett@goat.orl.mmc.com> wrote:

>Well, the postings seen thusfar are close but not quite right. The current
>source is RFC 791 (don't think it has been superceeded) and the drill is
>as follows:
>
>IP addresses are made up of four octets in the range 0-255.
>If the MSB is zero, it is a class A address - 7 bits net identifier, 24 bits 
>   local address.
>   except 127 (0111 1111) is for local loopback use only and should never 
>   appear on the net.
>
>If the MS two bits are 10 it is a class B address - 14 bits network 
>   identifier, 16 bits local address.
>If the MS three bits are 110 it is a class C address - 21 bits network, 8 
>   bits local address.
>If the MS three bits are 111 it is "escape to extended addressing mode"
>

1110 - isnt that the bit prefix for multicasting? - ie all remaining bit
ID the multicast group.

I think 11110 prefix is also used for something, but cant remember what.

>Further: Network identifier of all zeros means "this network" 

By convention in documentation. I think code takes it to mean undefined
machine. - ie not connected in the case of 0.0.0.0. Stupdily alot of
protocol stack use 255.255.255.255 for unknown host making it rather
difficult to ping machines on your local net other than by a directed
broadcast.

>         Local address of all ones means "everybody"

255.255.255.255 means all machines in nets to whioch you are directly
connected.

something like 158.152.255.255 can mean either all machines in net
158.152.0.0, or (all) subnets in net 158.152.0.0 depending upon
subnetting arangement (if any). You also get all machines on a subnet by
158.152.1.255 in the case of using 8 bits for subnet ID and 8 bit for
host ID.

I give the (all) like this as with some router, this could depend upon
inter-subnet connectivity - not sure.

Quite often, you find that if you do a directed broadcast ping to a
subnetted network, only one gateway will reply, rather than all as may
be expected, OTOH, doing the same to a non-subnetted network or a subnet
will achieve the desired result - ie a handy way of finding what
machines are alive on a given net/subnet. NOT A GOOD IDEA ON A LARGE NET
/ SUBNET as you will swamp the net.

>         Subnets are made up by slitting the "local address" into a MSP
>          as the subnet ID and LSP as the node ID - does not have to
>          be an even split. (P-part)

Usually - some people subnet their subnets, or peel of a single subnet
from a net - just to be awkward.

>
>Put them all together and they spell mo... er as you can see it is not quite
>orderly but class A is 1-126, B is 128-191, and C is 192-223.
>

and 127 for loop back, D: 224-239 for multicast group IDs. E: 240-247 I
think are used or reserved for something. No idea beyond that.

As a generic method for determining class, start at MS bit, and count
bits until a 0 bit is found, so you get A=0, B=1, C=2, D=3, E=4... etc
for future classes.

-- 
Adam

=======================================================================
| Computech  Tel/Fax: 0181 673 7817  email: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk |
=======================================================================

-----------[000115][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 5 Nov 1994 01:33:39 GMT
From:      Venkat.V <venkat.venkatsubra@sandiegoca.ncr.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: bootp over a ether/fddi switch

In my last posting i was erroneously mentioned the hardware type sent by the 
xterminal as 1 . It was 4  .
          










-----------[000116][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 01:43:37 GMT
From:      summit@ix.netcom.com (Summit '94)
To:        comp.dcom.isdn,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.lans.fddi,comp.dcom.lans.misc,comp.dcom.lans.token-ring,comp.dcom.servers,comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.sys.wellfleet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows,comp.os.ms-windows.nt.misc,comp.os.os2.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.os2.networking.misc
Subject:   Enterprise Management Summit '94 - New Product Announcements

                    Enterprise Management Summit '94
                      Santa Clara Convention Center
                             November 14-18
                           Phone:800.340.2111
                              415.512.0801
                            Fax:415.512.1325
                        EMail:emiinc@mcimail.com
                          summit@ix.netcom.com
                                    
                 ---------------------------------------
                        New Product Announcements 
                 ---------------------------------------

Digital Equipment Corporation
--------------------------------------------
At Summit '94, Digital will be demonstrating the first integrated system and network
management platform for Windows NT.  POLYCENTER AssetWORKS, in conjunction with
Microsoft's Systems Management Server, combines UNIX robustness with Windows NT
ease-of-use to provide configuration management for the vast majority of open client/server
systems. POLYCENTER Manager on NetView brings the power of industry leadership
UNIX management capabilities to Windows NT on Alpha AXP and Intel platforms.
Together, POLYCENTER AssetWORKS and POLYCENTER Manager on NetView provide
powerful functionality for both system and network management. 

Intel Will Preview LANDesk Manager V2.0
------------------------------------------------------------------------
LANDesk Manager V2.0 will fully support the DMTF DMI standard as well as feature new
task management orientation. DMI will allow information from PC sub-systems to be
gathered through a standard interface (a standard System MIF) thereby providing the basic
building blocks for asset management. 

Hewlett-Packard
------------------------
Hewlett-Packard will demo the first DMI enabled Vectra at Summit '94 which can manage
all 33 standard groups plus 6 HP extended groups with over 250 attributes. The DMI enabled
Vectras will also be used to demo Intel's LANDesk and OpenView running together. HP's
DMI MIF Browser will also be on display. 

Bridgeway Corporation Will Unveil EventIX Version 2.0 Features
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
EventIX is a network management solution that bridges the gap between legacy systems and
SNMP systems. Network managers can now support non-SNMP devices from SNMP
management systems. EventIX provides a set of tools and applications for event processing
(recognition, filtering, and correlation) and task automation. Enhancements in EventIX
version 2.0 include
* Bubble Interface - A GUI for developing, debugging, and implementing EventIX
     applications
* Support for SNMPv2. 
* Improved NetView Interface - Allows data from the SNMP manager to be sent to
     multiple IBM hosts simultaneously.
* Sybase Database Management - Intelligent agent for managing Sybase databases

Network Computing, Inc. Will Announce the LANAlert Console
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LAN Alert Console will integrate the LANAlert NetWare management system with Hewlett-
Packard OpenView/UX. LANAlert uses intelligent agents running as NLMs on NetWare file
servers to periodically interrogate up to 200 essential NetWare file server events and over
135 NetWare workstation inventory and performance events. Returned values are compared
to 3 customer-configurable thresholds with 5 associated priority levels and alerts are
generated when thresholds are crossed. 

LEGENT Corporation Will Unveil Paradigm/XP
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LEGENT will be demonstrating newly released Paradigm/XP, a comprehensive problem
management application designed to automate the help or service desk and simplify the
management of networks and distributed systems. LEGENT will also be demonstrating their
upcoming new technology which allows mainframes and UNIX machines to share problem
management information. 

DeskTalk Systems, Inc.
-------------------------------------------
DeskTalk will announce TRENDsnmp 3.0 at Summit '94. TRENDsnmp is the world's first
true client/server, scalable SNMP application for enterprise network management.
MIBwalker is the primary data collection tool for TRENDsnmp. The main MIBwalker screen
displays the actual tree structure of loaded MIB together with object description and
definition fields. TRENDbuild lets the user create meaningful graphs and table reports
without using SQL. TRENDsnmp's tabular report format displays rows and columns of
information selected from the data repository or calculated from stored values. TRENDsnmp
graph reports provide time based plots of information selected from the data repository or
calculated from stored values. 

ISICAD 
------------------------
At Summit '94, ISICAD will demonstrate its new InfoManager software, an object-oriented
database application builder which allows simultaneous update access and reporting from
multiple relational databases. InfoManager functions as a point-and-click application builder
which allows the network manager and technician to get the data they need, from wherever it
is stored, ad easily structure it into a useful format. InfoManager is a true "drag and drop"
environment that transparently handles all interaction with relational databases. It lets the
user access multiple databases simultaneously, allowing the user to obtain the information
that is required for the task at hand, without having to worry about which database it is
stored in or where it is located on the network. InfoManager will complement other database
repository strategies, such as those being suggested by Hewlett-Packard and the Management
Integration Consortium. 

Network Management Forum (NMF)
--------------------------------------------------------------
At Summit '94, the Network Management Forum will be providing details on its newest
working team -- SMART (Service Management Automation & Re-engineering Team).
SMART is comprised of users looking to cut costs, streamline operations and improve the
quality and delivery of networked information services. The objective of SMART is to
understand, prioritize, and meet all of the most pressing automation needs of these network
operators for which industry agreements are required. 


- End -

-----------[000117][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 02:20:43 GMT
From:      john@entc.tamu.edu (John T. Willis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: I have an IP address; now how do I get a domain name?

In article <398fd0$7vs@news.cs.brandeis.edu>, xray@cs.brandeis.edu (Nathan G. Raymond) says:
>
>My school has the campus networked with Apple LocalTalk connectors (which use the serial port 
>and get a throughput of about 230kbytes/second in optimum conditions
>
>xray@cs.brandeis.edu

Poor fella, don't know if the spec has reached the Mac world yet,
but Winsock & Berkley sockets both make it stupidly simple to query
the DNS directly.

Heard the other day that Mac was finally retiring Apple Talk and installing
something new in its Power Macs, don't know what they have planned for
older Macs.

-----------[000118][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 5 Nov 1994 02:56:45 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

In article <39dun0$o1r@nova.netapp.com> guy@nova.netapp.com (Guy Harris) writes:
> <d.gibson@dtt.co.nz> wrote:
 
> ...
>>a decent Transport Layer,
>
>Precisely what is "indecent" about TCP?

That's easy.  It was a lack of decent respect from its designers and
implementors for Standards Committee Experts and Authorities, and indecent
respect for implementors, experiments, and concrete experience.

According to a recent quote in "Comm.Week" from a self-described user,
the lack of decent attention by the IETF to the opinions of people like
himself will soon be fixed as the IETF becomes an Accredited Standards
Committee.  The official standards bodies starting at the top with the
ITU will soon force the IETF to respect to the Proper Authorities.
Since I've been hearing more of the contempt for "stupid implementors"
from the IETF that has been a hallmark of the meetings Accredited ANSI
Committees, I bet he is right--one way or another.

(By "implementors" I do not mean people who only purchase, install,
replace, operate, or monitor things created by others.)


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000119][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 05 Nov 1994 11:49:45 -0500
From:      Benjamin.Olken@yale.edu (Ben Olken)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains
Subject:   Public DNS

I've been told that to register my domain, I need to have my domain be
listed in at least 2 Domain Name Servers. However, while I have a computer
& an IP#, I do not access to that computers DNS. Are there public DNS out
there with whom I could register my domain?

Ben Olken
benjamin.olken@yale.edu

-----------[000120][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 16:24:29 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Question: PPP and ARP-Hack interaction.

In article <39fqv4$ftg@liberator.et.tudelft.nl> franky@dutecaj.et.tudelft.nl (Frank W. ten Wolde) writes:
>I have read about 'gratuitous ARP' used by rebooting hosts to
>invalidate all existing ARP entries for it on the network.  Perhaps
>the host "ppp2" should do 'gratuitous ARP' whenever it installs a
>new permanent published ARP entry for "myhost"?

That would probably be the best solution for this problem.

>Another solution would be that whenever "ppp1" receives a datagram 
>for "myhost", it will ICMP back to the "router1" that it is using
>an invalid hardware address for "myhost", so the router would have
>to ARP-request again for the correct hardware address of "myhost".

I don't think there's such an ICMP message defined.  There's a redirect for
IP routing, but not for proxy ARP.

Another solution would be for ppp1 to ARP for the address if it's not
dialed up to it, and then forward the packet to ppp2 when it learns that
this is the current forwarder.  This is inefficient, because all packets
from router1 to your PPP host would have to go through both ppp1 and ppp2.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000121][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 08:05:01 GMT
From:      trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.dcom.lans,de.comm.internet
Subject:   Re: Are these routes possible ?

In article <39d66h$amv@gin.pfm-mainz.de>,
Jan-Piet Mens <jpm@gin.pfm-mainz.de> wrote:
>I need your help for a few moments, please!
>
>I have been assigned two subnets (192.109.x.96) and (192.109.x.224), where
>'x' is identical in both cases. The netmask is 255.255.255.248 (fffffff8)
>My network (so far) consists of an SCO Unix 3.2 and a Sun with SUN-OS 4.1.1,
>together with sundry PCs and Printers on the network.
>
>What I would like to do, is to have these two subnets act as one, running
>on the same Ethernet cable. I have a router to the outside world with addr
>192.109.x.100 which should be accessed by all hosts in my network. The router
>runs PCROUTE onto transfer-net 193.141.y.109
>
>What I have done so far:
>
>The SCO-box is .97
>The Sun-box is .225
>
>on SCO, the following tables work fine. I have exactly what I want.
>	Routing tables
>	Destination      Gateway           Flags    Refs     Use  Interface
>	127.0.0.1        127.0.0.1         UH          7        0 lo0
>	193.141.y.109    192.109.x.100     UGH         0        0 wdn0
>	default          192.109.x.100     U           2       60 wdn0
>	192.109.x.96     192.109.x.97      U          12    13756 wdn0
>
>On SUN I have
>	Routing tables
>	Destination          Gateway            Flags    Refcnt Use        Int
>	127.0.0.1           127.0.0.1           UH       1      1395       lo0
>	default             192.109.x.97        UG       0      0          ei0
>	192.109.x.224       192.109.x.225       U        10     21499      ei0
>
>On SCO I added
>
>	# route add 192.109.x.224   192.109.x.225   1
>
>	I could then ping the Sun.
>
>On Sun I added
>
>	# route add 192.109.x.97   192.109.x.225   0	; ping .97 works
>	# route add 192.109.x.101  192.109.x.225   0	; ping .101 works
>
>	I have to add routes to each host in the .96 network to be able to
>	reach them. It works though.
>
>
>So far so good (as far as I can tell anyway :-).
>When I try to ping the outside world, the router starts transferring packets
>like mad! to the other side, and nothing ever comes back. I don't understand,
>since the Sun routes default to .97 (SCO) and it in turn routes default to
>the router, why does it not work ?
>Note, that from the .97 everything works as desired.
>
>The configuration of PCROUTE is:
>
>	******* PCroute starting *******
>	Interface 1 (ethernet)
>	    Address  192.109.x.100
>	    NetMask 255.255.255.248
>	    Flags     000FH
>	    Metric    0000H
>	    The Ethenet Address 0000H
>	    The Ethenet Address C028H
>	    The Ethenet Address D167H

Fun question (for me, at least).  I don't understand how a couple
of the things you did worked and I'm not familiar with any of
your platforms, but what the heck.

I can see 3 ways to get your 2 subnets working on a single net:

1. Simply change the netmask to 255.255.255.0.  If you do this, you
   won't be able to reach (easily) 192.109.x.16, .32, .48, .112,
   .128, .144, .160, .176, .192, .208, and .240.  Maybe no big deal
   unless they're in your own organization.

2. Have your router connect to both logical subnets.  With some 
   software you can do this with a single adapter and an alias IP
   address for it.  With other software, you would need two 
   adapters (to the same physical net).  The machines on the .96
   subnet would need a default route to the router interface on 
   that subnet.  Likewise on the .225 subnet.  All packets sent
   between subnets would have to go through the router.

3. Here's a trick I learned recently, but it may not work with
   all software:  network routes with a metric of 0 mean "local
   to this interface".  So your SCO system would be configured
   (I'm unsure of the syntax for your systems):
     ifconfig wdn0 192.109.x.97 netmask 255.255.255.248
     route add default 192.109.x.100 1
     route add net 192.109.x.224 192.109.x.97 0
   Your Sun:
     ifconfig ei0 192.109.x.225 netmask 255.255.255.248
     route add default 192.109.x.100 1
     route add net 192.109.x.96 192.109.x.225 0
   Your router:
     ifconfig en0 192.109.x.100 netmask 255.255.255.248
     route add default 193.141.y.149 1
     route add net 192.109.x.224 192.109.x.100 0

-- 
Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com



-----------[000122][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 08:15:06 -0000
From:      csr@unixdiv.UUCP
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Newsgroups: comp.protocols.tcp-ip

Hi,

	I have got SLIP for SVR4. But I don't know how to configure and
use it. I would like to know the following.  

	1. How to configure SLIP on client and server machines?

	2. How to use SLIP?

	3. Anymore information regarding SLIP?

Note:   I don't have news system on my machine. Please send replies to
	email: csr@unixdiv.nic.in

						CSRao



-----------[000123][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 08:18:30 GMT
From:      trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall)
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing question:  Getting a Sun to route

In article <39eii9$778@unix.sri.com>,
Richard Steinberger <ric@updike.sri.com> wrote:
>	A remote user connects (from his Sun) to our network of Suns via PPP.
>He has set the default route (in /etc/defaultrouter) to be the address
>of the Sun he connects to.  He is able to telnet (and rlogin and
>ping, etc) to our local Sun with no problems.  [The remote modem dials out,
>the local one answers...].  But he would like to also be able to
>connect to other machines on our net, using the the machine he
>physically comes in on as a router.  This isn't working; that is, the
>local machine isn't routing his incoming packets to other local machines.
>[And packets aren't routed out the other way back to his machine either.]

How can you tell that the local PPP machine isn't forwarding the
packets?  The usual problem with your configuration is that the
other lan machines don't know how to route to the remote system.

The following writeup describes the routing options you have.  It
was written for OS/2 systems using SLIP, but probably applies fairly
well to your Suns.  You should check the proper syntax.
 
In the examples below, IP addresses are shown using the following
shorthand:
 
  L1 = IP address for interface 1 on subnet L.  For example, if the
  subnet address is 128.1.2.0 (subnet mask = 255.255.255.0), the IP
  address would be 128.1.2.1.

Routing a LAN machine via SLIP to a home machine
------------------------------------------------
 
         SLIP link
  S1-------------------S2/I1---(the office network)
  home                 office
 
  In this setup, the administrator of the office network must provide
  you with your IP addresses.  You need at least 3 of them:  S1, S2, and
  I1.  Ideally S1 and S2 will be on a different subnet than I1 - ask for
  this configuration.  If your network administrator will only provide
  addresses in the same network, you must use the "proxy arp" solution
  below. 
 
  * The home machine
      In SETUP.CMD, add:
        route -f add default S2 1
  * The office (SLIP-LAN) machine
    * Routing to a SLIP subnet
      You simply must be running a routing protocol out the LAN (I1)
      interface.  In TCPSTART.CMD, you need to start routed (but without
      the "-q" option):
        start routed
    * Proxy arp solution - no separate SLIP subnet
      In this case, all of the IP addresses (S1, S2, I1) that you've
      been assigned are on the same subnet.  Normal routing techniques
      will not work because the S1 address (no other LAN machine needs
      to talk to S2) is not physically on the same network as I1.  So
      we try to use a technique called "proxy arp":  the office machine
      will respond on the I network to arp queries for S1 with its own
      adapter address.
 
      First you have to determine the LAN adapter address of the I1
      interface.  Issue "netstat -n" and copy the displayed "physical
      address" for the I1 interface.  In SETUP.CMD, after the "arp -f"
      statement add:
        arp -s S1 12:34:56:78:90:12 pub
      where 12:34:56:78:90:12 is the adapter address of I1.
 
      This tells TCP/IP that when it receives an arp message for IP
      address S1, that it should respond with its own adapter address.
      Thus other machines on the I subnet, when wanting to send to S1,
      will actually transmit to I1.  The S2/I1 machine should forward
      the packet over the SLIP link to S1.

-- 
Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com

-----------[000124][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 10:43:48 GMT
From:      jdwhite@iastate.edu (Jason White)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.ultrix
Subject:   Re: Problems with PPP 2.1.2 on Ultrix

In article <1994Oct31.220533.23727@jarvis.cs.toronto.edu>,
Irving Reid <irving@sys.toronto.edu> wrote:
>I'm trying to use the PPP 2.1.2 distribution between a pair of DECStation
>5000/133s running Ultrix 4.3.  I'm having two problems.
>
>First, setting the speed to 38400 makes the systems unable to talk to
>each other.  It seems like one or the other is running at the wrong baud
>rate, but I haven't been able to prove it yet.

  A number of us here at Iowa State have been playing with SLIP/PPP under
Ultrix 4.3 with various 5000 series DecStations and have found that we can't
set the serial port baud rate above 19200 bps.

-- 
   Jason D. White                        Durham Center Operations Staff
 jdwhite@iastate.edu             Repeater Chairman, Cyclone Amateur Radio Club
Iowa State University               http://www.public.iastate.edu/~jdwhite/
     Ames, Iowa                "There's a fine line between clever and stupid."

-----------[000125][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 11:40:20 GMT
From:      franky@dutecaj.et.tudelft.nl (Frank W. ten Wolde)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Question: PPP and ARP-Hack interaction.


Hello,

I would very much like to hear your opinion about the following:

We have a (university) ether-network (130.161.144.0) on which we 
have several hosts that offer dial-in PPP links to the network.
Hosts that connect using PPP have been assigned another network
(130.161.38.0).

When I call-in with my PC (let's call it "myhost") using PPP, the 
remote PPP host (let's call it "ppp1") (in the university network) 
will install a permanently published public ARP entry for my PC's 
IP address, so "myhost" will be addressable in the ethernetwork.  
The host "ppp1" will also route my IP from the 130.161.38.0 network 
to the default router (let's call it "router1") in the ether-network.

This router will, of course, at least once perform an ARP request
to find out about my PC's ethernet address.  This address will be
happily supplied by the host "ppp1", which has installed the
ARP hack for "myhost".  So far, so good, I'm on the Internet!

Next I hang up and immediately call-in with my PC on *another*
remote PPP host (let's call it "ppp2").  Now a problem occurs: 
the router "router1" still has an ARP entry for "myhost" pointing
to the ethernetcard of "ppp1".  Now my PC is effectively unreachable:
"router1" will route all IP datagrams to "myhost" through host "ppp1"
(remember "myhost" is now at "ppp2").  I need to wait for the ARP 
entry in "router1" to expire (20 minutes?).

I have read about 'gratuitous ARP' used by rebooting hosts to
invalidate all existing ARP entries for it on the network.  Perhaps
the host "ppp2" should do 'gratuitous ARP' whenever it installs a
new permanent published ARP entry for "myhost"?

Another solution would be that whenever "ppp1" receives a datagram 
for "myhost", it will ICMP back to the "router1" that it is using
an invalid hardware address for "myhost", so the router would have
to ARP-request again for the correct hardware address of "myhost".
Perhaps such a machanism is available, but either "ppp1" or
"router1" does not make use of it?  
Perhaps such a mechanism would have too many nasty side-effects and 
has therefore not been implemented in TCP/IP?

Perhaps we are using a wrong setup for connecting PPP hosts?

Any suggestions welcome!

-Frank ten Wolde
-- 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
F.W. ten Wolde (PA3FMT)                            Pinewood Automatisering B.V.
E-mail: franky@duteca.et.tudelft.nl                Kluyverweg 2a
Phone: (+31) 15 682 543                            2629 HT  Delft
Fax: (+31) 15 682 544                              The Netherlands
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000126][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 13:05:11 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: BSD TCP/IP Routing Internals

> I am trying to understand the internals of the routing code located in the
> BSD sources in the following modules:
>
> route.c
> radix.x
>
> This seems to be the most complex piece of code in the TCP/IP sources.

The forthcoming "TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 2: The Implementation" by
Gary Wright and myself (Addison-Wesley, 1995) covers this completely:
there are three chapters comprising 115 pages on the 4.4BSD radix tree
routing tables and routing sockets.  The book will be available in
early January.

Until then you might want to check out the following paper, which is
the only other documentation I'm aware of:

  %T A Tree-Based Packet Routing Table for Berkeley Unix
  %A K. Sklower
  %J Proceedings of the 1991 Winter USENIX Conference
  %C Dallas, Tex.
  %P 93-99
  %D 1991

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000127][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 5 Nov 1994 13:41:18 +0000
From:      Andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Cc:        mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de
Subject:   Re: where to find ethernet multicast addresses ?

In article <mkl.783190309@whoopi>
           mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de "Mario Klebsch DG1AM" writes:

> Hello!
> 
> I am loocking for the meaning of the ethernet addresses used for multicast.
> I configured a bridge to block a lot of ethernet multicast addresses, but
> I don't know, what the effect will be. So here is the question:
> 
>         Does anybody know, where I can find out the meaning of addresses
>         like 9:0:77:0:0:1. This address is marked as multicast by SunOS 5.3's
>         snoop.

09-00-77-00-00-00          -802-    Retix Bridge Local Management System
09-00-77-00-00-01          -802-    Retix spanning tree bridges
09-00-77-00-00-02          -802-    Retix Bridge Adaptive routing

(taken from FTP.LCS.MIT.EDU:/pub/map/EtherNet-codes)

-- 
Andrew Gabriel                        Home: Andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk
                                      Work: Andrew.Gabriel@gpt.co.uk

-----------[000128][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 5 Nov 1994 15:08:40 GMT
From:      Venkat.V <venkat.venkatsubra@sandiegoca.ncr.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: bootp over a ether/fddi switch

Ignore my last posting which said the "hardward type" sent by the bootp client 
was 4.
I got mixed up between the bootp hardware type code and the dlc hardware type
(the one in /usr/include/sys/dlpi.h -- DL_ETHER which was 4 ) . The hardware 
type
sent by the client was 1 in the bootp header.











-----------[000129][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      6 Nov 1994 01:23:49 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In article <peter.lewis-0611941252200001@rocky.curtin.edu.au> peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis) writes:
>Not really, becuase users use the LIST command, not the NLST command. 

My understanding has always been that LIST and NLST return the same names,
but LIST may also include extra information (whatever file attributes the
server wishes to include) in an unspecified format.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000130][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 5 Nov 1994 20:16:15
From:      stu@ash.lab.r1.fws.gov (Stu Mitchell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Dynamic IP Addresses?

Is there such a thing as a dynamic bootp? I have about 300 machines in a 
network and I'd like to hand out ip addresses as needed because they are all 
on one physical subnet and it doesn't have 300 addresses available. So instead 
of assigning an ip address to each machine and hard coding them in a bootptab 
file, I would like the client to come on line and have the server give it the 
next available address... 

If that doesn't work, is it possible to have more than one subnet on one 
single physical net?

BTW, the network is all token ring and the rings are bridged not routed...

Thanks!

Stu


-----------[000131][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 20:26:33 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Mail routing

Everyone / Anyone:

I have TCP/IP 2.0 for OS/2 (August CSD) and my own domain
(os2rus.com).  I would like to configure the domain/TCP/IP
to allow routing of mail without the sender knowing the host.
For example mailing to user1@os2rus.com is the same as
mailing to user1@sneakers.os2rus.com

I realize to do this I need:

  - Every userid is unique to an individual within the domain.

  - While the userid may exist on mutliple hosts, only one host
    for the user/userid will receive the mail.

  - named.host (named.dom for TCP/IP 2.0 for OS/2) needs the line
    @    IN  MX  50 ns.os2rus.com

  - The ns.os2rus.com machine needs to redirect the mail to the
    appropriate host.

It is the last step/item that has been holding me up.  I have been
reading the sendmail manuals (from IBM and the really thick one
(700 pages)) but no luck.

Are there other steps/items I need to do?
 
Thanks in advance for your help.

TB (toyboy - It is my wife's nickname for me.)
           - Visit alt.clothing.sneakers and then participate.
           - Finally, get others to participate!

-----------[000132][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 20:31:33 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SLIP - what is it, and how do I get it?

In article <1994Oct25.022153.21405@frodo.cc.flinders.edu.au>, rwinn@ist.flinders.edu.au (Rhys D. Winn) says:
: >
: >I know there are plenty of Windows based programs out there that you can use
: >to connect to your UNIX shell "if" you have the SLIP protocol. Well I have
: >a UNIX account, and a 19.2k modem, but I don't think I have the SLIP program
: >(if it is a program). I have one program that tells me to login, type the
: >command "slip" and then enter in the IP address of your site. 
: >
: >And that is another thing. How do you find out the IP address of the computer
: >you are logged into if it doesn't give it to you when you login? It would be
: >easy to just ask sysadmin if the IP address didn't change, but I think I would
: >be assigned a different address depending on which phone line I was logged in
: >through.
: >
: >
: >Regards,
: >
: >Rhys Winn          rwinn@ist.flinders.edu.au
: >

OS/2 Warp version 3.0 comes with TCP/IP using SLIP.  Yup, just like Unix - OS/2
Warp comes with TCP/IP.

-----------[000133][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 20:36:17 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SLIP and MTU

Jon Kay (jkay@rossano.ucsd.edu) wrote:
: wookie@wookie.demon.co.uk writes:
: >oberman@icaen.llnl.gov  writes:
: >>bwilson@netcom.com (Bob Wilson) writes:
: >>>       b ) Response time (Typing in Telnet connections etc)
: >>Minimal impact. If a single character is being echoed, the packet
: >>will be very small and MTU is irrelevant.
: >
: >Unless background FTSs etc knacker the interactive performance by sending
: >huge packets that delay your keystroke echo.
 
: (FTPs, I presume?)
: This actually turns out to usually be a function of TCP window size.
: It doesn't much matter how big the MTU is if TCP puts gobs of packets
: out at the same time - your poor little telnet packet is still stuck
: behind the entire TCP window's worth of data.
 
: This changes if both your machine and your WAN<->LAN gateway(s)
: support IP TOS queuing, but that's not really all that common yet
: (especially in end hosts).  It is getting more common - in another
: year or so things may have changed.
 
: 							Jon
: -- 
: WWW/Mosaic Home Page:  http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/jkay
: Email:                 jkay@cs.ucsd.edu

I run a MTU of 2048 and modified my slip.cfg when I ran into this
problem.  While its not perfect, it really helped.  I added:

 fastqueue, queuesize=24, fastqueuesize=48,

This was/is on TCP/IP 2.0 for OS/2  (2.11).

TB (toyboy - It is my wife's nickname for me.)
           - Visit alt.clothing.sneakers and then participate.
           - Finally, get others to participate!

-----------[000134][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 20:39:31 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: does telnet support binary?

Berislav Vlahovic (berislav@gpu.utcc.utoronto.ca) wrote:
: does telnet support binary information transfers?  I've been trying to telnet
: to a site where I can FTP, from a site that only allows me to mail and telnet.
: But every time I try to execute a sz or kermit send, it stops.  Is this a 
: problem with my remote or local host, or is it with the telnet protocol itself?

The rlogin protocol is 8-bit, while the telnet protocol is 7-bit.

TCP/IP 2.0 for OS/2 includes the telneto command that has a -8 option to put it
in 8-bit mode.  But ... it doesn't have zmodem support ... catch-22.

TB (toyboy - It is my wife's nickname for me.)
           - Visit alt.clothing.sneakers and then participate.
           - Finally, get others to participate!

-----------[000135][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      5 Nov 1994 20:44:35 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.ppp,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   Re: SLIP Termination

Ken Adair (Ken.Adair@Dundee.NCR.COM) wrote:
: I have an OS/2 PC running IBM's TCP/IP Version 2.0 (no CSDs). I wish to
: run a couple of independent third party applications which will require 
: the use of a SLIP connection. Each of the applications connect to the
: same address and may or may not to run simultaneously. 
 
: The problem is, I want to close the modem link when the last program has
: completed. How can I detect when the SLIP line is in use and when the last 
: program has finished with the SLIP connection?
 
: Regards
 
: Ken Adair

Ken:

Several ways are possible under OS/2.

  Have you tried netstat -s?  This should tell you what sockets are in use
  and if you don't see your programs then ...
 
  Another way is to monitor (using say REXX/2) if the programs are running
  under OS/2.  If so the line is up, if not take the line down.

If you need programming examples, just drop me a line.  The examples will
assume you have REXXLIB by Quertus or something like it (e.g. by GammaTech,
shareware, etc.)

TB (toyboy - It is my wife's nickname for me.)
           - Visit alt.clothing.sneakers and then participate.
           - Finally, get others to participate!

-----------[000136][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      6 Nov 1994 11:37:11 -0800
From:      wittm@ee.pdx.edu (Michael Witt)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Driver for ST-NIC / PCMCIA Ethernet


I'm working on a driver for the National DP83902A (ST-NIC) Ethernet
controller.  It happens to be housed in a PCMCIA card (which I'm
connecting to a 68000 based system, not a PC).

I would be interested in comparing notes with someone who is also
working on (or has done) a driver for the ST-NIC.

-Mike (wittm@ee.pdx.edu)


-----------[000137][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      6 Nov 94 00:36:07
From:      billw@glare.cisco.com (William )
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.ultrix
Subject:   Re: Problems with PPP 2.1.2 on Ultrix

   A number of us here at Iowa State have been playing with SLIP/PPP under
   Ultrix 4.3 with various 5000 series DecStations and have found that we can't
   set the serial port baud rate above 19200 bps.


The generally poor implementation of Async serial interfaces and drivers in
many "large" computer systems is one of the factors that has driven the
growth of the "terminal server" market.  You don't WANT a bunch of users
running faster than 19200bps on a system with a per-character interrupt
async board, which many are.  Even the much touted 16550 class uarts with 16
byte fifos require a lot more byte handling than one would like to do on a
"compute server"...  Ideally, a terminal server batches that all into
reasonably sized packets for the host to handle (and then many hosts handle
the packet in as inefficient a manner as possible, but that's just "the unix
way".)  In the case of SLIP, which many terminal servers now support
directly, you don't necessarilly need any host at all.

BillW
cisco

-----------[000138][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 6 Nov 94 10:59:39 -0500
From:      Peter Chapman <bankrupt@delphi.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SLIP help wanted

Your SLIP questions are also some of my key questions.  I have a little
386 that I want to connect with a SLIP connection to my local provider.  I
want my 386 to run as a client/user AND as a small server/provider.  I am
lost, however, as to exactly what pieces of software I need.
 
If you have any insights, I'd really appreciate the help.  THanks!

-----------[000139][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      6 Nov 1994 04:25:59 GMT
From:      glenn@popco.com (Glenn Fleishman)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains
Subject:   Re: Public DNS

In article
<Benjamin.Olken-0511941149450001@branford-college-node.net.yale.edu>
Benjamin.Olken@yale.edu (Ben Olken) writes:

> Are there public DNS out
> there with whom I could register my domain?

I haven't heard of any. We've decided to offer DNS primary and
secondary service at an arbitrary rate: $250/year for DNS primary (i.e.
register your domain in your name, maintain records on our site, single
mail account for forwarding, maintain primary and secondary on our
site, and an offsite secondary as well) and $100/year for backup
secondary (on two machines at our site and an offsite machine as well).

This is probably priced too high, but we've asked to supply the service
to a few companies, and we want to price it high enough to make it
worthwhile to deal with the administrative work involved and the pain
and suffering if we have to migrate machines, take systems down, etc.,
and maintain domain resolution at a high level throughout.

I believe you can get accounts at some service providers who will
register your domain and maintain records for a $50 startup fee, but
otherwise it's just regular monthly access fees ($10-$20). So we're in
the ballpark with our fee for that.

Frankly, if you have two UNIX machines running DNS connected to the
Internet, it's really a matter of
* Filling the form out and sending it to InterNIC (<2 minutes if you've
done it at least once before)
* Making a DNS record (we have a model, so that takes 15 seconds)
* Adding a line to named.boot on the primary and secondary (about 30
seconds each)
* Restarting the nameserver (2 second)

It's about 5 minutes work overall to add a domain correctly. However,
it's the overhead you're paying for: we have T1 throughput, monthly
fees to pay, etc., and any activity we perform on our site requires
that we include our overhead in charging for it.

I hope this isn't a long-winded explanation. But there have been a
number of queries about why it's so difficult or so expensive to do
this, and this is really why: we're all paying for our access and our
machines, so we have to get a return on what we do.
----
Glenn Fleishman, Point of Presence Company <info@popco.com>
        Trend Watch columnist, Aldus Magazine
        Moderator, Internet Marketing discussion list; send the message
        INFO INET-MARKETING to the address LISTPROC@EINET.NET for info

-----------[000140][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      6 Nov 1994 04:45:56 GMT
From:      eafu060@taurus.oac.uci.edu (Keiji Uesugi)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Mac:How to use slip?

Hi,
I was wondering if anyone could tell me how to use the MacTcp to connect 
to the internet.  I have no clue as how to do so, so any help will be 
appreciated.  Such as how to use slip and what software I should be using 
to connect to the internet in order to use slip.

Thanks

eafu060@ea.oac.uci.edu


-----------[000141][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      6 Nov 1994 04:51:15 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SLIP - what is it, and how do I get it?

: In article <1994Oct25.022153.21405@frodo.cc.flinders.edu.au>, rwinn@ist.flinders.edu.au (Rhys D. Winn) says:
: >
: >And that is another thing. How do you find out the IP address of the computer
: >you are logged into if it doesn't give it to you when you login? It would be
: >easy to just ask sysadmin if the IP address didn't change, but I think I would
: >be assigned a different address depending on which phone line I was logged in
: >through.
: >
: >
: >Regards,
: >
: >Rhys Winn          rwinn@ist.flinders.edu.au
: >

The command you need is host.  It is normally a general user
command, though, this would depend upon the system.

TB (toyboy - It is my wife's nickname for me.)
           - Visit alt.clothing.sneakers and then participate.
           - Finally, get others to participate!

-----------[000142][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 06 Nov 1994 22:16:03 -0500
From:      cps@access.digex.net (Chris Smolinski)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   RFC for IRC?

Can someone tell me which RFC describes the protocols used to implement IRC?

Thanks,

Chris

-----------[000143][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      6 Nov 1994 14:41:32 GMT
From:      roy@mchip00.med.nyu.edu (Roy Smith)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   traceroute vs. MacTCP/ARA

	My Mac at home is connected to my campus lan using MacTCP 2.0.4 over
an ARA connection to a Novell NetConnect box  Everything seems to be working
fine, but when I try and do a traceroute from the Ultrix box I'm logged into
back to my Mac, I get:

traceroute to 128.122.244.106 (128.122.244.106), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets
 1  medgwa (128.122.205.1)  4 ms  4 ms  4 ms
 2  * * *
 3  * * *
[more of the same deleted to save space]
28  * * *
29  * * *
30  *

128.122.244.106 is my Mac, medgwa is a cisco AGS+.  I'm not sure of the
exact topology, but the NetConnect is either on a network directly connected
to medgwa, or there might be one other AGS+ between them.

What's happening here?  Is something just eating the ICMP messages?  Or are
*neither* the NetConnect box nor MacTCP generating them?  It not clear in my
mind whether the NetConnect box should even be generating ICMPs, since it's
not really routing IP, it's encapsulating IP inside AT, then routing the AT
packets.  But, even then, I should be getting them from the Mac, unless
MacTCP is just broken and doesn't generate the ICMP PORT_UNREACHABLE
messages it's supposed to.
-- 
Roy Smith <roy@nyu.edu>
Hippocrates Project, Department of Microbiology, Coles 202
NYU School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016
"This never happened to Bart Simpson."

-----------[000144][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 6 Nov 1994 15:22:46 GMT
From:      adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: [HELP] Would you help me?

In article <3984kp$s34@news.kreonet.re.kr>,
                nasol <nasol2@mgt.kaist.ac.kr> wrote:

>I am looking for a package program named Phil Karn's KA9Q. If somebody tell me
>where I can get it, it will be greatly appreciated.
>
>Also, I want any informations or comments, and if possible, other source programs
>for TCP/IP router(with respect to RIP, OSPF, SNMP(especially, MIB#2) etc.), which
>can be implemented and runned under "DOS" environment.
>

There is a version of it on ftp.demon.co.uk - cant remember which
directory - likely /pub/msdos.

-- 
Adam

=======================================================================
| Computech  Tel/Fax: 0181 673 7817  email: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk |
=======================================================================

-----------[000145][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 6 Nov 1994 16:32:10 GMT
From:      Leo.Smith@elmail.co.uk
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing question: Getting a Sun to route


In article <39gufj$8m4@case.cyberspace.com>, <valko@cyberspace.com> writes:

> Richard Steinberger (ric@updike.sri.com) wrote:
> : 	A remote user connects (from his Sun) to our network of Suns via PPP.
> : He has set the default route (in /etc/defaultrouter) to be the address
> : of the Sun he connects to.  He is able to telnet (and rlogin and
> : ping, etc) to our local Sun with no problems.  [The remote modem dials out,
> : the local one answers...].  But he would like to also be able to
> : connect to other machines on our net, using the the machine he
> : physically comes in on as a router.  This isn't working; that is, the
> : local machine isn't routing his incoming packets to other local machines.
> : [And packets aren't routed out the other way back to his machine either.]
 
> : 	Can anyone help with a few details: First, is it possible for a Sun
> : (4.1.3) to do this routing for in incoming/outgoing PPP connection?  
 Second,
> : what is the form of the relevant route (or related) command?  An RTFM 
 (which
> : M?) would be OK too.  Thanks in advance to all who reply.....
> 
> You may want to look at in.routed to pass your routing information around 
> your subnet.  Check the man page, and you may want to pay attention to how 
> long routed waits before passing a route around your subnet.
> 
It is a matter of great simplicity to set this up.

IF the dial in machine is on the SAME IP network as the rest of your machines 
then there should be no problem - as soon as he is on line he will appear as 
another interface on the local network to the SUN he dials in on.

If it is on a different net you need to set up static routes on the machines 
that it needs to connect to.

E.g.

If the remote machine is 192.0.0.1 and the sun it dials into is 193.0.0.1 and 
another machine or yoiur net is 193.0.0.2

The remote machine needs a default route added...

route add default 193.0.0.1 1

and the other machines on the network need some routes adding..

route add 192.0.0.1 193.0.0.1 1

This will tell both ends of the link to use the sparc in the middle as a 
gateway.

You should check all these tables with a netstat -r on the machines.

I hope that helps. If you want some excellent examples and have a PostScript 
printer, I strongly suggest downloading the Morningstar manuals from 
ftp.morningstar.com - and the code is even better than the manuals by the way 
(not free tho) There are step by step isntruction son setting up exactly this 
kind of setup.




-----------[000146][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 6 Nov 94 18:51:57 GMT
From:      rr002c@uhura.cc.rochester.edu (Rajib Rashid)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   PLEASE help abpit problem with MSTCP & Mosaic [second post]

Hello:

	I had posted this message a week ago, but I have not received any
responces... PLEASE, if someone can give me any information, or help, it
would be greatly appreciated.

>        I recently switched from Trumpet Winsock to Microsoft's 32bit TCP/IP
>stacks (wolverine) for my 486 computer with 8MB ram, running windows for
>Workgroup 3.11. Everything seems to work wonderfully, except when someone
>tries to access large files via Mosaic/WinWeb from my machine (running NCSA
>HTTPD 1.3), they get an error "connection has been reset" ... I have found
>no apparent reason for this behavior. I never found this problem when I was
>using Trumpet Winsock, and the same files were easily accessible. Is there
>some special spep that need to take, or some trick that I can use to fix
>this problem? I really need to get this problem fixed since some of the
>files on my Web server are not at all accessible :(

	It acts really weirdly... sometime I can see a 30k file properly
(gets transferred) but a 12k file would not get through... they are both
inline gif images. And it happens under all circumstances, from different
machines :( Oh, I am connected to the university backbone by means of
ethernet connections.

	Please send your replies to 'rr002c@uhura.cc.rochester.edu'. Thank
you very much in advance.

	Rajib Rashid
	University of Rochester



-----------[000147][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 6 Nov 94 18:54:58 GMT
From:      rr002c@uhura.cc.rochester.edu (Rajib Rashid)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   MSTCP/IP + nos/wnos .. possible??

Hello:

	Can anyone tell me how I can setup KA9Q nos/wnos based telnet server
with Microsoft's TCp/IP (wolverine)? Since Wolverine is VxD based, I am not
loading any packet driver (although I guess I have to if I want to use nos).
Can anyone please give me the steps necessary and example autoexec.nos and
config files?

	Please send your replies to 'rr002c@uhura.cc.rochester.edu'. Thank
you very much in advance.

	Rajib Rashid
	University of Rochester





-----------[000148][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      6 Nov 1994 20:34:41 GMT
From:      iemalh@unix1.sncc.lsu.edu (Sudhir Malhotra)
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   Gurus! Please help.


I am posting the following on behalf of a friend
who doesn't have access to Usenet. He would greatly
appreciate any reponses. Please reply to

Rahul Bedi, e-mail rahulb@hclhprnd.uunet.in

Thanks.

>> Query begins
Are  there any public domain implementations of netbios, netbeui
(or netbios frames protocol ) working on LLC ? Also are there
any for IEEE 802.2 (Logical Link Standard ) ? Is there any
difference in NETBIOS and NETBEUI interfaces ?

Does the Windows for workgroups 3.11 NETBEUI driver contain the
implementation of LLC in it or uses some other driver for it ? I mea
n
that do the packets given down to the NDIS driver by NETBEUI driver
in WFWG3.11 contain the LLC header ?
>> Query ends


-----------[000149][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 00:46:32 GMT
From:      adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Raw Sockets & Interface Selection?

In article <398enl$pj0@nuclear.microserve.net>,
                Vinnie <vinnie@pocono.microserve.com> wrote:

>
>Is there a way to specify a particular network interface to send
>outgoing packets to? 
>

Erm, not really apart from specifying an IP address that is known to
match a route destination. Specifying the IP address of the if *may*
work, but I tend have all if IP addresses when used as a destination
routed through a loopback if as a convenience - but this s/w is only
*derived* from sockets and it aint a Unix box so some things are done
slightly differently, for eg - I had to implement the loopback if myself
as an extra bolt-on :-(

>What I need to be able to do is specify which interface, (on a UNIX
>host which has multiple interfaces), a packet will be sent out on.
>I am using raw sockets. I don't want to exec() a 'route add...' if
>there is a better way.
>

I don't know if the standard BSD sockets API normally allows this, but
the BSD (4.3) *derived* protocol stack that I use does allow if
structures to be accessed through the socketioctl() calls.

We have to use this hack to ensure that a broadcast goes out through all
interfaces (An inherited NetBSD 4.3 problem I believe???) by doing a
sendto() the broadcast address for each interface rather than a sendto()
to INADDR_BROADCAST which I think allow sends through the first
ifconfig'd if or something. (At least this is what the blurb says)

Whether any of this is useful to you is unknown... Good luck ;-)

-- 
Adam

=======================================================================
| Computech  Tel/Fax: 0181 673 7817  email: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk |
=======================================================================

-----------[000150][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 01:21:42 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SLIP help wanted

Peter Chapman (bankrupt@delphi.com) wrote:
: Your SLIP questions are also some of my key questions.  I have a little
: 386 that I want to connect with a SLIP connection to my local provider.  I
: want my 386 to run as a client/user AND as a small server/provider.  I am
: lost, however, as to exactly what pieces of software I need.
:  
: If you have any insights, I'd really appreciate the help.  THanks!

I strongly suggest OS/2 Warp verion 3.0 (about $80 for the CD-ROM version).
It comes with a full TCP/IP implementation (including gopher client, WWW
explorer (via ftp site), MIME mailer, etc.) that supports SLIP.  You can
use your own provider or IBM (I think it is $25 or 40 hours).

TB (toyboy - It is my wife's nickname for me.)
           - Visit alt.clothing.sneakers and then participate.
           - Finally, get others to participate!

-----------[000151][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 06 Nov 1994 12:52:20 +0800
From:      peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In article <1994Nov5.001351.13059@novell.com>, donp@novell.com (don
provan) wrote:

>First of all, discussing "original intention" in the same paragraph as
>NDIR is somewhat misleading, since NDIR was only proposed several
>years after the FTP spec was written. I'm not aware that NDIR has
>actually been specified to this day, but I don't track FTP
>developments as closely as I used to. The FTP server implementations I
>checked don't even list NDIR as "unsupported".

The "original intention" I was refereing to was for the NLST command, not
NDIR.  You're right that NDIR is not specified in any RFC.  This was
documented somewhere, but not formally as far as I know.  My Mac FTP
server supports the NDIR command as an equivalent to NLST that only lists
directories.

>Secondly, saying that NLST was only supposed list "file names" is not
>as conclusive as one might think. In nearly every file system I've
>ever encountered, directories *are* files, so it's be perfectly
>natural to list their names along with the data files' names.

The point is, the output of the NLST command was suppose to be an
acceptible parameter to the GET command (at least that is my
understanding).  Also, I dont think MSDOS or Mac directories are files. 
I'm not sure about VMS.

>When you consider that navigation around a remote file system would be
>virtually impossible via FTP if NLST didn't include subdirectories, I
>find it very hard to believe that the original authors would have
>been thinking that subdirectories shouldn't be including.

Not really, becuase users use the LIST command, not the NLST command. 
Anyway, since I cant find the document that even described the NDIR
command, there isn't much in the way of real facts to debate :-)
   Peter.
-- 
Peter N Lewis <peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au> - Macintosh TCP fingerpainter
FTP my programs from redback.cs.uwa.edu.au:Others/PeterLewis/ or
amug.org:pub/peterlewis/ or nic.switch.ch:software/mac/peterlewis/

-----------[000152][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 02:24:21 GMT
From:      chester@mackeysparc.hinet.net (Chester H. Lin)
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing question:  Getting a Sun to route

Richard Steinberger (ric@updike.sri.com) wrote:
> 	A remote user connects (from his Sun) to our network of Suns via PPP.
> He has set the default route (in /etc/defaultrouter) to be the address
> of the Sun he connects to.  He is able to telnet (and rlogin and
> ping, etc) to our local Sun with no problems.  [The remote modem dials out,
> the local one answers...].  But he would like to also be able to
> connect to other machines on our net, using the the machine he
> physically comes in on as a router.  This isn't working; that is, the
> local machine isn't routing his incoming packets to other local machines.
> [And packets aren't routed out the other way back to his machine either.]
 
> 	Can anyone help with a few details: First, is it possible for a Sun
> (4.1.3) to do this routing for in incoming/outgoing PPP connection?  Second,
> what is the form of the relevant route (or related) command?  An RTFM (which
> M?) would be OK too.  Thanks in advance to all who reply.....

Add the following start-up command into every Sun on your subnet:

route -n add /remote-Sun-PPP-IP-address/ /PPP-server-PPP-address/ 1

Then, add the following to remote Sun's routing table entry:

route add default /PPP-server-PPP-address/ 1

--
------------------------------------------------------------------
Chester H. Lin                       chester@mackeysparc.hinet.net

Mackey Mouse BBS               FirstClass Server in Taipei, Taiwan
886-2-3627273 (14,400bps)
886-2-3929997 (14,400bps)

-----------[000153][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 12:52:58 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: traceroute vs. MacTCP/ARA

In article <39ipus$ki6@cmcl2.NYU.EDU> roy@mchip00.med.nyu.edu (Roy Smith) writes:
>	My Mac at home is connected to my campus lan using MacTCP 2.0.4 over
>an ARA connection to a Novell NetConnect box  Everything seems to be working
>fine, but when I try and do a traceroute from the Ultrix box I'm logged into
>back to my Mac, I get:

[Traceroute omitted

>What's happening here?  Is something just eating the ICMP messages?

Looks like something is eating the ICMP messages.  I just tried traceroute
to one of our Macs here and it worked.  MacTCP does have the bug that the
TTL of the ICMP error is copied from the incoming packet, so you should
expect a bunch of "* * *" lines before the response from the Mac shows up
(if there are N gateways, there should be N-1 failing hops after the last
gateway).
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000154][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 05:13:35 GMT
From:      peisch@cfa.org (Peter Eisch)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   MTU Question for the Experts...

Our frame-relay carrier has suggested lowering the mtu on our router's WAN
ports to better match the mtu of the trunking hardware.  This means
dropping the mtu from the uncontested 1500 to 512 bytes.  The only
protocol on the net is IP.

I've dropped the mtu's on a couple routers to experiment with and did some
minimal testing.  Ping times seemed a tad bit quicker, but I'm wondering
if anyone there are any indicators that might show that this is an
appropriate or inappropriate action.

I feel bad, as an IP hack, that all my IO has to be fragmented before
hitting the cloud.  Just because the router seems to fragment a little
quicker than our frame-relay carrier's switch doesn't make much sense to
load the task on the router.  Are there some other things I should be
looking at?

peter

--
peisch@cfa.org
Network Admin



-----------[000155][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 14:19:56 -0500
From:      root@inet.guthrie.org
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   pop3d can't access /usr/spool/mail/username

I am trying to configure an RS6000 running AIX 3.2 as a pop3 server.
I can telnet to port 110, and log in. Immediately after logging in,
if there is mail for a user, pop3d responds with the following:

" -ERR cannot open mailbox /usr/spool/mail/username"

sendmail is running and mail and pine(a mail reader) can access the mailbox.
Why can't the pop3d open the mailbox?

If there is no mail, pop3d responds with:

"+OK 0 messages ready for username in /usr/spool/mail/username"


If there is a more appropriate group to post this to, please let me know.
Also, if anyone has any ideas on cross-posting questions about pop3 elsewhere,
likewise, let me know.


Thanks for the help,

Paul Taylor

-----------[000156][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 16:05:56 -0600
From:      fwp@Jester.CC.MsState.Edu (Frank Peters)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   VSAT network link experiences sought

Hello,

I'm interested in hearing from anyone familiar with VSAT network links.

We are involved in a state wide networking project.  One component of
this project is several hundred T1 or 56KB network links to various
high schools in the state.  Unfortunately, as is typical in our state
(and, probably, most states) we have been told that we need to have an
executive summary and rough cost estimates available by next monday.

One group has proposed the use of VSAT satellite links instead of
traditional land phone service.   We are concerned about the effects of
transmission delay in such a link.  It has been suggested that various
buffering/acknowledgement tricks can conceal these delays but none of
us has direct experience with such links.

So, on to my questions.

Does anyone out there know of any large scale situations in which VSAT
technology is being used instead of traditional land service where land
service is available?

These links would be general purpose network links (telnet, ftp,
gopher, www, nntp, etc and perhaps some Novell IPX traffic).  Can
anyone with any experience with VSAT links suggest what sorts of
performance characteristics we could expect from such a link for
general purpose IP/IPX traffic?  Are there particular protocols which
are particularly vulnerable to transmission delay problems?

Are there other factors besides transmission delay that we should be
concerned about when considering use of VSAT?

Thanks in advance for any comments.
-- 
Frank Peters  -  UNIX Systems Group Leader  -  Mississippi State University
Internet: fwp@CC.MsState.Edu  -  Phone: 601-325-7030  -  FAX: 601-325-8921
             WWW Home Page:  http://www.msstate.edu/~fwp/

-----------[000157][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 06:08:29 GMT
From:      uiproj@cs.hku.hk (Unified Interface)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   What is wattcp ?

Hi,

Can anyone tell me what wattcp is? Is it used together with winsock ?

Thanks for any help.


Ginny


-----------[000158][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 10:31:10 GMT
From:      adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP! Problem when client closes

In article <1994Nov1.153531.4478@lmpsbbs.comm.mot.com>,
                Ken Lierman <lierman@ssd.comm.mot.com> wrote:

>Leo,
>
>Well, my problem was that I was not checking the return value of recv for 
>a zero length.  When I did this and had the server close the socket when a zero
>length message was received, that fixed it.  I suppose it could happen in reverse
>if the server went away and the client was still trying to receive messages..
>

Isnt a signal generated when the other end closes? - SIGPIPE or
something...?

I take it nothing else can give rise to zero length reads?

Also has anyone got a reliable way of doing a non-blocking connect and
detecting when the Established state is reached using one of the sockets
calls, or are non-blocking connects a no-no in BSD?

Reason for this is that I have a BSD derived protocol stack that is not
running in a pre-emptive enviroment - ie not running as part of Unix.

Blocking operations really do block everything so need to be avoided at
all times.

-- 
Adam

=======================================================================
| Computech  Tel/Fax: 0181 673 7817  email: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk |
=======================================================================

-----------[000159][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 12:53:09 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: does telnet support binary?

In article <39gqi3$okq@tequesta.gate.net>, toyboy@gate.net (toyboy) writes:
|> Berislav Vlahovic (berislav@gpu.utcc.utoronto.ca) wrote:
|> : does telnet support binary information transfers?  I've been trying to telnet
|> : to a site where I can FTP, from a site that only allows me to mail and telnet.
|> : But every time I try to execute a sz or kermit send, it stops.  Is this a 
|> : problem with my remote or local host, or is it with the telnet protocol itself?
|> 
|> The rlogin protocol is 8-bit, while the telnet protocol is 7-bit.

Not so.

Rlogin does pass 8 bit data, but it's not 8 bit clean.  There are
certain "magic" sequences which will be eaten by the rlogin daemon, such
as FF FF 73 73 (the window-size-change sequence).

Telnet is at the protocol layer 8-bit-clean.  There are some
implementations, of course, which don't support that.  (I transfer
binary data over telnet connections through our terminal servers all the
time using both zmodem and Kermit.)

The original poster should look into turning off escape characters that
might be getting in the way (software flow control, telnet attention and
command-line-interface attention sequences).

--
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000160][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 14:19:16 GMT
From:      hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu (Paul Hethmon)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In message <1994Nov5.001351.13059@novell.com> - donp@novell.com (don provan) wr
ites:
>In article <peter.lewis-0211941016140001@rocky.curtin.edu.au> peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis) writes:
>>The original intention was to only list file names.  directory names are
>>listed with the NDIR command.
>
>First of all, discussing "original intention" in the same paragraph as
>NDIR is somewhat misleading, since NDIR was only proposed several
>years after the FTP spec was written. I'm not aware that NDIR has
>actually been specified to this day, but I don't track FTP
>developments as closely as I used to. The FTP server implementations I
>checked don't even list NDIR as "unsupported".
>
>Secondly, saying that NLST was only supposed list "file names" is not
>as conclusive as one might think. In nearly every file system I've
>ever encountered, directories *are* files, so it's be perfectly
>natural to list their names along with the data files' names.
>
>When you consider that navigation around a remote file system would be
>virtually impossible via FTP if NLST didn't include subdirectories, I
>find it very hard to believe that the original authors would have
>been thinking that subdirectories shouldn't be including.

The problem is that there is no distinction between directories and
files with the NLST command. For a person or gui client program to
understand which is which, they need to see the output of the LIST
command and parse it. This means that if you write a gui ftp client, you
have to put code in to parse the output of LIST for every ftp server
you might encounter.

Maybe it's time to update the standard with something like a 
DLST for directories and FLST for files only. The other thing that
would be useful would be a file listing that contained names and
sizes only. Perhaps a FLST command could return a list of files with
sizes.

Paul Hethmon
Programmer/Analyst & IBM Certified OS/2 Engineer
Agricultural Policy Analysis Center
The University of Tennessee at Knoxville
hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu  ==  615-974-3666



-----------[000161][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 22:13:29 -0400
From:      rballard@fox.nstn.ca (Rick Ballard)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: MTU Question for the Experts...

In article <CyvtCG.9vG@cfa.org> peisch@cfa.org (Peter Eisch) writes:

>Our frame-relay carrier has suggested lowering the mtu on our router's WAN
>ports to better match the mtu of the trunking hardware.  This means
>dropping the mtu from the uncontested 1500 to 512 bytes.  The only
>protocol on the net is IP.
 
>I've dropped the mtu's on a couple routers to experiment with and did some
>minimal testing.  Ping times seemed a tad bit quicker, but I'm wondering
>if anyone there are any indicators that might show that this is an
>appropriate or inappropriate action.
 
>I feel bad, as an IP hack, that all my IO has to be fragmented before
>hitting the cloud.  Just because the router seems to fragment a little
>quicker than our frame-relay carrier's switch doesn't make much sense to
>load the task on the router.  Are there some other things I should be
>looking at?

Read RFC0879.txt (on choosing best mtu and mss) and RFC1144.PS (on VJ 
compressed slip) from ds.internic.net, directory /rfc - for some indepth 
discussion on this subject. According to the rfcs, the -minimum- packet buffer 
a host (or I should imagine a router) is -required- to have on the internet is 
576 bytes. There are some newer rfcs on frame relay. The main problem with 
mtu=1500 is that a remote host with a smaller mtu may not even accept a packet 
of that size, it will not be able to reassemble the fragments if it is 
fragmented, and will not be able to buffer it anyway if it is not. Of course 
these rfcs assume you are sending packets over the internet.
--
__________________________________________________     _______________
|                      |                         |    /  _____________O
| Rick Ballard         | rballard@fox.nstn   .ca |   /  /|___________
| Halifax, Nova Scotia |                         |  /  /_/___________O
| Canada               |                         | /________________
|______________________|_________________________| |________________O

-----------[000162][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 15:45:33 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: MTU Question for the Experts...

In article <CyvtCG.9vG@cfa.org> peter@tahiti.umhc.umn.edu writes:
>Our frame-relay carrier has suggested lowering the mtu on our router's WAN
>ports to better match the mtu of the trunking hardware.  This means
>dropping the mtu from the uncontested 1500 to 512 bytes.  The only
>protocol on the net is IP.
>
>I've dropped the mtu's on a couple routers to experiment with and did some
>minimal testing.  Ping times seemed a tad bit quicker, but I'm wondering
>if anyone there are any indicators that might show that this is an
>appropriate or inappropriate action.
>
>I feel bad, as an IP hack, that all my IO has to be fragmented before
>hitting the cloud.  Just because the router seems to fragment a little
>quicker than our frame-relay carrier's switch doesn't make much sense to
>load the task on the router.  Are there some other things I should be
>looking at?


Why not try one of the standard TCP/IP benchmarks, such as ttcp, netperf
or nettest?  (Look for source on ftp.sgi.com).  You are buying the
service to move data, so why not use one of the standard benchmarks?
The benchmarks work better a Kbit/sec than they do at Gbit/sec.  At less
than Mbit/sec rates, the numbers reported by ftp are relevant.

Some carriers do not seem to like their customers actually measuring
things, but that's just tough.  You may have to use a very large 2x4 to
get them to pay attention to the objective results of the benchmarks.
If you do not get the bit rates you're paying for, be prepared to rent
some network monitors to prove where the packets are being delayed or
lost.  They'll likely claim your hosts are at fault.


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000163][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 15:56:57 GMT
From:      johnam@bart.datastorm.com (johnam)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   NNTP, which RFC(s) specifies it?

Which RFC(s) define the NNTP specification?  Are there any good documents
out there on this subject?

thanks
jam

-----------[000164][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 16:32:31 GMT
From:      d.gibson@dtt.co.nz
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP!!!!

In article <39dt74$a0h@nntp.Stanford.EDU> Dave Crocker <dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu> writes:
>The PTTs have an environment which is largely subject to end-to-end
>monolithic control; they also have a funding model that makes big,
>expensive solutions feasible.  This does not match true open systems
>networkin realities.  Hence, we need to be careful in using the PTTs
>as an example.
I would claim PTT's are a good example!  Collectively they provide a
federated system - like the Internet.  (Admittedly the granularity of
federation on the Internet is finer).

Take New Zealand, for example.  We have a population of about 3.5M.
The country is about the size of the UK or California.  We have 3
telephone companies competing on a national basis!  Telecommunications
has been deregulated for over 7 years.  I can setup as a telecommunications
network provider and begin to dig up the streets.  However, these
small scale ventures have not got anywhere - telecommunications 
transmission remains a utility function. 

I doubt if either company would accept that their internal systems are
excessively big or expensive.  (If they were the American shareholders
would be very annoyed).  It all comes down to "Class of Service" - a
utility needs to invest in management systems to maintain availability
levels and offer services.

>The specification process has not been object/method
>oriented.  The CMIP MIB was developed long after its operations. 
>Operations
>involve considerable complexity and emulate pseudo-data base work.

What interests me is the application of the standards rather than
their origins.

Based on other postings in this feed I can only describe myself as an
"ethusiastic amateur" in the field of OSI management.  My reading of
the standards (heaps of X.7xx, M.3xxx) leads me to the conclusion that
the application of OSI management relies on an object oriented approach.

Most of the work is in the modelling of managed objects.  (As far as I
can see).  Application of the GDMO is, in essence, a methodology for
object oriented design.

<Points raised>
>The (CMIP) protocol requires a connection.
>Implementation overhead for CMIP is quite high
>SNMP has events, it's just that the culture tries to avoid using them.
> Using events requires much cleverness on the part of the managed
> host.  There was an explicit decision in the SNMP community to limit
> the load on the managed entity, at the expense of the managing entity.

Responding to the last point ... the limitation in modelling richness is
often a problem with SNMP - sometimes you need advanced techniques for
complex problems.

CMISE is a genuine distributed approach to Management.  It is difficult 
to manage a set of common objects with different management domains
(accounting, operations, control, security etc) using SNMP.  There are
practical problems with the protocol suite that the OSI approach solves!
The secret - to me - is the ability to create complex models of complex
objects - to inherit rather than invent and to do all this in an abstract
syntax rather than "crunch" 'C' structures. 

>> .. it has grown so fast that the problems and limitations of its
>>original design _REQUIRE_ a major change in peoples thinking.
>
>sounds reasonable, but what does this actually mean, concretely?

I'm glad you asked this question ... ;-}

Connections are back in fashion:  the next generation of high speed
WAN is connection oriented at data link layer!  Why have a CL (connection
less) network layer over a CO link layer supporting a CO transport!
If the question is: "which is better, CO or CL"?  The Answer is Yes!

Use Layered Services:  inconsitancy in between TCP/IP applications is
created because every application has to handle "session" and
"presentation" contexts within the application.  Why not produce a set
of layers on top of TCP to handle a broader set of network functions
in a coherent way?

Abstraction:  we must move out of the "assembler" age of network 
application design.  The reason creating distributed applications
is so difficult is because each idea is expressed in a concrete 
way - we must move forward.  Creation of ASN.1 is a watershed event
along the path to abstracting network services.

One thing I have not seen on the Internet is a technology "vision" 
about a framework and structure for development of todays services.
Developing "the best" network layer protocols is one thing -
it should be judged in a broader context of what the community wants
to achieve.  I would expect that the "vision" would build guidelines
and frameworks for "infrastructure" development.  Advanced layering
and promoting abstract services would be my top "picks".  For example,
beyond addressing there are no real differences between the technology
of CLNP and IPng ... the people who should really care are the people 
who "cut silicon" - network/transport layer should be a hardware rather
than software implementation issue.

I see integration with the PTT's as inevitable.  The Internet has 
proven that a market exists for network services ..  PTT growth is
stalled in voice services .. the "big boys" are hungry for revenue
growth to justify the massive capital they have invested.  They will
be knocking on the door.  There are some issues .. do you compete?
do you integrate? do you assimilate?  First of all you need to 
understand the threats and opportunities ... very difficult when there
is no clear constituancy or body of interest.  Imagine what the world
would be like if Microsoft "owned" the Internet ... (now there is a 
scary though) ... 

 

-----------[000165][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 16:47:34 +0000
From:      pmitchell@assistg.demon.co.uk (Paul Mitchell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   IP addressing strategies

We're currently designing a new network which will host about 6,000 
users.  Part of the design of course is the IP addressing scheme.  We 
don't anticipate that this network will ever be connected to the 
Internet, but life being life, maybe it will!

How should we arrange our addresses?  Should we apply for a segment of 
Internet address space now even if we'll probably never use it?  Should 
we ignore the Internet and design a priveta addressing scheme and worry 
about the Internet in the future?

Is it feasible to map a private addressing scheme onto an Internet address 
space if we get one in the future?  what if only a few of the users 
want Internet access?  Can we map an arbitrary subset of our users into 
a small (class C?) Internet address space?

Surely someone has addressed similar problems in the past?

Paul Mitchell


-----------[000166][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 17:04:58 GMT
From:      art@acc.com (Art Berggreen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: traceroute vs. MacTCP/ARA

In article <39ipus$ki6@cmcl2.NYU.EDU> roy@mchip00.med.nyu.edu (Roy Smith) writes:
>	My Mac at home is connected to my campus lan using MacTCP 2.0.4 over
>an ARA connection to a Novell NetConnect box  Everything seems to be working
>fine, but when I try and do a traceroute from the Ultrix box I'm logged into
>back to my Mac, I get:
>
>traceroute to 128.122.244.106 (128.122.244.106), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets
> 1  medgwa (128.122.205.1)  4 ms  4 ms  4 ms
> 2  * * *
> 3  * * *
>[more of the same deleted to save space]
>28  * * *
>29  * * *
>30  *
>
>128.122.244.106 is my Mac, medgwa is a cisco AGS+.  I'm not sure of the
>exact topology, but the NetConnect is either on a network directly connected
>to medgwa, or there might be one other AGS+ between them.
>
>What's happening here?  Is something just eating the ICMP messages?  Or are
>*neither* the NetConnect box nor MacTCP generating them?  It not clear in my
>mind whether the NetConnect box should even be generating ICMPs, since it's
>not really routing IP, it's encapsulating IP inside AT, then routing the AT
>packets.  But, even then, I should be getting them from the Mac, unless
>MacTCP is just broken and doesn't generate the ICMP PORT_UNREACHABLE
>messages it's supposed to.

I'd suspect that the Mac is not generating the ICMP Port Unreachable.  That's
not something I'd be surprised to find out wasn't implemented in a Mac TCP/IP
driver (especially encapsulated inside AT), and the behavior is the same as
other boxes I've seen which don't do ICMP Port Unreachables.

Art

-----------[000167][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 08 Nov 94 01:36:46 PDT
From:      pp001529@interramp.com
To:        vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.ucx,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.tcpware,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.multinet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Master Server TCP



I am currently using DEC TCP/IP Services (UCX V3.1) under Alpha
AXP OpenVMS V6.1.  I want to set up a "Master TCP Server" and have one
"slave server" that manages each connection.  The master server
does the socket() and accept() calls, and I want to spawn another
process, pass the file descriptor to it and do write() and read()
calls.  All this under VMS. We also are needing about 35 connections.

I really don't care if I use QIO or C RTL calls.  THe whole system
runs under DCL, and there are lots more processes using global memory.

How does one do this under VMS?  Under UNIX I just fork() a process.

Do I need to set something up in UCX> first besides the port services (like
/etc/services)?  

I have heard things about AST, $ASSIGN and IO$DEACCESS. If this is part of
a possible solution, please send code, or explain again. I saw
an interesting thread but it has been deleted on my local site.

BTW, we have no ideas if we are staying with UCX but would like to get
the program working and evaluate performance options later.  UCX
seems to be supported on other products, and BSD socket calls seem
supported also.







-----------[000168][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 20:04:32 GMT
From:      barnett@grymoire.crd.ge.com (Bruce Barnett)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   use of select() on output-bound sockets

I am writing a high speed (hopefully) UDP-based server
on a few UNIX systems and was wondering about the use of select and
output-bound packets.

Assume I am reading from one socket, and writing to another socket,
do I need to monitor, via select, the output file descriptors?

As I understand it, the exceptions are only used by OOB on TCP.
Therefore do I need to monitor the exceptions file descriptors?

In other words, can I simply use

	if ((nfound = select(nfds,&ifdset, 0, 0, &timeout)) < 0) {

instead of 

	if ((nfound = select(nfds,&ifdset, &ofdset, &efdset, &timeout)) < 0) {

When would I need to monitor an output file descriptor? What about
exceptions?  Under what conditions is this necessary/desirable? Is it
only useful when writing to a disk?
--
Bruce Barnett <barnett@crd.ge.com> uunet!crdras!barnett

-----------[000169][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 20:46:29 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: RFC for IRC?

Chris Smolinski (cps@access.digex.net) wrote:
: Can someone tell me which RFC describes the protocols used to implement IRC?
 
: Thanks,
 
: Chris

Chris:

If someone replies to you directly, could you - please - post the reply here.
I would also like to know more about implementation of IRC.

Thanks in advance.

TB (toyboy - It is my wife's nickname for me.)
           - Visit alt.clothing.sneakers and then participate.
           - Finally, get others to participate!

-----------[000170][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 20:47:33 GMT
From:      toyboy@gate.net (toyboy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: NNTP, which RFC(s) specifies it?

johnam (johnam@bart.datastorm.com) wrote:
: Which RFC(s) define the NNTP specification?  Are there any good documents
: out there on this subject?
 
: thanks
: jam

Johnam:
 
I agree.

TB (toyboy - It is my wife's nickname for me.)
           - Visit alt.clothing.sneakers and then participate.
           - Finally, get others to participate!

-----------[000171][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 21:42:11 +0000
From:      Andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sys.pyramid
Cc:        SZander@tyndall.com.au
Subject:   Re: BOOTP support for OSx or DC/OSx

In article <SZander.2.00139F62@tyndall.com.au>
           SZander@tyndall.com.au "Tyndall Australia Ltd" writes:

> 
> I have just added some HP 4Si MX laser printers to the network here.  Novell
> talks to them fine but for TCP/IP support they expect to use BOOTP/TFTP.  I
> can do the second but not the first.
> 
> Is anyone aware of a BOOTPD for OSx or DC/OSx??  Source code would be
> fine, I'm quite happy to shoe-horn it.
> 
> Also, has anyone had any experience with programming/access ing these 
> printers accross the 'net.  HP sell drivers for HP-UX and Sun/Solaris but I
> don't have either.  Don't know if the box acts like and lpd print server, SVR4
> (uugh!) or is proprietary.

We have one. I played with it from one of our proprietry operating systems,
and found I could simply send it a file over TCP into port 9100 and it printed
it! (Initially, I tried a Telnet connection which sort of worked, except it
printed the Telnet negotiation sequences, so I guessed it wanted raw data
over TCP.)

I don't know if this is its behaviour 'out of the box' or if it had previously
been configured to work this way.
-- 
Andrew Gabriel                        Home: Andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk
                                      Work: Andrew.Gabriel@gpt.co.uk

-----------[000172][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      7 Nov 1994 21:54:31 GMT
From:      Dave Crocker <dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu>
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP????

In article <J8yXTdU.siscoinfo@delphi.com> SISCO  Inc, siscoinfo@delphi.com
writes:
>We have utility customers that want to have 5 million (and more) IP
 addresses
>on a public network that they can interconnect with other utlities. This
 would
>deplete the address space too quickly using IP or IPng which would force
 them
>into a private network (which they don't want). This is their requirement...

You are asserting that the 16 byte address space of IPng will not
be sufficient for the 5+ M addresses needed by the utilities?  I'd
be quite interested in hearing the basis for that assertion...

>Other functional requirements not addressed by TCP/IP is the lack of any
>standard messaging service for performing real-time data acquisition and
>supervisory control...this is what MMS provides.

I'm used to hearing MMS refer to the Map/Top effort at email.  Please
forgive my ignorance of its use for real-time communication; and please
elaborate.  What real-time protocol is currently deployed and usable
that is sufficient.

By way of abbreviating the turn-around time on this exchange, here
are some responses to what I'm guessing you MIGHT mean:

1.  email:  Internet email is quite solid, robust, deployed, etc.
It offers as good or better performance to any of the alternatives,
as nearly as I can tell.  There are, however, no delivery service
guarantees, but I'm not aware of them for any other email service,
either.

2.  Internet-layer datagram delivery guarantees:  There is R&D work
underway, but certainly not yet delivered, to add 'flows' to IP for
permitting real-time video, etc.  Again, I'm not aware of any alternative
that is farther along in development.

3.  ???

/d 
--------------------
Dave Crocker
Brandenburg Consulting                          Phone:  +1 408 246 8253
675 Spruce Dr.                                  Fax:    +1 408 249 6205
Sunnyvale, CA  94086               Email:  dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu

-----------[000173][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 7 Nov 1994 23:31:47 +0000
From:      Andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Cc:        jybarnes@crl.com
Subject:   Re: Should I ack all TCP data received even if dropped?

In article <38icgq$fbt@crl10.crl.com> jybarnes@crl.com "Jym Barnes" writes:

>    Do most TCPIP stack developers follow the TCP spec and ack all data
>   received even if the data is dropped because of buffer overflow?

I implemented the stack in our proprietry operating system (OS4000).
I have a receive buffer per connection (size specified by the user),
and I advertise a window which never exceeds the amount of free space
in the receive buffer. I trim received data to fit within the window
previously advertised. I then acknowledge this amount of data. This
will only be less than the amount sent if the sending TCP has exceeded
my advertised window (and some TCPs do seem to do this routinely).
The ACK is sent immediately, before passing data to the user (who
might not have a read outstanding anyway).

>   I am presently developing my third TCPIP stack and previously I would
>   not ack data unless I could handle the data.  Looking at the spec I 
>   have noticed that data is supposed to be acked regardless.  Maybe
>   my interpetation is in error.  If I ack data that is latter dropped
>   and then send an ack value which is less then I sent earlier I think
>   this is going to cause major problems for other stacks.

Yes, so do I. Your TCP stack/process/driver (whatever you call it)
should never need to drop acked data, and you can't wind the ack value
backwards - the sending TCP, having had an ack, will have thrown
away the data by now anyway, and your ack value would be invalid.

There does seem to be a way of recovering the situation if you
find you have less buffering than you originally advertised. I have
observed this behaviour in some TCP implementations (terminal
servers), although I hasten to add, I've never done this myself.
If you receive too much data due to previously advertising too big
a window, send an ack for what you can buffer together with a window
of zero, and throw the rest away. The TCP spec says you shouldn't
shrink the window like this, but you must allow for others doing it!
However, I would try to find another way of implementing which
didn't require this at all.
-- 
Andrew Gabriel                        Home: Andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk
Consultant Software Engineer          Work: Andrew.Gabriel@gpt.co.uk

-----------[000174][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 08 Nov 1994 14:26:40 -0600
From:      scouten@uiuc.edu (Eric Scouten)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: NNTP, which RFC(s) specifies it?

In article <39lioa$e6n@golf.ustores.missouri.edu>,
johnam@bart.datastorm.com (johnam) wrote:

> Which RFC(s) define the NNTP specification?  Are there any good documents
> out there on this subject?

RFC 977 is the spec for NNTP. I don't know of any other books/documents.
(Would be interested, however...)

The URL is:  <ftp://ds.internic.net/rfc/rfc977.txt>

-es

__________________________________________________________________________
Eric Scouten <scouten@uiuc.edu> * MS Comp Sci, Univ of Illinois

In times of change, it is the learners who will inherit the earth while the
learned will find themselves beautifully equipped for a world that no
longer exists.
   -Anonymous

-----------[000175][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 07 Nov 1994 15:17:00 +0800
From:      Ch.Wong@f119.n700.z6.ftn.air.org (Ch Wong)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   FTP window telent problem

Hi,

I am using ftp pc/tcp version 2.3.  We would like to use the wtnvt (window
telnet program) to connect to a VAX host.

The connection is ok, and the emulation is satisfactory (but I can't found a TTF which can represent the box character correcly on the screen).

But my headache is when we try to print something through my local printer. It would print garbages if I select the generic/ascii printer.  If I choose the Epson LQ-1050 printer, it hang up my PC.

Do you have this kind of headache as well?  Do you have any ideas or suggestion?  Please give me a hand!  Thank you very much!

Ivan Wong
P.S.  I use the vt print capture escape sequence for my printing job by
      embeding <ESC>[5i in my body text to start the print job.  and
       <ESC>[4i at the end of my body text to stop the print job.


 ÿÿÿ
 * Origin: + Direct Link + 3.5Giz + 428-3625 + MultiLines + (6:700/119)

-----------[000176][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 08 Nov 94 11:58:18 PDT
From:      kld@mudshark.sunquest.com
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Know any good classes?


Hey Ya'll --

I'm a system administator for an environment with a RISC/6000 and a bunch
of PCs. I need to find a good week long seminar on tcp/ip with enough detail
to bring me up to an administators level of understanding. I need to learn
how socket based applications work and I'm sure a million other things I don't
know what to call. No SNA based classes though.

One in Salt Lake City, Utah would be preferable, but all suggestions are
more than welcome.

                               Thanx for taking the time,

                                            Karen Dickerson




-----------[000177][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      8 Nov 1994 05:43:19 GMT
From:      fish9701@cs.nyu.edu
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   run Xapps on server over slip

I would like to run xapps while logged into a srever over slip or
PPP.  I have tried a few things, so if someone could answer with
exact command instructions (setenv DISPLAY my.ip:0.0 the xhost + what?)
I would appreciate it...



-----------[000178][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 8 Nov 1994 06:15:29 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: MTU Question for the Experts...

In article <rballard.907.2EBEDEC4@fox.nstn.ca> rballard@fox.nstn.ca (Rick Ballard) writes:
>In article <CyvtCG.9vG@cfa.org> peisch@cfa.org (Peter Eisch) writes:
>
>>Our frame-relay carrier has suggested lowering the mtu on our router's WAN
>>ports to better match the mtu of the trunking hardware.  This means
>>dropping the mtu from the uncontested 1500 to 512 bytes.  The only
>>protocol on the net is IP.
 
> ...
>Read RFC0879.txt (on choosing best mtu and mss) and RFC1144.PS (on VJ 
>compressed slip) from ds.internic.net, directory /rfc - for some indepth 
>discussion on this subject. According to the rfcs, the -minimum- packet buffer 
>a host (or I should imagine a router) is -required- to have on the internet is 
>576 bytes. There are some newer rfcs on frame relay. The main problem with 
>mtu=1500 is that a remote host with a smaller mtu may not even accept a packet 
>of that size, it will not be able to reassemble the fragments if it is 
>fragmented, and will not be able to buffer it anyway if it is not. Of course 
>these rfcs assume you are sending packets over the internet.


RFC-879 is not the most recent RFC that includes rules for MTU's.  More
recent by 6 years are the Host Requirements, RFC-1122 and 1123.  However,
more things change between 1989 and 1994 than between 1983 and 1989.
For several years it has been common practice to ignore the old rules
and use an MTU of 1500 in the Internet.

For remote hosts and with TCP (but not UDP), there is no problem no
matter what the remote host wants.  The TCP MSS negotiation takes care
of that.

If the frame relay vendor in question cannot handle 1500 byte IP packets,
you should seriously consider finding a vendor with a clue.  My guess
is that either the vendor was misunderstood, or is blowing smoke.


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000179][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      08 Nov 1994 07:56:27 GMT
From:      filo@konishiki.stanford.edu (David Filo)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Why does my socket based server occasionally hang?

I have an HTTP server (under OSF/1 on a alpha) that is basically the
following loop.  The details are omitted (all the various error
checking is done).

while(1) {
  accept;
  if (!fork()) {
    setsockopt(LINGER);
    serve_document();
    exit;
  }
}

The server works fine most of the time.  However, once in a while it
will hang refusing to accept new connections.  At this time the server
is in the accept() call.  When it hangs there isn't necessarily a
large number of outstanding children.  Sending it a SIGHUP and having
it retry the accept does no good.  After waiting some amount of time
(up to 30 minutes at times) will result in the server coming back to
life.  The only other solution is to kill it and start another.  By
the way, this same behavior is seen in NCSA's HTTP server.

Is this an OSF/1 bug or could it be something else?  That is, is there
anything I can do about it?  I'm not running out of processes or file
descriptors.  It definitely gets stuck in the accept for no apparent
reason.  Is there some setsockopt that would help?  Would something in
netstat help me track this down?

Another related question is what limits the performance of such a
server (i.e. one with little computation)?  This server can seem to
handle around 100 connections per second max.  The load is reasonable
at this point and the network is far from saturated.  It seems that
there is some limit on how fast socket connections can be made.  Are
there any kernel parameters that would effect this?

Any help on these problems would greatly be appreciated.

Thanks..

David Filo
filo@konishiki.stanford.edu

-----------[000180][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      8 Nov 1994 08:56:46 GMT
From:      Jan Hinrich Menzler <menzler.pad@sni.de>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.protocols.smb,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Accessing LAN Manager resources through a router

In <39crfd$lkv@sgi.iunet.it> eb@iunet.it (Enrico Badella) writes:

Hallo !

>My PC is uses Microsoft Lan Manager (2.2 I think) to access resources
>on a HP-9000 server using LMU. Now I came accros the need of accessing other
>resources on a similar server that is on a different subnet separated
>by a router (also HP). I have tried configuring my lmhosts, hosts files
>but with no result.

Normaly you should be able to access the resources after configuring
your lmhosts file with the LMU-Servername and his IP-Adress.
For example 'net view \\servername' should work.


>Using tcpdump I managed to look at what my PC sends out and discovered
>that it will always does a broadcast on the subnetwork it's on instead
>of using the address of the server on the other side of the network.

One idea is, to reconfigure your broadcast adress. For an first test
take the IP-Adress of the system you want to connect to as your
broadcast adress. Your can only get a connection to THIS server then,
it's only for a test ...

protocol.ini:

[TCPIP_XIF]
...
bcastaddr = 111 222 333 444     (server ip-adress)
...

If you're still not able to connect to this server, only a sniffer
can help you :-(

>I called HP support and they told me that this is how Lan Manager is 
>supposed to work. So how can I use something on the other side of the
>router wall?  Browsing through the manuals I saw there is a
>replication service, but I couldn't get my sysadm to try setting it up.
 
>Any suggections?

Hope this will help you ...

>Thanks in advance

Greetings

Jan Hinrich Menzler

--------------------------------------+-------------------------------------
Siemens Nixdorf Informationssyteme AG | FAX:   (+49) 5251-8-15499
	Jan Hinrich Menzler           | Voice: (+49) 5251-8-15382  (office)
	Dep.  SU MR PD 423            |        (+49) 171-403-9-303 (mobile)
	Heinz-Nixdorf-Ring 1          | Email: menzler.pad@sni-usa.com
 33106  Paderborn, Germany            |        menzler.pad@sni.de
--------------------------------------+-------------------------------------

-----------[000181][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 8 Nov 1994 09:16:35 GMT
From:      galileoswieng@cix.compulink.co.uk ("Galileo Internationa")
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: IP addressing strategies

> How should we arrange our addresses?  Should we apply for a segment of 
> Internet address space now even if we'll probably never use it?  Should 
> we ignore the Internet and design a priveta addressing scheme and worry 
> about the Internet in the future?
Grab a suitable range of internet addresses,either a class B or a large 
enough range of class C.  It will make life much easier if you decide you 
want to connect to the Internet later.

> Is it feasible to map a private addressing scheme onto an Internet
> address space if we get one in the future?  what if only a few of the
> users want Internet access?  Can we map an arbitrary subset of our
> users into a small (class C?) Internet address space?
This is an option but the odds are that your small number of users will 
all be in seperate parts of the company and so part of different subnets. 
 Better to go for "real" Internet addresses on day 1 and avoid the 
hassle.  You could go for a "private" addressing scheme, I believe a lot 
of people are using class A address 10 (need to check that) as a private 
IP address space that is not advertised.  They then have to run gateways 
to convert from their internal address space to an external IP address 
(which could be a small range of numbers)

Hope this helps

Regards
Antony

-----------[000182][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      8 Nov 1994 23:14:41 -0800
From:      fgodino@crl.com (Frank Godino)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,alt.dcom.slip-emulators,comp.dcom.modems
Subject:   Re: Q: tslip connection to variable-ip-address server

This is an interesting problem... This problem MUST be typical for many 
TIA users with shell accounts from IP providers..

I think most IP pruividers run workstation 'clusters' .
HOW DO YOU KNOW your HOST ADDRESS since you don't
 know which host you are logged into. So it can change but you must 
set the host address in your client side 'gateway address'???

I guess we need to run the tia -address friom the login script then
correct the gateway address and go from there..

I hopeing I am wrongQ!!!

IP address to report as the gateway???


In article <geoffCynHx8.1Et@netcom.com> you wrote:
: I have tslip 2.8.2 running on under SVR4.0.3 on a 486 PC. The server I'm
: dialing into assigns the IP address of the connection to the port (modem)
: so there's no way to determine in advance what my IP address will be.
 
: tslip uses an autodial feature (borrowed from Taylor uucp), so the making
: on the connection (and the discovery of today's IP address) is burried
: in the connection code.
 
: Any experience and/or suggestions?
: -- : Geoffrey Leach          C/C++/X11/Motif/OpenLook Implementation : geoff@netcom.com        Mountain Ranch Software :                         P.O. Box 336 :                         Mountain Ranch CA  95246 :                         209-754-1869
 Geoffrey Leach (geoff@netcom.com) wrote:
: I have tslip 2.8.2 running on under SVR4.0.3 on a 486 PC. The server I'm
: dialing into assigns the IP address of the connection to the port (modem)
: so there's no way to determine in advance what my IP address will be.
 
: tslip uses an autodial feature (borrowed from Taylor uucp), so the making
: on the connection (and the discovery of today's IP address) is burried
: in the connection code.
 
: Any experience and/or suggestions?


: -- 
: Geoffrey Leach          C/C++/X11/Motif/OpenLook Implementation
: geoff@netcom.com        Mountain Ranch Software
:                         P.O. Box 336
:                         Mountain Ranch CA  95246
:                         209-754-1869

-----------[000183][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 04:50:09 -0800
From:      cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Why does my socket based server occasionally hang?

David Filo (filo@konishiki.stanford.edu) wrote:
: I have an HTTP server (under OSF/1 on a alpha) that is basically the
: following loop.  The details are omitted (all the various error
: checking is done).
 
: while(1) {
:   accept;
:   if (!fork()) {
:     setsockopt(LINGER);
:     serve_document();
:     exit;
:   }

FYI

add } else {
	/* I'm the parent (check for -1 return for errors) */

	close(new_fd);
  }

Your parent might be running upt to it's max fd's open, or the
system might be running out of max fds.  I know OSF is more 
dynamic in the way kernel structs are allocated but this may be 
a good idea to minimize the number of open fd's.

Are you running OSF v3.0 ?  Try upgrading or asking DEC if there was
any squerrellyness.  Also note that OSF's TCP stack is NOT streams
based.  It's true Berkeley as are all of there protocols including
X.25, build into the kernel as apposed to a stream, so poll()
does not work, only select().

Good luck.


: }
 
: The server works fine most of the time.  However, once in a while it
: will hang refusing to accept new connections.  At this time the server
: is in the accept() call.  When it hangs there isn't necessarily a
: large number of outstanding children.  Sending it a SIGHUP and having
: it retry the accept does no good.  After waiting some amount of time
: (up to 30 minutes at times) will result in the server coming back to
: life.  The only other solution is to kill it and start another.  By
: the way, this same behavior is seen in NCSA's HTTP server.
 
: Is this an OSF/1 bug or could it be something else?  That is, is there
: anything I can do about it?  I'm not running out of processes or file
: descriptors.  It definitely gets stuck in the accept for no apparent
: reason.  Is there some setsockopt that would help?  Would something in
: netstat help me track this down?
 
: Another related question is what limits the performance of such a
: server (i.e. one with little computation)?  This server can seem to
: handle around 100 connections per second max.  The load is reasonable
: at this point and the network is far from saturated.  It seems that
: there is some limit on how fast socket connections can be made.  Are
: there any kernel parameters that would effect this?
 
: Any help on these problems would greatly be appreciated.
 
: Thanks..
 
: David Filo
: filo@konishiki.stanford.edu

-----------[000184][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      8 Nov 1994 15:52:35 GMT
From:      MyTH@ucx.lkg.dec.com (M. T. Hollinger)
To:        vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.ucx,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.tcpware,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.multinet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Master Server TCP

In article <NEWTNews.8147.784287994.pp001529@pp001529.interramp.com> pp001529@interramp.com writes:
>I am currently using DEC TCP/IP Services (UCX V3.1) under Alpha
>AXP OpenVMS V6.1.  I want to set up a "Master TCP Server" and have one
>"slave server" that manages each connection.  The master server
>does the socket() and accept() calls, and I want to spawn another
>process, pass the file descriptor to it and do write() and read()
>calls.  All this under VMS. We also are needing about 35 connections.
>
>I really don't care if I use QIO or C RTL calls.

We're working to get the sockets passed automatically to child processes
when you use vfork(), but that functionality won't be available until
the next version of the DEC C RTL.  For now, if you don't care, it's
probably easier to use the QIO interface.

As long as the child process has the SHARE privilege or the parent
process sets the UCX$C_SHARE socket option, you should be able to do I/O
from both processes.  Since you ask, I'll mail you a sample pair of
programs (parent and child) which demonstrate this capability.

One restriction, which we hope to ease in a future version, is that when
the parent deassigns its channel, operations the child has pending on
that device are cancelled.  For example, if the child is waiting for
input (blocked on an IO$_READVBLK QIO) when the parent deassigns its
channel to the device, the operation will complete with SS$_CANCEL.  To
avoid this problem, you can either:

      1) Have a handshake process where the child notifies the parent
         it has successfully assigned a channel, then waits for the
         parent to deassign it before doing any I/O.

      2) Have the parent just leave the channel open until the child
         process terminates (as detected by a termination mailbox, for
         example).

      3) Have the child process ignore the SS$_CANCEL code and just
         retry the operation.

Note that there are other design options too, including the use of
DECthreads (or your own multithreading approach) rather than using
multiple processes.  Yet another possibility is to have the child
processes communicate with the parent through mailboxes, and let the
parent handle all network I/O; that's sometimes appropriate when the
child is doing a compute-intensive operation with minimal I/O over the
network.

         - MyTH

-----------[000185][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 8 Nov 1994 17:26:20 GMT
From:      mmp@crash.cts.com (MMP)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   SLIP for 4.1.3_u1

I am having a terrible time trying to get slip working on my sun 
properly.  If anyone has actually got it to work please fill me in on 
what slip package you're using, and if there was anything special needed 
in order to make it work.  Thanks in advance

jeromie@mmp.com


-----------[000186][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 8 Nov 1994 17:26:41 GMT
From:      mmp@crash.cts.com (MMP)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Security Seminar

Subject: Security Seminar
Newsgroups: comp.security.unix
Organization: CTS Network Services (CTSNET), San Diego, CA
Summary: 
Keywords: 

Subject: Security Seminar
Newsgroups: comp.security.misc
Organization: Garrison Associates
Summary: UNIX/Network Security Class
Keywords: Security firewall router filtering encryption


			GARRISON Presents
			   A Course on 

		D I G I T A L   S E C U R I T Y
		-------------------------------

	
Locations:	November 30, 1994
		Embassy Suites Hotel
		San Diego, CA 

		December 6, 1994
		Red Lion Hotel
		Irvine, CA

		(other dates available)

FEE:		$425


Course Description: This course provides a detailed analysis of digital
crimes & preventative measures.  Th8ze course focuses on network security,
host security, & user authentication.  In addition, the course covers
issues relating to PBX/telephone system security, and general business
operation vulnerabilities.  The emphasis is to inform attendees of the
volatility of all companies, to analyze the different types of security
breaches, and to offer practical methods to detect and deter intrusion.
Throughou t the course, numerous products (both commercial & public
domain) will be evaulated (ie. one-time password products, encryption, and
host auditing tools). 


Class Length: 1 Day

Target Audience: MIS Directors, Security Managers, Systems Administrators, 
	& other technical staff concerned with corporate security issues.

Prerequisites:	Basic understanding of the functionality of TCP/IP, UNIX and
	Internet services

Course Outline:
		The Severity of Digital Crimes
		Intrusion Evaluation
			Past & Present Security Breaches
			Intrusion  techniques
		Analysis of Security Breaches
			Business Operations Breaches
			Telephone Toll / PBX Breaches
				Voice Mail Fraud
				Call Diverter Fraud
				DISA Fraud
				SAC Vulnerabilities
				Auto Attendant Fraud
				Calling Card Fraud
				Cellular Fraud
				Pager Fraud
			Computer Security Breaches
				Password integrity
				Network connectivity 
				File system integrity
				Firewalls
				Encryption
				OS holes/patches
				Race Conditions
				Insufficient Authorization
				Cross-Platform code vulnerabilties
				TCP/IP service vulnerabilities
				Trusted Hosts
				Data Restrictions
				File Transfers
				Security Policies
				Employee Training


For further information, contact GARRISON Associates at

GARRISON Associates
11772 Sorrento Valley Rd #123
San Diego, CA 92121
(619) 793-8223    Fax: (619) 793-1124
E-MAIL: garrison@mmp.com


^LRegistration           Please Complete As Appropriate

============             ==============================

Name                    ________________________________________________

Company/Institution     ________________________________________________

Mailing Address         ________________________________________________

City, State ZIP         ________________________________________________

Telephone Number        ________________________________________________

FAX Number              ________________________________________________

Email Address           ________________________________________________


Course Location  (Please check one)
================

        Location        Tutorial Date           Preregistration Deadline
        --------        -------------           ------------------------
[ ] 	San Diego	November 30, 1994	November 25, 1994
[ ]	Irvine		December  6, 1994	December  2, 1994
	---	Other Dates Available  ---


Course Fee (Please check one)

[ ]   $425 per student if received on or before the preregistration deadline.

[ ]   $450 per student if received after the preregistration deadline.

Fee includes admission, lunch, and a course notebook containing copies of the
slides and selected reference information.


Payment 
=======

Payment must be submitted with a completed registration form.  Garrison
Associates accepts checks, Visa & MasterCard.  If you are going to pay via
credit card you may fax your registration & payment to 619-793-1124. 
		DO NOT SEND CREDIT INFORMATION VIA EMAIL!

[ ]	Payment enclosed.  Make checks payable in U.S. Dollars to Garrison 
	Associates.

[ ]	Charge to:	[ ] Visa	[ ] MasterCard

Account Number          ________________________________________________

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Cardholder's Name       ________________________________________________

Cardholder's Signature  ________________________________________________




-----------[000187][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      8 Nov 1994 18:14:10 GMT
From:      gds@york.cs.ucla.edu (Greg Skinner)
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing question: Getting a Sun to route

In article <NEWTNews.13306.784143749.leo@apache.elmail.co.uk> Leo.Smith@elmail.co.uk writes:
>[suggestions to correct routing problem using static routes]
 
>I hope that helps. If you want some excellent examples and have a
>PostScript printer, I strongly suggest downloading the Morningstar
>manuals from ftp.morningstar.com - and the code is even better than
>the manuals by the way (not free tho) There are step by step
>isntruction son setting up exactly this kind of setup.

If you have Morningstar PPP, you should probably use their proxy ARP
package instead of setting up static routes.  You will need to
configure the machines on your LAN so they will ARP for all IP
addresses, not just for IP addresses on the LAN.  On Unix machines,
this is typically done by setting up routes to default out the LAN
interface with metric 0.

--gregbo

-----------[000188][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 8 Nov 1994 18:54:13 GMT
From:      adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: NNTP, which RFC(s) specifies it?

In article <39lioa$e6n@golf.ustores.missouri.edu>,
                johnam <johnam@bart.datastorm.com> wrote:

>Which RFC(s) define the NNTP specification?  Are there any good documents
>out there on this subject?
>
RFC 977

Aint come across any, but could do with a doc convering the commonly used
X... commands, for eg XTHREAD, XHDR etc.

-- 
Adam

=======================================================================
| Computech  Tel/Fax: 0181 673 7817  email: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk |
=======================================================================

-----------[000189][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 8 Nov 1994 19:49:18 GMT
From:      donp@novell.com (don provan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In article <399ovb$8ek@satisfied.elf.com> jbvb@elf.com (James VanBokkelen) writes:
>The point is that each token in the output of NLST is supposed to be
>directly useable as the argument of a GET or DELE command.

I'm afraid I don't see this requirement anywhere. All RFC-959 says is
that the file names could be used "to further process the files
automatically". It's unfortunate the authors weren't more specific.
They do mention multiple gets, but that's not conclusive because a
multiple get which includes the entire directory tree would require
the subdirectories to be listed.

>If a
>server includes directories, it must be prepared to do something that
>won't surprise the client in response to a GET of a directory.

That's a reasonable solution. What would you propose? I'd consider a
new error code that indicates the file name represents a directory,
although I suppose that might surprise some clients.

>If a server prepends a path, this can cause difficulties for clients
>who don't believe "all the world is Unix" (may Cthulu forfend).  For
>MGET, the client needs to create a local filename, and there are
>already enough incompatibilities between name formats, legal
>characters, etc. without making the client scan for the rightmost '/'
>and use only what remains.  See RFC 1123 (Host Requirements) at any
>rate...

It's interesting you should mention this, because I came to the
conclusion that the names *should* include path information while
trying to deal with various FTP servers (typically UNIX) from non-UNIX
clients. What I ran into was the case where the user wants to specify
a path for the multiple get. If you send "NLST /usr/tmp" or, worse,
"NLST /usr/tmp/*.foo" (or, God help me, "NLST /usr/*/*.foo") to a
server that returns only the root names with no path information,
there's no way to make use of the resulting list without knowing the
remote system's way of combining directory information with file
names.

The opposite problem, the one you cite, it at least tractable.  Since
it's a parsing problem, you can basically try everything you know
until you get something that makes sense. For example, most file
systems have a name.extension token at the end of their file names, so
a first order solution of scanning from the end for an unexpected
punctuation character works in many cases -- almost all cases these
days, I think.

					don provan
					donp@novell.com

-----------[000190][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      8 Nov 1994 20:21:06 GMT
From:      thed@mtek.chalmers.se (Thed Lyngmo)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP! Problem when client closes

Adam Goodfellow (adam@comptech.demon.co.uk) wrote:

: >Well, my problem was that I was not checking the return value of recv for 
: >a zero length.  When I did this and had the server close the socket when a zero
: >length message was received, that fixed it.  I suppose it could happen in reverse
: >if the server went away and the client was still trying to receive messages..
 
: Isnt a signal generated when the other end closes? - SIGPIPE or
: something...?

It's possible to set the system up so it generates SIGIO when I/O is possible
or the socket is disconnected.

: I take it nothing else can give rise to zero length reads?

If the socket is set up as NONBLOCKING and you are using SYSTEM_FIVE sockets,
you'll read zero bytes and errno will be set to EWOULDBLOCK when there is
nothing to read.
I think it's a good idea to always treat a zero read with errno set to
EWOULDBLOCK the same way you treat a -1 read with errno set to EWOULDBLOCK.

: Also has anyone got a reliable way of doing a non-blocking connect and
: detecting when the Established state is reached using one of the sockets
: calls, or are non-blocking connects a no-no in BSD?

If the socket is set up as NONBLOCKING and the connect() failes with errno
set to EWOULDBLOCK, you can use the select() call to examine if the socket
is ready for writing. If it is, it's connected. Check out select()'s errno's
for further details.

Kind regards,
Ted Lyngmo

-----------[000191][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      8 Nov 1994 20:34:11 GMT
From:      Larry Gardner <lkg@atl.hp.com>
To:        comp.unix.admin,comp.unix.questions,alt.unix.wizard,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Sending IP # to name server

I've seen this before when DNS admin didn't enter PTR records for the
node in question.  Have your DNS admin group check to see that there
is indeed a db.202.... entry.

Larry Gardner
lkg@atl.hp.com

-----------[000192][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 8 Nov 1994 20:37:43 GMT
From:      donp@novell.com (don provan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In article <39ld14$3e5@martha.utk.edu> hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu (Paul Hethmon) writes:
>The problem is that there is no distinction between directories and
>files with the NLST command. For a person or gui client program to
>understand which is which, they need to see the output of the LIST
>command and parse it. This means that if you write a gui ftp client, you
>have to put code in to parse the output of LIST for every ftp server
>you might encounter.

Another approach I've seen used is to send each name on a CWD command.
The assumption is that if the server allows the current working
directory to be set, then the name was a directory. That works with
most FTP servers, anyway.

>Maybe it's time to update the standard with something like a 
>DLST for directories and FLST for files only. The other thing that
>would be useful would be a file listing that contained names and
>sizes only. Perhaps a FLST command could return a list of files with
>sizes.

What would seem more in line with what most file systems currently
support is a new list command that includes both data files and
directories but provides additional information in a standard format
about which are which. Most OSes normally return both data files and
directory names when a directory listing command is executed. Why not
use that more typical approach instead of trying to segregate the
directories? Is suppression of directories already the prevaling
behavior?

						don provan
						donp@Novell.com

-----------[000193][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 8 Nov 1994 21:25:31 +0000 (GMT)
From:      Stu Mitchell <stu@lab.r1.fws.gov>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Dynamic IP Addresses?

On Mon, 7 Nov 1994, Jeff Murphy wrote:

> In article <stu.24.001445F0@ash.lab.r1.fws.gov> you wrote:
> >Is there such a thing as a dynamic bootp? I have about 300 machines in a 
> >network and I'd like to hand out ip addresses as needed because they are all 
> >on one physical subnet and it doesn't have 300 addresses available. So instead 
> 
>         look into DHCP.
> 
>         Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
>                 rfcs: 1541 1534 1533 1531
Thank you very much for the information... I'll get the RFC's and see if
if I can find out how to implement the protocol....
> 
> >If that doesn't work, is it possible to have more than one subnet on one 
> >single physical net?
> 
> 	we do this on our ethernet ccts quite a bit.. not sure how it would
> 	work under token ring..
> 

Stu Mitchell				stu@lab.r1.fws.gov
USFWS Forensic Lab			mitchellstu@fws.gov
Ashland, Oregon   			wd4eck@w7oek
    *** These are my opinions, not the Government's ***


-----------[000194][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      8 Nov 1994 21:27:22 GMT
From:      dp@clark.net (Diwakar H. Prabhakar)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   wuarchive-ftpd - query

Hi,

I am trying to install wuarchive-ftpd and I get the following errors
when I try to ftp into the machine:

getpeername (ftpd): Socket operation on a non socket
getsockname (ftpd): Socket operation on a non socket

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks
Diwakar
dhp@dol-esa.gov

-----------[000195][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 9 Nov 1994 00:25:50 GMT
From:      fitz@wang.com (Tom Fitzgerald)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Should I ack all TCP data received even if dropped?

> In article <38icgq$fbt@crl10.crl.com> jybarnes@crl.com "Jym Barnes" writes:
 
> >   I am presently developing my third TCPIP stack and previously I would
> >   not ack data unless I could handle the data.  Looking at the spec I 
> >   have noticed that data is supposed to be acked regardless.  Maybe
> >   my interpetation is in error.  If I ack data that is latter dropped
> >   and then send an ack value which is less then I sent earlier I think
> >   this is going to cause major problems for other stacks.

Andrew@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) writes:

> If you receive too much data due to previously advertising too big
> a window, send an ack for what you can buffer together with a window
> of zero, and throw the rest away. The TCP spec says you shouldn't
> shrink the window like this, but you must allow for others doing it!
> However, I would try to find another way of implementing which
> didn't require this at all.

There's another scheme that follows the spec at the expense of wasted
bandwidth - ack only what you can buffer, return a valid window (original
window minus the amount you accepted), throw the rest of the data away and
pretend you never saw it.  The sender will retransmit since you're still
advertising an open window, so you'll have to ignore that too until you get
some buffer space back.  It's legal since you haven't shrunk the window.
Just pretend the network is dropping packets for a while, until you can
handle the data....

The only thing that would mess this up is a TCP stack that required ACKs to
fall on packet boundaries - it could get confused because you might only
ACK part of a packet.  I've never seen a stack do this, and it is illegal,
but I wouldn't be a bit surprised if there was one out there.

-- 
Tom Fitzgerald    1-508-967-5278    Preserve our electronic natural heritage!
Wang Labs         fitz@wang.com     Save the endangered line-eater!
Lowell MA, USA       Send $$ to the "Line-Eater Preservation Society" Today!

-----------[000196][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 00:33:47 GMT
From:      ccsu@office.ee.ttit.edu.tw (ccsu)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   sendto's maximum size

Is there anyone out there knowing what is the maximum message size of the 
system call of sento and recvfrom. I tried in SunOS4.1 and got maximum
size is 9000 bytes, but I would like to know what kind of  parameter affects
this number. In UDP protocol, the maximum size of a UDP datagram is 64k
bytes. How to write a program so that I can use the maximum datagram
size. Thanks in advance!

- C.C. Su

-----------[000197][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 09 Nov 94 08:47:12 PDT
From:      adar0@routers.com
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing question: Getting a Sun to route



> 	A remote user connects (from his Sun) to our network of Suns via PPP.
> He has set the default route (in /etc/defaultrouter) to be the address
> of the Sun he connects to.  He is able to telnet (and rlogin and
> ping, etc) to our local Sun with no problems.  [The remote modem dials out,
> the local one answers...].  But he would like to also be able to
> connect to other machines on our net, using the the machine he
> physically comes in on as a router.  This isn't working; that is, the
> local machine isn't routing his incoming packets to other local machines.
> [And packets aren't routed out the other way back to his machine either.]
> 
> 	Can anyone help with a few details: First, is it possible for a Sun
> (4.1.3) to do this routing for in incoming/outgoing PPP connection?  Second,
> what is the form of the relevant route (or related) command?  An RTFM (which
> M?) would be OK too.  Thanks in advance to all who reply.....
> 

Ric,
I've read most of the responses others posted to your question and I believe
there is a much easier way to make the Sun at work act as a router.  The
static routes that many suggested might be one approach, but its a typical
manual approach to what should be a function of in.routed.

Look at your /etc/rc.local file and find the entry that starts in.routed;
add the -s option to it.  It should look like

#
# Run routed only if we don't already have a default route installed.
#
defroute="`netstat -n -r | grep default`"
if [ -z "$defroute" ]; then
        if [ -f /usr/etc/in.routed ]; then
                in.routed -s;   echo 'running routing daemon.'
        fi
fi

The Sun will then act as a router IF your LAN routing protocol uses the
RIP routing protocol.  If RIP is running, then all LAN segment updates
broadcasted by routers, other Sun's, etc., will be received by the Sun
at work and announced via the PPP and/or SLIP interfaces to remote 
machines.

Rich Adamson
adar0@routers.com


-----------[000198][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 02:26:55 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

> Is there anyone out there knowing what is the maximum message size of the 
> system call of sento and recvfrom. I tried in SunOS4.1 and got maximum
> size is 9000 bytes, but I would like to know what kind of  parameter affects
> this number. In UDP protocol, the maximum size of a UDP datagram is 64k
> bytes. How to write a program so that I can use the maximum datagram
> size. Thanks in advance!

You need a setsockopt() for the SO_SNDBUF socket option.  Older BSD-derived
systems may not let you really send a full-sized UDP datagram.

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000199][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 03:59:17 GMT
From:      vos@teleport.com (Aron Bartling)
To:        comp.protocols.appletalk,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Appletalk->TCP/IP Router/Gateway

> Yeah full network routing keeps popping up as the best solution...It's jsut
> that I'm such a Mac weenie that I'm determined to have a Mac (not under
> AUX) doing as much (hopefully everything!) as possible. If not a software
> IP router (thre's GOT to be one, and believe me -- the Apple Internet
> Router is *not* it) then perhaps a box (like a shiva fast path, gator box
> etc.) that sits on the ethernet providing IP and IP routing services... of
> course thes guys cost *bucks*...sheesh I'm *so* close :)
> 
> thanks
> ethan miller

Just curious if that is the Apple Internet Router with the IP wide area
extension. If it is I¹d like to hear your opinion on the total package.

Thanks
Aron Bartling
Virtual Office Systems
vos@teleport.com

Aron Bartling
Virtual Office Systems
vos@teleport.com

-----------[000200][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 04:57:09 GMT
From:      mgleason@cse.unl.edu (Mike Gleason)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Revisions to RFC 959. (was Re: FTPD command question)

peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis) writes:

Hi Peter, did you get your free Power Macintosh from Apple yet <drool>?

|My Mac FTP server supports the NDIR command as an equivalent to NLST that
|only lists directories.

Does your server, or any others out there I can test my client with,
implement the "APSV" (all passive) command mentioned in RFC 1579?

NcFTP 2.0 is in the beta testing stage now, but I wanted to see if I could
add support for that because it sounds handy.

I think it's high time that RFC 959 was updated.  SIZE and MDTM are even
formally documented!

On this NLST debate, it would be nice to be able to use it for it's intended
purpose, which I believe was file system information for machine-readable use. 
Unfortunately it isn't too helpful other than being able to give a list of
items out there.  A standard way to have to be able to tell which things
are files and which are directories without having to parse the output would
have been terrific.  The way I have to do it now is to grok the output of
UNIX's "ls -l."  That wouldn't be that bad, but the whole world ain't UNIX,
and even the big chunk that is doesn't use a standard, portable, format
for "ls -l."

I would support something like's Peter's suggestion a long time ago, a new
XLST (??) command to facilitate communication of file system structures.
Item sizes, times (in UTC dammit!), types, permissions, etc.

I would also support a FIND command.  The Funet ftp daemon has a good start
on one.  I like the end result of it, but not the way they implemented it
using the FTP protocol.  I can't remember why, but I wasn't able to hack it
into the new ncftp code without really hacking my code all to hell.

--
===== Mike Gleason <mgleason@cse.unl.edu> ================= Go Huskers! =====
Current version of NcFTP is 1.8.6, and is available from cse.unl.edu, in the
/pub/mgleason/ncftp directory.  Pre-release versions of NcFTP 2.0.0 are 
available in the /pub/mgleason/ncftp/BETA directory.

-----------[000201][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 9 Nov 1994 08:57:33
From:      ace@iesl.forth.gr (Andreas C. Enotiadis)
To:        comp.protocols.appletalk,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Appletalk->TCP/IP Router/Gateway

In article <nrgCypF4B.89t@netcom.com> nrg@netcom.com (Ethan I. Miller) writes:
>From: nrg@netcom.com (Ethan I. Miller)
>Subject: Re: Appletalk->TCP/IP Router/Gateway
>Date: Thu, 3 Nov 1994 18:24:11 GMT
 
>: I got the impression that since one Mac has a PPP connection, and MacTCP 
>: doesn't do routing, you can't also connect that same machine to the local 
>: ethernet (IP-wise) without first disconnecting the PPP link. In other 
>: words, what is needed here is an IP router to allow the machine to access 
>: both links at once.
 
>: This could also be done through multi-homing (preventing the ethernet 
>: from being 'live' on the Internet, for security or other reasons), but 
>: you would still need to have the ANA allocate a (nominally) class C 
>: network address to prevent the multi-homed host from getting confused, 
>: even if the net wasn't visible to the rest of the world.
 
>: The problem is that the only software (at least that *I* know of) that 
>: will let you either route or be multi-homed on a Mac is AUX, which 
>: doesn't show any signs of an upgrade path.
 
>: If I dare say it, about your best bet would be to upgrade the PPP link to 
>: full network routing, find an old 386-16 with a 100MB HD (probably could 
>: be had for <$300-$400 these days), install Linux or FreeBSD (free "Unix" 
>: for the x86) and configure it as a router, and then put your whole 
>: network on the Internet live. Or, you could make it your "firewall" and 
>: run the POP3 server on it, preventing having to expose the rest of the 
>: network (whether that's good or bad depends on your own philosophy).
 
>: Or, if you had an old mac sitting around (though they tend to be more 
>: expensive than old PCs, and AUX isn't free) you could do the same with 
>: AUX. Heck, you could put AUX on the machine that's PPP-linked now. But 
>: the PC/FreeBSD approach keeps you in free software.
 
>: Egads, I wrote a lot. ;) Have fun, and keep us updated.
 
>Yeah full network routing keeps popping up as the best solution...It's jsut
>that I'm such a Mac weenie that I'm determined to have a Mac (not under
>AUX) doing as much (hopefully everything!) as possible. If not a software
>IP router (thre's GOT to be one, and believe me -- the Apple Internet
>Router is *not* it) then perhaps a box (like a shiva fast path, gator box
>etc.) that sits on the ethernet providing IP and IP routing services... of
>course thes guys cost *bucks*...sheesh I'm *so* close :)
 
>thanks
>ethan miller

I have a feeling you can do the routing on a Mac. Get a copy of KA9Q NOS for 
Macintosh and set it up with two interfaces as a router. I know it exists and 
it can be done in principle - i.e. the NOS source supports it. I've only done 
it on PCs using the DOS version of NOS and it worked great. One 386-40 with 
1Meg and a single floppy can route thru 4 serial links at 56 Kbps each and not 
falter for a second.

Good luck and keep us posted

Andreas

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Andreas C. Enotiadis
Internetwork Ltd
"My views DEFINITELY represent those of InterNetwork Ltd - It's mine dammit!"
ace@ics.forth.gr
ace@iesl.forth.gr
ace@praxis.forth.gr
Snail-Mail :7 Fokidos Str, 11526 Athens, Greece. Tel : 7486222-3, Fax 7486223
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000202][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 09 Nov 94 15:55:01 PDT
From:      Noah_Davids@vos.stratus.com
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   bytes received from ping


I've noticed that the local copy of ping reports X+8 bytes received where
X is the number of bytes that I requested it send. As far as I can tell the
extra 8 bytes represent the ICMP header. I've looked at several systems
and Unix Network Programming by R Stevens and they all report the same +8
bytes.

Is there a reason I am missing for including the ICMP header length in the
bytes received count? If it includes the ICMP header why not the IP header?


-----------[000203][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 09 Nov 1994 19:26:57 -0500
From:      acheslow@mindspring.com (Alan Cheslow)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows,comp.protocol.appletalk,comp.protocol.tcp-ip,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.networking,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Re: PC <----> MAC Linking

In article <39r796$a54@ipgate.le.ac.uk>, ggo1@le.ac.uk (G.G. Owenson) wrote:

:Is it possible to link in some way a Mac (performa 475) and a PC (386)
:directly using an ethernet network?
 [deleted]
:Mac - OS 7.5
:PC  - Dos 5, Win 3.1, MCA
:Network - Novell ver ? (4)

If you have a Novell network, all you need to do is load the Netware for
Mac client software that comes with Netware onto your Macs.

-- 
+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
| Alan Cheslow    | acheslow@mindspring.com  |  Finger for PGP Public Key   |
+ Project Manager |+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
| OneNet I.C.I.   |HOME: http://www.mindspring.com/users/acheslow/Home.html |
+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+

-----------[000204][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      09 Nov 1994 13:12:01 GMT
From:      ldavis@jaguar.vienna.itd.sterling.com (Lynch Davis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Subnetting...

Can anyone provide me with either a nice explanation
of subnets or at least a pointer to a doc or FAQ 
that contains the logic behind these animals?

Thanks in advance,
Lynch

-----------[000205][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 13:58:04 GMT
From:      hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu (Paul Hethmon)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FTPD command question

In message <1994Nov8.203743.9851@novell.com> - donp@novell.com (don provan) wri
tes:
>In article <39ld14$3e5@martha.utk.edu> hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu (Paul Hethmon) writes:
>>The problem is that there is no distinction between directories and
>>files with the NLST command. For a person or gui client program to
>>understand which is which, they need to see the output of the LIST
>>command and parse it. This means that if you write a gui ftp client, you
>>have to put code in to parse the output of LIST for every ftp server
>>you might encounter.
>
>Another approach I've seen used is to send each name on a CWD command.
>The assumption is that if the server allows the current working
>directory to be set, then the name was a directory. That works with
>most FTP servers, anyway.
>

A reasonable approach, but it can burn a lot of bandwidth.

>>Maybe it's time to update the standard with something like a 
>>DLST for directories and FLST for files only. The other thing that
>>would be useful would be a file listing that contained names and
>>sizes only. Perhaps a FLST command could return a list of files with
>>sizes.
>
>What would seem more in line with what most file systems currently
>support is a new list command that includes both data files and
>directories but provides additional information in a standard format
>about which are which. Most OSes normally return both data files and
>directory names when a directory listing command is executed. Why not
>use that more typical approach instead of trying to segregate the
>directories? Is suppression of directories already the prevaling
>behavior?

I think either approach would work well. I tend to think a "DLST" might
be more workable and easier for clients to handle. The server already
knows whats a directory and whats a file, by segregating the replies, the
clients don't have to parse the output of the current LIST or a new
standard format LIST. It's really a minor point which way it's done. I do
think it would be beneficial to support one or the other though.

Anyone want to write a RFC?


Paul Hethmon
Programmer/Analyst & IBM Certified OS/2 Engineer
Agricultural Policy Analysis Center
The University of Tennessee at Knoxville
hethmon@apac.ag.utk.edu  ==  615-974-3666





















-----------[000206][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 15:03:14 GMT
From:      mfw@warburg (Mark White)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP/IP performance software?


Does any-one know of a TCP/IP network performance benchmark suite that 
runs on Sun 4.1.3 and Solaris 2.0 machines? I have an HP net-perf suite, 
but it does not build on our Sun machines.  

We are looking to do performance tests for Sun 
based clients connecting to servers on both Ethernet and FDDI in various 
configurations.  The sort of thing I am looking for is the ability to do file
transfers with different packet sizes and measure the throughput.

Thanks,
mfw


-----------[000207][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 04:43:52 -0800
From:      cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

W. Richard Stevens (rstevens@noao.edu) wrote:
: > Is there anyone out there knowing what is the maximum message size of the 
: > system call of sento and recvfrom. I tried in SunOS4.1 and got maximum
: > size is 9000 bytes, but I would like to know what kind of  parameter affects
: > this number. In UDP protocol, the maximum size of a UDP datagram is 64k
: > bytes. How to write a program so that I can use the maximum datagram
: > size. Thanks in advance!
 
: You need a setsockopt() for the SO_SNDBUF socket option.  Older BSD-derived
: systems may not let you really send a full-sized UDP datagram.

Is the SO_SNDBUF/SO_RCVBUF options setting the "single packet" max sizes
receivable or a queue size that may hold many smaller packets for safe
keeping prior to readin??

..


-----------[000208][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 9 Nov 1994 16:14:42 GMT
From:      tpodowd@tcd.ie (Mr. YELLOW)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   References for IP and IPng wanted!!!

Hi,
	I'm looking for any references with regard to some of the
current problems with IP and some of the solutions offered by IPng.
Also a good overview of both protocols would be handy.

If anyone has any information on the differences between the IPng and
the OSI CLNP, this would also be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Thomas.


-----------[000209][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 9 Nov 1994 17:13:37 GMT
From:      geoff@netcom.com (Geoffrey Leach)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,alt.dcom.slip-emulators,comp.dcom.modems
Subject:   Re: Q: tslip connection to variable-ip-address server

fgodino@crl.com (Frank Godino) writes:

>This is an interesting problem... This problem MUST be typical for many 
>TIA users with shell accounts from IP providers..
 
>I think most IP pruividers run workstation 'clusters' .
>HOW DO YOU KNOW your HOST ADDRESS since you don't
> know which host you are logged into. So it can change but you must 
>set the host address in your client side 'gateway address'???
 
>I guess we need to run the tia -address friom the login script then
>correct the gateway address and go from there..
 
>I hopeing I am wrongQ!!!
 
>IP address to report as the gateway???


>Geoffrey Leach (geoff@netcom.com) wrote:
>: I have tslip 2.8.2 running on under SVR4.0.3 on a 486 PC. The server I'm
>: dialing into assigns the IP address of the connection to the port (modem)
>: so there's no way to determine in advance what my IP address will be.
 
>: tslip uses an autodial feature (borrowed from Taylor uucp), so the making
>: on the connection (and the discovery of today's IP address) is burried
>: in the connection code.

Here's a partial solution.  Use a perl (or other) script to look in the
chat log go the IP address assigned to the session, and then issue
the commands:

	ifconfig sl0 $host
	route add default $host 1

As all this is done in the perl script, its semi-convienent.  The best
solution would be a chat-program (Taylor uucp feature).  I'll post
it when I get it done.


-- 
Geoffrey Leach          C/C++/X11/Motif/OpenLook Implementation
geoff@netcom.com        Mountain Ranch Software
                        P.O. Box 336
                        Mountain Ranch CA  95246
                        209-754-1869

-----------[000210][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 18:23:58 GMT
From:      breed@cse.ucsc.edu (Benjamin Reed)
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing question: Getting a Sun to route

Another reason that your Sun is not routing your packets could be that
you don't have packet forwarding enabled in your SunOS kernel...

ben

Leo.Smith@elmail.co.uk wrote:

: In article <39gufj$8m4@case.cyberspace.com>, <valko@cyberspace.com> writes:
 
: > Richard Steinberger (ric@updike.sri.com) wrote:
: > : 	A remote user connects (from his Sun) to our network of Suns via PPP.
: > : He has set the default route (in /etc/defaultrouter) to be the address
: > : of the Sun he connects to.  He is able to telnet (and rlogin and
: > : ping, etc) to our local Sun with no problems.  [The remote modem dials out,
: > : the local one answers...].  But he would like to also be able to
: > : connect to other machines on our net, using the the machine he
: > : physically comes in on as a router.  This isn't working; that is, the
: > : local machine isn't routing his incoming packets to other local machines.
: > : [And packets aren't routed out the other way back to his machine either.]
 
: > : 	Can anyone help with a few details: First, is it possible for a Sun
: > : (4.1.3) to do this routing for in incoming/outgoing PPP connection?  
 Second,
: > : what is the form of the relevant route (or related) command?  An RTFM 
 (which
: > : M?) would be OK too.  Thanks in advance to all who reply.....
: > 
: > You may want to look at in.routed to pass your routing information around 
: > your subnet.  Check the man page, and you may want to pay attention to how 
: > long routed waits before passing a route around your subnet.
: > 
: It is a matter of great simplicity to set this up.
 
: IF the dial in machine is on the SAME IP network as the rest of your machines 
: then there should be no problem - as soon as he is on line he will appear as 
: another interface on the local network to the SUN he dials in on.
 
: If it is on a different net you need to set up static routes on the machines 
: that it needs to connect to.
 
: E.g.
 
: If the remote machine is 192.0.0.1 and the sun it dials into is 193.0.0.1 and 
: another machine or yoiur net is 193.0.0.2
 
: The remote machine needs a default route added...
 
: route add default 193.0.0.1 1
 
: and the other machines on the network need some routes adding..
 
: route add 192.0.0.1 193.0.0.1 1
 
: This will tell both ends of the link to use the sparc in the middle as a 
: gateway.
 
: You should check all these tables with a netstat -r on the machines.
 
: I hope that helps. If you want some excellent examples and have a PostScript 
: printer, I strongly suggest downloading the Morningstar manuals from 
: ftp.morningstar.com - and the code is even better than the manuals by the way 
: (not free tho) There are step by step isntruction son setting up exactly this 
: kind of setup.




-----------[000211][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 19:17:58 GMT
From:      ggo1@le.ac.uk (G.G. Owenson)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows,comp.protocol.appletalk,comp.protocol.tcp-ip,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.networking,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   PC <----> MAC Linking

Is it possible to link in some way a Mac (performa 475) and a PC (386)
directly using an ethernet network?


We have 2 Macs and a PC, both are connected to fileservers over an ethernet
network (separate servers), and each have unique IP addresses. The 2 Macs
can share data using AppleTalk (AppleShare). However, we have a printer
connected to the PC which should idealy be available to the Macs as well.

The printer is not connected directly to the Ethernet, but only to the
PCs parallel port. I realise it would probably be impossible to print 
directly from the Macs on the PC printer, but is it possible to dump files
from one to the other (At the moment this can be done using a UNIX host, but
this is quite time-consuming).

Can the PC in some way AppleTalk to the Macs and vice-versa. Idealy this
would be a software solution. Or is it possible to make the PC a server, 
which the Macs could logon to using telnet/ftp.

Mac - OS 7.5
PC  - Dos 5, Win 3.1, MCA
Network - Novell ver ? (4)

Any ideas would be grately appreciated.

G. Owenson

-----------[000212][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 9 Nov 1994 21:13:33 GMT
From:      warrier@acsu.buffalo.edu (Chandra C Warrier)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: RFC for IRC?


There is rfc 1459 which talks about Internet Relay Chat Protocol.


-- 
Chandra Chuda Warrier
225 Princeton Avenue, #3, Amherst, NY 14226  
201 Bell Hall, SUNY at Buffalo, Amherst, NY 14260
Ph : (716) 833-5792  /  e-mail : warrier@autarch.acsu.buffalo.edu

-----------[000213][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 9 Nov 1994 21:13:50 GMT
From:      rjinla@netcom.com (Rob Jaczko)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Telnet & downloading ??

Greetings !

I now have a CSLIP account, and I would like to know how to retrieve
files from my shell account. I'm using NCSA Telnet 2.6 to get into my
shell directories, but I'm at a loss after that !!

Any help for a newbie ??

Thanks, 

	Rob

-- 
Rob Jaczko - rjinla@netcom.com
On Site Entertainment - Los Angeles / Boston
URL: ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/rjinla/On_Site_Entertainment/OSE_homepage.html

-----------[000214][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 22:05:44 GMT
From:      prabau@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu (Patrick F Rabau)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Local echoing for Telnet protocol

I need to connect through telnet to a deficient interactive program that
does not do echoing back of the characters it receives.  I want the local
user to see the characters typed at the keyboard.
Actually the server has the ECHO option on, but it just does not echo the 
characters back.
I am using the standard telnet client on SunOS 4.1.3.

One solution would be to have the characters echoed locally instead of using
remote echoing.  Here is what I'd like to know.

How do you go about turning local echo on, i.e., disabling remote echo?

The telnet protocol says that the client can send DONT ECHO to the server
and the server should respond WONT ECHO.  That should do the trick.  But
I could not find any command for the standard Unix telnet client to do just 
that.

I then tried: `mode line' from the default char-at-a-time mode.  
The result is the following: (with `toggle options')

    telnet> mode line
1   SENT dont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD
2   SENT dont ECHO
3   RCVD wont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD (don't reply)
4   RCVD will ECHO (reply)
5   SENT do ECHO (reply)

Isn't this a violation of the telnet protocol?  In line 2, the client says
it wants the remote echoing option turned off.  The server _has_ to
honor the request to disable that option, but it does not: in line 4,
it answers WILL ECHO, to which the poor client agrees once again.
(I checked the same server with a telnet client on a Mac: the `local echo'
menu selection would just not be accepted but that #$!** server.)

So how do you do it?
Any help greatly appreciated.

Patrick
rabau@ultra.acs.ohio-state.edu


-----------[000215][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 23:23:53 GMT
From:      Interface Builders <72160.1106@CompuServe.COM>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   FAQ please

If there is a FAQ for this newsgroup, could someone please send a copy
of it to the Compuserve address below?

Thanks
-- 
Lee Chubb -- Interface Builders -- 72160.1106@compuserve.com

-----------[000216][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      9 Nov 1994 23:43:02 GMT
From:      leonard@telcom.arizona.edu (Aaron Leonard)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP/IP performance software?


In article <39qobi$crv@marble.Britain.EU.net>, mfw@warburg (Mark White) writes:
|
|Does any-one know of a TCP/IP network performance benchmark suite that 
|runs on Sun 4.1.3 and Solaris 2.0 machines? I have an HP net-perf suite, 
|but it does not build on our Sun machines.  
|
|We are looking to do performance tests for Sun 
|based clients connecting to servers on both Ethernet and FDDI in various 
|configurations.  The sort of thing I am looking for is the ability to do file
|transfers with different packet sizes and measure the throughput.

I sure like the tptest program, which slams data at a target
node's TCP DISCARD port.  Unlike TTCP (which you also ought
to check out), it doesn't require code installation on both
sides, as most (or many) TCPs implement and enable the DISCARD
port by default.

You can find it as part of JvNC's NOCOL package:
/pub/jvncnet-packages/nocol on ftp.jnvc.net.

Aaron

Aaron Leonard (AL104), <Leonard@Arizona.EDU>
University of Arizona Network Operations, Tucson AZ 85721
  \ Don't lock yourself into open systems. /

-----------[000217][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      09 Nov 1994 23:46:46 GMT
From:      kerch@reynaldo.PARC.Xerox.Com (Berry Kercheval)
To:        comp.protocols.iso,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: GOSIP????

>>>>> "Dave" == Dave Crocker <dcrocker@mordor.stanford.edu> writes:
    Dave> In article <J8yXTdU.siscoinfo@delphi.com> SISCO Inc,
    Dave> siscoinfo@delphi.com writes:
    >> We have utility customers that want to have 5 million (and
    >> more) IP addresses on a public network that they can interconnect with other
    >> utlities. This would the address space too quickly using IP or IPng which
    >> would force them a private network (which they don't want). This is their
    >> requirement...

    Dave> You are asserting that the 16 byte address space of IPng
    Dave> will not be sufficient for the 5+ M addresses needed by the
    Dave> utilities?  I'd be quite interested in hearing the basis for
    Dave> that assertion...


Indeed, so would I.  16 bytes of address give 2 raised to the (16*8)
or 2^128 address.  That's 340282366920938463463374607431768211456 of
them (thank you, dc).  (that's about 3.4E28 if I counted right.)

Setting the world population at 5 billion, that still leaves
68056473384187692692674921486 (6.8E19?) addresses PER PERSON.  It's a
stupendously large number.  You could give every one of your CELLS its
own IPng address and still have some left over for the gas meter.

Heck, your utility customer can have 5 million of *my* addresses.  I'll
still have 68056473384187692692669921486 left.  Anyone else want to
contribute?

  --berry
--

Berry Kercheval :: kerch@parc.xerox.com 




-----------[000218][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 1994 10:36:17 -0600
From:      scouten@uiuc.edu (Eric Scouten)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Are RFC's available on the NET?

In article <39sp8u$1gb@pheidippides.axion.bt.co.uk>,
CAMERONG@SYNTEGRA.BT.CO.UK wrote:

> Does anyone know whether or not the IP RFC's are available on the NET?

Yes.

  http://ds.internic.net/ds/rfc-index.html
  ftp://ds.internic.net/rfc

In the index, or somewhere near it, there are also pointers to mirrors in
other countries.

> Can they be located by Gopher etc?

I assume there's gopher access, but I don't know the URL right off hand.

> And are they available in Postcript form from anywhere?

Most are ASCII text only; a few are in both ASCII and PS.

-es

__________________________________________________________________________
Eric Scouten <scouten@uiuc.edu> * MS Comp Sci, Univ of Illinois

This response was tantamount to Pat Robertson suggesting that there was historical support for same-sex unions.
   -Jake Widman (Editor, Publish magazine)

-----------[000219][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 14:03:30 -0800
From:      guy@netapp.com (Guy Harris)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Indices to RFCs (was Re: NNTP, which RFC(s) specifies it?)

toyboy <toyboy@gate.net> wrote:
>johnam (johnam@bart.datastorm.com) wrote:
>: Which RFC(s) define the NNTP specification?  Are there any good documents
>: out there on this subject?
 
>: thanks
>: jam
>
>Johnam:
> 
>I agree.

How on earth does one agree with a *question*?

If you meant "I'd like to ask the same questions", the answer to the
first question is "RFC977".

When fetching RFC's from some FTP or UUCP or whatever site, consider
also fetching any "rfc-index" file they have handy - you can search
through that file with whatever text-searching facility you have:

	nova% egrep -i 'network news transfer' rfc-index
	0977  PS    B. Kantor, P. Lapsley, "Network News Transfer Protocol:  A 

and can often find stuff that way.

If you have a WWW browser and Internet access through it, NEXOR, a
company in the UK, has a Web page that lets you do searches in the RFC
index:

	http://web.nexor.co.uk/public/rfc/index/rfc.html

and Ohio State University in the US has a page with links to various
RFCs:

	http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/information/rfc.html

-----------[000220][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 94 09:14:39 PST
From:      bucci@ccgw.open.rd.nttdata.jp
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: VMTP


In article <39bkfo$nc7@Tut.MsState.Edu>, <zhao@ERC.MsState.Edu> writes:

> Can anybody tell me something about VMTP? 
> What kind of protocol is it?  Has it been standardized?
> What's the current status?

VMTP(Versatile Message Transport Protocol) was developed
by Stanford Univ.(Am I correct?)
See RFC1045.  
---
NTT Data Communications Systems Corporation
Hiroaki Usubuchi(bucci@ccgw.open.rd.nttdata.jp)

-----------[000221][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 01:40:02 GMT
From:      mahbub@giaec.cc.monash.edu.au (Mahbub Hassan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP retx - help



The following retransmission method of TCP is not clear to me.  Can
anyone help?  Please reply by email.  Thanks a lot.

What does the source TCP does when it receives an ACK for a
retransmitted packet?  I'm interested in knowing only the following

1) if there is more data pending (unacknowledged) in the send buffer
   does TCP immediately retransmit another segment?

2) If the answer to 1) is NO, does TCP sets another retransmit timer
   for the unacknowledged data in the buffer?


--Mahbub

-----------[000222][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 02:21:35 GMT
From:      raj@cup.hp.com (Rick Jones)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP/IP performance software?

Mark White (mfw@warburg) wrote:

[first thing - might want to check with your news admin to get your
complete email address in there...]  

: Does any-one know of a TCP/IP network performance benchmark suite
: that runs on Sun 4.1.3 and Solaris 2.0 machines? I have an HP
: net-perf suite, but it does not build on our Sun machines.

Netperf should build on either SunOS or Solaris. It might take a
couple of tweaks to the makefile though. Send me some email with a
description of the problem(s) you are encountering and I might be able
to help.

rick jones
shameless promoter of netperf and the netperf database...

-----------[000223][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 1994 03:37:31 GMT
From:      joshua@mutt (Joshua Fairfield)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows,comp.protocol.appletalk,comp.protocol.tcp-ip,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.networking,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Re: PC <----> MAC Linking

Any one who knows anything about doing the ubove, could you please mail me
too at joshua@mutt.cs.jmu.edu.  What i want to do is netwok my computer with
my friend's MAC we both have 10BasedT ethernet cards.  Any help would 
be apreciated.  Thanks again.
X-Newsreader: TIN [version 1.1 PL6]

Joshua.
joshua@mutt.cs.jmu.edu


-----------[000224][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 13:56:04 -0500
From:      dking@gbc.gbrownc.on.ca (Darren King)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Class C --> Class B Routing.

I have a network that consists of many class C networks (132.133.1.xx,
132.133.2.xx, etc...).  My organization's backbone is all based on
class B addresses (132.132.xx.xx).  What are my options for connecting
the two networks?.  I have Novell servers and UNIX machines that could
do software routing if there was such a product.

One idea I had was to put another ethernet interface into a UNIX machine
and connect it to the backbone and assign it a class B address. The 
machine would then forward any addresses that do not begin with 132.133
to the other card and the outside network?  Is this feasible?

any help would help...

dk.
-- 
Darren King, George Brown College :: -> dking@gbrownc.on.ca


-----------[000225][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 16:20:37 -0500
From:      gene@panix.com (Gene)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows,comp.protocol.appletalk,comp.protocol.tcp-ip,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.networking,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Re: PC <----> MAC Linking

G.G. Owenson (ggo1@le.ac.uk) wrote:
: Is it possible to link in some way a Mac (performa 475) and a PC (386)
: directly using an ethernet network?

Yep.  My wife and I have our two computers networked together at home.  She
has a Mac Quadra, I have a Micron Pentium.  We use Farallon's TIMBUKTU PRO
for the Mac, and TIMBUKTU FOR WINDOWS on the PC.  It's a true ethernet
network, we have access to each other's hard drives and full file sharing
capabilities.  We also have her printer (which has an ethernet connection)
available to both computers thru the net.  It's inexpensive, and it does
everything we want!

-gene
gene@panix.com

: We have 2 Macs and a PC, both are connected to fileservers over an ethernet
: network (separate servers), and each have unique IP addresses. The 2 Macs
: can share data using AppleTalk (AppleShare). However, we have a printer
: connected to the PC which should idealy be available to the Macs as well.
 
: The printer is not connected directly to the Ethernet, but only to the
: PCs parallel port. I realise it would probably be impossible to print 
: directly from the Macs on the PC printer, but is it possible to dump files
: from one to the other (At the moment this can be done using a UNIX host, but
: this is quite time-consuming).
 
: Can the PC in some way AppleTalk to the Macs and vice-versa. Idealy this
: would be a software solution. Or is it possible to make the PC a server, 
: which the Macs could logon to using telnet/ftp.
 
: Mac - OS 7.5
: PC  - Dos 5, Win 3.1, MCA
: Network - Novell ver ? (4)
 
: Any ideas would be grately appreciated.
 
: G. Owenson

-----------[000226][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 08:32:40 GMT
From:      cacciam@xsft5.ico.olivetti.com (Marco Caccia)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   DHCP source code

I'm looking for a DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol) implementation.
I'm only interested to the server code for Unix OS.
Does anyone know where I can get this source code ?

Thank you in advance,
                        Marco.

-----------[000227][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 09:31:10 GMT
From:      camerong@syntegra.bt.co.uk (Gary Cameron)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Are RFC's available on the NET?

Does anyone know whether or not the IP RFC's are available on the NET?
Can they be located by Gopher etc?
And are they available in Postcript form from anywhere?

Thank you...

Gary Cameron

----------------------------------------------------------------------
All opinions expressed here my own and not the companies. Maybe...
Gary Cameron

E-mail camerong@leeds.syntegra.bt.co.uk    (ignore imitation copies)
Fon    ++ 44 532 XXXXXX 
----------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000228][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 09:51:06 GMT
From:      danielle@laas.fr (Danielle Barthe)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Scott Bradner tests

Where can I find Scott Bradner 's resutlts tests? 
I can't access them since last month on the server:
gopher://ndtl-gopher.harvard.edu/11/ndtl/results,
Is there an other way to get them?
Many thanks
Danielle

---
_._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._
_._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._

			Danielle BARTHE		LAAS/CNRS 7 av du C.ROCHE
						31077 TOULOUSE CEDEX   FR
						tel. 61.33.64.24
						e-mail danielle@laas.fr
_._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._
_._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._._			


-----------[000229][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 12:28:54 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Local echoing for Telnet protocol

In article <39rh3o$j54@charm.magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu>, prabau@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu (Patrick F Rabau) writes:
[...]
|>     telnet> mode line
|> 1   SENT dont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD
|> 2   SENT dont ECHO
|> 3   RCVD wont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD (don't reply)
|> 4   RCVD will ECHO (reply)
|> 5   SENT do ECHO (reply)
|> 
|> Isn't this a violation of the telnet protocol? [...]

Absolutely.  A telnet implementation must always accept DONT and WONT,
and must always default to all options off (NVT mode).

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000230][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 94 13:08:35 GMT
From:      make@bsoisf.atr.bso.nl (Marc Kelchtermans)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   PC/TCP on ISDN

Currently we are looking at the possibility of installing our E-mail
system on an ISDN network.
The software can run on a TCP/IP stack provided by FTP Software (PC/TCP).

Can PC/TCP be loaded on an ISDN card ? If so, what card ? How ? 
What does it cost ? What version of PC/TCP ? Does anyone have experience
with this ? Questions, question, questions...

Any comment would be helpfull.

Marc Kelchtermans
E-mail Administrator

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marc Kelchtermans   Internet: make@bsoisf.atr.bso.nl
                    X.400   : C=NL;A=400NET;P=BSO ORIGIN;O=BSO/NEDERLAND BV
                              OU1=ORIGIN/ISF;I=MJH;S=Kelchtermans;G=Marc

-----------[000231][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 13:38:35 GMT
From:      robs@goofy (rob spencer)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP extensions

Can anyone out there suggest which workstations implement RFC1323
which includes extended TCP window sizes and selective
retransmissions.

I know that SUN and HP do not.

Thanks

Rob

-----------[000232][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 14:18:11 GMT
From:      adula@technet.sg (Chiu Jia Yu)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   What is the Performance for nfs/socket/rpc ?


What is the performance of the nfs/socket/rpc can I expect between
a client/server platform ?

Any experience is most welcome.

Chiu
email : adula@solomon.technet.sg

-----------[000233][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 14:32:47 GMT
From:      vnachtergaele@info.fundp.ac.be
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Sockets, ACK & UDP based reliable datagram library???



I'm working on a project developing a reliable message based
middleware library.  That is, applications communicate by sending
messages to each other.  The messages are relatively small (100 to
1000 bytes).  In a typical configuration, there will be one or two
servers (running about a dozen server processes), and around one
hundred workstations, each running a few (ten at most) client tasks.
The one hundred workstations are in ten different locations,
connected to the server LAN by ethernet bridges and 64 k bit leased
lines.  It should not matter, but these are all IBM RS6000's.

There are two main issues that remain to be addressed:

1- how to absolutely guarantee message delivery,

2- how to notice within one second that the network (or a server)
   has gone down.

At first, we thought TCP-IP is there just for this.

However, we've learned that a successful write to a socket only
guarantees that the message has been passed to the lower network
layers (on the sending host), while we need confirmation that the
message has arrived on the destination host.  Can this be done
with TCP, without an application level acknowledgment?  If not,
we'd rather use UDP: it's simpler and should be more performant.

Then, a socket read or write may fail, indicating a network
problem, but we really need something else: when the network goes
down, we want TCP to tell us (with a signal, or any other UNIX
means).  That should happen in a fraction of a second.
What is not clear is whether the keepalive function could be used
for that.  It seems like that's precisely the function of keepalives.
However, I haven't found any useful information on this in my UNIX
and TCP-IP manuals.  The default keepalive value of two hours is
something we cannot understand the meaning of.



So it would seem TCP cannot help us here, we'll have to write our own
UDP based library, with timers, retransmissions, etc.
That doesn't frighten us (to the contrary, it seems like a fun project).

Could some knowledgeable people confirm this analysis?  Or point me
to relevant documents?

Last question: would we be reinventing the wheel, is there a public
domain version of such a UDP based reliable datagram library?

  Thanks,

                        Arthur Tommelein



 Email: ato@cimad.be
 Cimad Consultants, Groenenborgerlaan 16, 2610 Antwerp, Belgium

 I'm using a friend's account to post this, but I should be reading this
 newsgroup regularly.  Please send email to my own account: ato@cimad.be.


------------------------------------------------------------
 Arthur Tommelein     Internet: Arthur.Tommelein@Cimad.Be
 Cimad Consultants, Groenenborgerlaan 16, 2610 Antwerpen
  Tel: +32 3 829 32 32    Fax: +32 3 829 32 33
------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000234][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 23:04:02 -0500
From:      rdippold@qualcomm.com (Ron "Asbestos" Dippold)
To:        news.announce.newgroups,news.groups,comp.client-server,comp.os.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.os2.networking.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.osf.misc,comp.unix.osf.osf1
Subject:   RESULT: comp.soft-sys.dce passes 317:22

				RESULT
	  unmoderated group comp.soft-sys.dce passes 317:22

There were 317 YES votes and 22 NO votes, for a total of 339 valid votes. 
There was 1 abstain.

For group passage, YES votes must be at least 2/3 of all valid (YES and NO)
votes.   There also must be at least 100 more YES votes than NO votes. 

There is a five day discussion period after these results are posted.  If no
serious allegations of voting irregularities are raised, the moderator of
news.announce.newgroups will create the group shortly thereafter.


Newsgroups line:
comp.soft-sys.dce       The Distributed Computing Environment (DCE).

This vote is being conducted by a neutral third party.  For voting
questions only contact rdippold@qualcomm.com.  For questions about the
proposed group contact Craig Weeks <weeks@dss1.austin.ibm.com>


CHARTER

The newsgroup comp.soft-sys.dce is intended for discussions of any and
all DCE implementations and applications across all hardware platforms
and operating system.  The topics to be discussed include (but are not
limited to) the following:

   - Porting DCE applications between platforms
   - Configuring DCE cells
   - Installation of DCE
   - DCE performance
   - Network transport questions
   - Suggestions for future enhancements
   - Success Stories
   - Application development tools


HOW TO VOTE

Send MAIL to:   voting@qualcomm.com
Just Replying should work if you are not reading this on a mailing list.

Your mail message should contain one of the following statements:
      I vote YES on comp.soft-sys.dce
      I vote NO on comp.soft-sys.dce

You may also ABSTAIN in place of YES/NO - this will not affect the outcome.
Anything else may be rejected by the automatic vote counting program.  The
votetaker will respond to your received ballots with a personal acknowledge-
ment by mail - if you do not receive one within several days, try again.
It's your responsibility to make sure your vote is registered correctly.

One vote counted per person, no more than one per account. Addresses and
votes of all voters will be published in the final voting results list.


comp.soft-sys.dce Final Vote Ack

Voted Yes
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
73314.1314@CompuServe.COM                                             S. Leach
94CHALLA@wmich.edu                                                            
a11389@mindlink.bc.ca                                              Muiz Motani
Abhijit_Khale@transarc.com                                                    
achter@informatik.uni-muenchen.de                                  Sven Achter
acline@sybase.com                                                  Allan Cline
adams@feds.Kodak.COM                                            ADAMS at Solar
adickma@lookout.ecte.uswc.uswest.com                           Alan L. Dickman
andrean@sco.COM                                                               
Anthony.Walwyn@telematics.com                                   Anthony Walwyn
ARAMIS@ACS.TAMU.EDU                                              Neil Burleson
arndt@magenta.Ico.Olivetti.Com                                                
arons@ece.ucdavis.edu                                                Tom Arons
ault@cs.albany.edu                                                    Jim Ault
beal@owgmail.endicott.ibm.com                                                 
beattyje@tyrell.net                                                John Beatty
berndw@VAX2.CSTP.UMKC.EDU                                   Bernd Weidenmuller
bfc@world.std.com                                              brandon f chubb
bianco@MiSTy.larc.nasa.gov                                     David J. Bianco
bill@osf.org                                                        Bill Masek
birchall@pilot.njin.net                                           Dan Birchall
BJanosch@stgl.sel.alcatel.de         Bernd Janosch VS/EDCB3 Tel. 1196 od. 7355
blarsen@statoil.no                                           Bjorn Hell Larsen
bob@wuerl.WUstl.EDU                                             Robert Whitman
bobs@hal.com                                                    Bob Schaugaard
bonnetf@bart.esiee.fr                                             Frank Bonnet
brennan@hal.hahnemann.edu                    Andrew Brennan, Programming Bween
bschult@uhc.com                                                   Brad Schultz
c.taylor@smtplink.az05.bull.com                                       Taylor.C
cambria@smaug.enet.dec.com          Michael C. Cambria  02-Nov-1994 1022 -0500
CCADDA@beluga.upe.ac.za                                         Daryl Anderson
chcampb@indss1.ecte.uswc.uswest.com                             Cliff Campbell
choang@tdkt.skypoint.net                                            Carl Hoang
chris@snrc.uow.edu.au                                             Chris Stacey
chrisdu@sco.COM                                             Christopher Durham
chrism%nmx701.UUCP                                               Chris Malicki
Christian.Finger@rz.uni-karlsruhe.de                                          
ckk@uchicago.edu                                             Chris Koenigsberg
clay@lworks.com                                                      Clay Boyd
coetmeur@icdc.icdc.fr                                                         
colinm@sybase.com                                                 Colin Morris
cornej%kernel.dnet.dec.com@decuk.uvo.dec.com    John Corne - 833 3305  20-Oct-
csb@ullman.elte.hu                                            Csizmazia Balazs
ct@broadcom.ie                                                  Ciaran Treanor
czeranski@informatik.tu-clausthal.de                           Joerg Czeranski
dacey@crl.com                                                   Peter Campbell
dave@gcs.co.nz                                                   David Carmine
dave_reynolds@MENTORG.COM                                        Dave Reynolds
dcw@WLV.IIPO.GTEGSC.COM                                      David C. Woodruff
de@enterprise.DHZB.DE                                               Dirk Emmel
detloff@nikki.CCIT.Arizona.EDU                                    John Detloff
dhartung@mcs.com                                             Daniel A. Hartung
dhd@citi.umich.edu                                                Dave Detlefs
dhs@chloe.cs.wayne.edu                                                        
dmccart@gomez.sc.intel.com                                     Doug McCarthy ~
Doug.Hartman@charon.citicorp.com                                  Doug Hartman
dpo@itd.dsto.gov.au                                               Damian O'Dea
dproland@sybase.com                                               David Roland
DSW@albert.mit.edu                 David Woodruff, MIT Lab for Nuclear Science
duggan@clear.co.nz                                                  Tim Duggan
dwc@soac.bellcore.com                                             David Carman
DWIGHT@UCSBVM.UCSB.EDU                                        Dwight M. McCann
eburger@mason1.gmu.edu                                           Eric W Burger
ece_0469@bigdog.engr.arizona.edu                                          andi
eckert@fokus.gmd.de                                              K.-P." Eckert
ed.smith@midrangecomp.com                                                     
ed@drax.gsfc.nasa.gov                                                Ed Stokes
edb@tpocc.gsfc.nasa.gov                                               Ed Beach
efeustel@ida.org                                                Edward Feustel
eggert@twinsun.com                                                 Paul Eggert
eiji@netmarket.com                                                  Eiji Hirai
eliot@siac.com                                                 Eliot M Solomon
emrgtech@pcnet.com                                                            
ems@halcyon.com                                                   Erik Seaberg
enurmi@ncsmsg01tr.ntc.nokia.com                                      Nurmi Esa
evangild@s850.mwc.edu                                           erik vangilder
eyala@applicom.co.il                                             Eyal Allalouf
ezras@sco.COM                                                   Ezra Steinberg
felder@atc.co.at                                                 Felder Stefan
Felix.Hallmann@bln.sel.alcatel.de                               Felix Hallmann
fenzlj@infinet.com                                               John A. Fenzl
ferina@to.sem.it                                                 Davide Ferina
FGSchulz@engprn.mobil.com                                          Fred Schulz
Francis.Dupont@inria.fr                                         Francis Dupont
fred-neasham@NS.Arizona.EDU                                                   
fsspr@camelot.acf-lab.alaska.edu                                  Sean P. Ryan
gabi@santix.de                                                    Gabi Lemberg
ganeshb@cs.tamu.edu                                        Ganesha R Beedubail
gbase@lindy.stanford.edu                                      Portfolio gopher
gchung@openhorizon.com                                            George Chung
gds@FICUS.CS.UCLA.EDU                                             Greg Skinner
gendalia@buchanan07.res.iastate.edu                             T. J. Di Marco
Geoff.Horn@gf.barclays.co.uk                                        Geoff Horn
gio@DI.UniPi.IT                                                               
Giovanni.Martini@cselt.stet.it                                                
glaser@eos.its.op.dlr.de                                      Christian Glaser
gleason@bobcat.az05.bull.com                                     David Gleason
goldberg_ilya@jpmorgan.com                                       Ilya Goldberg
goliath!johnd@st-james.comp.vuw.ac.nz                                         
gpower@cmi.on.ca                                                   Gerry Power
Gregory_Brail@transarc.com                                                    
gwa1@bluecross.on.ca                                               Greg Walker
gwb@umd5.umd.edu                                                  George Baltz
Hal.Lockhart@onsett.com                                           Hal Lockhart
harter@sonic.nmti.com                                               ron harter
heilbron@informatik.uni-muenchen.de                        Stephen Heilbronner
Herbert.Hotz@alcatel.ch                                           Herbert Hotz
HERWIG@urz1.rz.uni-leipzig.de                                   Wolfram Herwig
hethmon@APAC12.AG.UTK.EDU                                                     
hh@hhdo.ping.de                                          Henning Holtschneider
hideaki@hydra.cray.com                                        Hideaki Moriyama
hlee@austin.ibm.com                                                  Henry Lee
honey@citi.umich.edu                                            peter honeyman
hrz040@aixrs1.hrz.uni-essen.de                                       Dr. Brett
hsn@linus.instrumental.com                                        Henry Newman
isoft!uunet!isoft!jec@uunet.uu.net                            Jonathan Chinitz
iv@sco.COM                                                     John Elliott IV
J.Pelan@Queens-Belfast.ac.uk                                          J. Pelan
jacob@tmfs.mpgfk.tu-dresden.de                                      Dirk Jacob
jad@nsa.hp.com                                                     John Dilley
jaffe@applicom.co.il                                              Elliot Jaffe
jaisimha@atrium.com                                         Jaisimha Muthegere
james_stansell@wiltel.com                                       James Stansell
jamison@opndce.enet.dec.com                                   21-Oct-1994 1223
Jan.Djarv@sa.erisoft.se                                              Jan Djarv
japi@finland.hp.com                                              Jari Pirhonen
jdt@voodoo.ca.boeing.com                                         Jim Tomlinson
JEFF@MITVMA.MIT.EDU                                            Jeff Harrington
jeffr@sco.COM                                                                 
jhcaldwell@amoco.com                                          John H. Caldwell
jim@belv.com                                                       Jim Kimball
jimh@u.washington.edu                                                Jim Hogan
Jim_Mann@transarc.com                                                         
JLF@PSUVM.PSU.EDU                                     Jim Forkner 814-865-4775
jmclaugh@infinet.com                                           John McLaughlin
joanne@Sakai.jpl.nasa.gov                                       Joanne Shimada
joc@netaxs.com                                                                
john@kinexis.com                                                 John Tibbetts
johng@belv.com                                                    John Griffin
Jon.Giltner@Colorado.EDU                                           Jon Giltner
jones@bakmes.Colorado.EDU                                     Richard A. Jones
Jose.Valverde@ebi.ac.uk                                  J. R. Valverde (4423)
jpimentel@nectech.com                                                         
jroberts@clipr.colorado.edu                                        Jon Roberts
jsimpson@fsp.fsp.com                                           John R. Simpson
jt@cs.brown.edu                                                  Julian Thomas
jxn@netcom.com                                                      Jerry Neal
K.Moayed@frcl.bull.fr                                            Kamran Moayed
k150471@proffa.cc.tut.fi                                       Kniivil{ Jarkko
kadams@relay.nswc.navy.mil                                                    
kaindl@aixcip08.Math.uni-augsburg.de                          Christian Kaindl
keithr@sco.COM                                                  Keith Reynolds
kelly@opndce.enet.dec.com    Carol Kelly, OpenVMS DCE 381-0270  21-Oct-1994 13
kkokal@uhc.com                                                     Kevin Kokal
kl2@helix.nih.gov                                              Robert P. Klein
Kmcdonal@aol.com                                                              
Kovacs@informatik.uni-stuttgart.de                                Ernoe Kovacs
kpayne@redwood.hac.com                                             Kevin Payne
kpickens@unicomp.net                                             Keith Pickens
kreierla@hccompare.com                                    Larry Kreier (x5294)
kremer@cs.utwente.nl                                              Harro Kremer
krishna@meaddata.com                                      Krishna Devabhaktuni
kugler_s@WIZARD.COLORADO.EDU                                      Susan Kugler
KURTDAHM@aol.com                                                              
Kwaku.Frimpong-Ansah@aut.alcatel.at                       Kwaku Frimpong-Ansah
kwc@citi.umich.edu                                               Kevin Coffman
kyokopy@sig.ops.toyosu.unisys.co.jp                             Kyoko Yamauchi
L15D@ZFN.UNI-BREMEN.DE                                        Martin Schroeder
Laurent.Vallee@der.edf.fr    Laurent Vallee - IMA/ICI/ASR - stagiaire EPITA - 
leimeng@caip.rutgers.edu                                               Leimeng
Linda.Drake@Colorado.EDU                                           Linda Drake
linimon@lonesome.com                                              Mark Linimon
lmb@barra.csb.ki.se                                               Leif Bergman
lord@topaz.kiev.ua                                                Vadim Zaliva
lynch@cleo.bc.edu                                           Jaqueline A. Lynch
l_lechelle@effix.effix.fr                                     LECHELLE Laurent
mac@unison.com                                                 Michael Casteel
maciag@orange.digex.net                                         Michael Maciag
manningc@nz.dialogic.com                                       Charles Manning
markb@falcon.teleride.on.ca                                         Mark Baker
markc@citi.umich.edu                                               Mark Carter
markv@hpwadec.wal.hp.com                                       Mark Vantzelfde
masato@access.digex.net                                           J M Thompson
mati@psti.com                                                       Mati Sauks
mauney@jtec.mauney.com                                              Jon Mauney
mbm@dsbc.icl.co.uk                                          Malcolm Mladenovic
mbrowder@sco.COM                                                  Mike Browder
mdanley@next3.corp.mot.com                                         Mike Danley
mesches@refuge.Colorado.EDU                                      Scott Mesches
mfu@gradient.com                                                       Ming Fu
mfvl@xs4all.nl                                                Michiel van Loon
mg@ac.duke.edu                                                   Michael Grubb
mike@seb.se                                                      Michael Evans
miket@world.std.com                                          Michael Trachtman
miles@eskimo.com                                                   Miles Bader
monical@walnut.csp.mmc.com                                      Robert Monical
morrison@star.enet.dec.com                Wayne Morrison, ZK03-4/X09, 381-0757
moscar@orion.ico.olivetti.com                                   Raffaele Mosca
mtimm@auk.uwaterloo.ca                                        Martin Timmerman
multitec@insosf1.infonet.net                                                  
murphy@dco.dec.com                                                 Rick Murphy
mverboven@dow.com                                                Marc Verboven
N.Winton@axion.bt.co.uk                                            Neil Winton
n9682138@sparc1.cc.ncku.edu.tw                                                
nat@netcom.com                                                 Nathaniel Stitt
neil_r@gradient.com                                                       neil
neumair@informatik.uni-muenchen.de                            Bernhard Neumair
nhijazi@ix.netcom.com                                             nabil hijazi
novak@pt4427.pto.ford.com                                       Louis M. Novak
nzaldast@openhorizon.com                                       Nick Zaldastani
overlord@access.digex.net                                            David Coe
pacheco@gtenet.com                                              Andres Pacheco
patelk@basf-corp.com                                             Kalpesh Patel
Pat_Stephenson@transarc.com                                                   
pearceh@rcscl1.dnet.bp.com    Huw Pearce, SEMA/BP Exploration, Sunbury-on-Tham
pefv700@hpcf.cc.utexas.edu                                Christopher Phillips
peterson@csc.ti.com                                               Bob Peterson
Philipp.Hoschka@sophia.inria.fr                                Philipp Hoschka
pio@ncrsecp.copenhagen.NCR.COM                                        Per Igel
pkalapa@maxm.com                                                              
pkarger@gte.com                                                 Paul A. Karger
pm@fct.unl.pt                                                   Pedro Medeiros
pp000146@interramp.com                                   Carol & Peter Jobusch
PRMADER@lmsmgr.lerc.nasa.gov                                                  
probert@uhc.com                                                   Paul Roberts
pschow@advtech.uswest.com                                          Peter Schow
pshuang@MIT.EDU                                                               
R.Germain@frcl.bull.fr                                           Roger GERMAIN
Raimund.Moedl@zfe.siemens.de                                     Raimund Moedl
rajeeva@sco.COM                                                   Rajeev Arora
rane@cs.tut.fi                                                   M{kinen Rauno
ranous@nsa.hp.com                                                  Alex Ranous
rb@isise.rl.ac.uk                                    Richard Brodie, RAL x6245
reinhard@santix.de                                               Reinhard Jahn
rfh@xaos.ml.com                                                   Reilly Hayes
rheim@standard.com                                                  Randy Heim
richard@corixia.demon.co.uk                                     Richard Ashton
rick@bcm.tmc.edu                                             Richard H. Miller
RILEY.STEVE@tntv7.ntrs.com                         Steve D. Riley 312.630.1374
rkleitma@neumann.uwaterloo.ca                                      Rob Leitman
rmishra@VNET.IBM.COM                                                          
robi@xsft6.ico.olivetti.com                                  Roberto Invernici
robin@paros.com                                                  Robin Cutshaw
rogerv@sco.COM                                                                
Roland.Ziegler@dlr.de                                                         
Rolf.Kozlowski@informatik.tu-muenchen.de                        Rolf Kozlowski
ron@vwier.xs4all.nl                                               Ron van Wier
rossi@medoc.cica.fr                                                Bruno ROSSI
rossmac@hookup.net                                           Ross MacGillivray
rpwhite@espresso.rt.cs.boeing.com                   Roger White (206) 865-4343
rsalz@osf.org                                                        Rich Salz
rufinus@cae.wisc.edu                                                          
rwilkie@ch.hp.com                                                  Rich Wilkie
ryan@odouls.stx.com                                            patrick m. ryan
S.BOUCH@HQL2UB.boat.bt.com                                         BOUCH STEVE
sailer@a4430edc.esr.hp.com                                          Lee Sailer
Saint@phoebus.cs.ncku.edu.tw                                                  
sammut@dstc.qut.edu.au                                           Andrew Sammut
sarr@umich.edu                                                    Sarr Blumson
schrei@aurora.kapsch.co.at                                     Ralf Schreivogl
seebode@fokus.uke.uni-hamburg.de                                              
sfine@sirius.bony.com                                             Spencer Fine
sherry@it.teithe.gr                                     Sherry Erasmus Student
shimizu@ssaws.yk.fujitsu.co.jp                                 SHIMIZU Hiroshi
shrdlu@willow.sdd.trw.com                                        Lynda L. True
simon@lia.di.epfl.ch                                              Simon Leinen
SIMONSC@RCWUSR.BP.COM                                                         
sisene@edinfor.pt                                                   Pedro Enes
SMARTIN@uhc.com                                           Stephen J. Martineau
someone@boocock.demon.co.uk                                     Internet Relay
SPB@tntv8.ntrs.com                                                Steve Bonine
spee001@telecom.ptt.nl                                         Jan Willem Spee
spike@hal.com                                                      Spike White
strange@zk3.dec.com                                          Steve Strange USG
swcxt@boco.co.gov                                                 Shane Castle
swgate2!finmail1!WC6693@rutgers.edu                                           
sxc@itd.dsto.gov.au                                            Stephen Crawley
tatsu_s@ch.hp.com                                                             
tburch@typhoon.ca.boeing.com                                       Terry Burch
Tdahm@aol.com                                                                 
thompson@maya.com                                                Dean Thompson
thsscch@iitmax.acc.iit.edu                                              [HuCC]
todd_gamble@wiltel.com                                             Todd Gamble
tonypuah@werple.apana.org.au                                         Tony Puah
tracy@carlc.demon.co.uk                                           Tracy Howard
treadway@sco.COM                                              Richard Treadway
trey@netcom.com                                                  Trey Thompson
Tu0usc@aol.com                                                                
twarren@HK.Super.NET                                         Mr Tim J M Warren
Uwe.Graichen@bln.sel.alcatel.de                                    U. Graichen
vanrooy@austin.asc.slb.com                                                    
vince@tii.com                                               Vincent Dovydaitis
vinces@sco.COM                                                  Vince Seavello
Vinod.Jessani@SanDiego.NCR.COM                                   Vinod Jessani
walid@jade.spctrm.com                                              Walid Danaf
wdi@ztivax.zfe.siemens.de                                      Werner Dittmann
weeks@dss1.austin.ibm.com                                          Craig Weeks
wei_hu@adlman.engr.sgi.com                                              Wei Hu
whalenm@tis.telos.com                                     Matthew V. J. Whalen
whartman@VNET.IBM.COM                                                         
whudace@bgsuvax.bgsu.edu                                          Bill Hudacek
wiljo@cls.net                                                     Wiljo Heinen
win@e3101u01.atl.hp.com                                         Win Strickland
winkler@freia.inf.tu-dresden.de                               Matthias Winkler
wjadkin@srv.PacBell.COM                                          Winona Adkins
wookie@wookie.demon.co.uk                                       John Beardmore
wright@hi.com                                                     David Wright
wunder@nosferatu.hpl.hp.com                                   Walter Underwood
WVISCRC@WVNVM.WVNET.EDU                                                       
wysocki@datalife.com                                             Chris Wysocki
yadallee@Gallif.Ersys.Edmonton.Ab.cA                     Dave Shariff Yadallee
yefim@magna.com                                                 Yefim V. Natis
ymyong@neumann.uwaterloo.ca                                      Yuh Ming YONG
Yolande.Berbers@CS.kuleuven.ac.be                              Yolande Berbers
yshuang@es.ncku.edu.tw                                          Huang Yi-Sheng
Yves.Mahe@iacorp.fr                                                  Yves MAHE
Zahn@uni-augsburg.de                                               Markus Zahn

Voted No
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
bediger@csn.org                                                   Bruce Ediger
catseye@netcom.com                                              Mark Kupferman
crouchkp@flidh103.delcoelect.com                              Kenneth P Crouch
csnook@world.std.com                                              carl e snook
cward@Think.COM                                               Christopher Ward
ewl@panix.com                                                   Emery Lapinski
gt5139c@prism.gatech.edu                                       Peter L. Thomas
iwj10@cus.cam.ac.uk                                                Ian Jackson
jgoddard@rd.qms.com                                                Jim Goddard
jlitvin@SSD.intel.com                                              John Litvin
jsk591@lulu.acns.nwu.edu                                                      
lvirden@cas.org                                                Larry W. Virden
Mark-Moraes@deshaw.com                                                        
otto@vaxb.acs.unt.edu                                                  M. Otto
radrayer@panix.com                                              Rebecca Drayer
rew@moontarz.nuance.com                                           Ryan Waldron
roberson@hamer.ibd.nrc.ca                                      Walter Roberson
shaunc@faceplant.gvg.TEK.COM                                         Lou Marsh
sledge@hammer.oche.de                                        Thomas Bueschgens
srogers@tps.mcs.eds.com                                           Steve Rogers
stainles@bga.com                                                  Dwight Brown
tgm@netcom.com                                            Thomas G. McWilliams

Abstained
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
mmt@RedBrick.COM                                          M Mike Taksar KC6ZPS

-----------[000235][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 04:13:37 -0800
From:      cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

Peter L. Beaty (beaty@acsu.buffalo.edu) wrote:
: In article <39pc1f$9d1@noao.edu>, W. Richard Stevens <rstevens@noao.edu> wrote:
: >> Is there anyone out there knowing what is the maximum message size of the 
: >> system call of sento and recvfrom. I tried in SunOS4.1 and got maximum
: >> size is 9000 bytes, but I would like to know what kind of  parameter affects
: >> this number. In UDP protocol, the maximum size of a UDP datagram is 64k
: >> bytes. How to write a program so that I can use the maximum datagram
: >> size. Thanks in advance!
: >
: >You need a setsockopt() for the SO_SNDBUF socket option.  Older BSD-derived
: >systems may not let you really send a full-sized UDP datagram.
: >
: >	Rich Stevens
: I've got a similar problem, however I believe the problem is on the receiving
: end.  I'm using recv, have set the SO_SNDBUF and SO_RCVBUF on both ends to
: 16384 bytes, but the maximum message size I can receive at once is 8192 bytes.
: If I send anything longer, it receives the message as two different blocks.  

I hope you're not using UDP which must preserv packet boundaries!  You are
probably useing TCP/IP (SOCK_STREAM), which is just a stream of bytes.  A
write of 1000 bytes can in theory be read()/recvfrom()/getmsg() in 1-->1000
byte chunks... NEVER depend on your SOCK_STREAM reads reading anything
more than 1 byte at a time.  This means you need a packet envelop with
a byte count etc to denote packet sizes and packet boundaries implemented
at the application layer...

Good luck.


-----------[000236][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 1994 15:34:22 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP/IP performance software?

In article <39rmq6$8l2@news.CCIT.Arizona.EDU> Leonard@Arizona.EDU writes:
>
>In article <39qobi$crv@marble.Britain.EU.net>, mfw@warburg (Mark White) writes:
>|
>|Does any-one know of a TCP/IP network performance benchmark suite that 
>|runs on Sun 4.1.3 and Solaris 2.0 machines? I have an HP net-perf suite, 
>|but it does not build on our Sun machines.  
>|
>|We are looking to do performance tests for Sun 
>|based clients connecting to servers on both Ethernet and FDDI in various 
>|configurations.  The sort of thing I am looking for is the ability to do file
>|transfers with different packet sizes and measure the throughput.
>
>I sure like the tptest program, which slams data at a target
>node's TCP DISCARD port.  Unlike TTCP (which you also ought
>to check out), it doesn't require code installation on both
>sides, as most (or many) TCPs implement and enable the DISCARD
>port by default.
>
>You can find it as part of JvNC's NOCOL package:
>/pub/jvncnet-packages/nocol on ftp.jnvc.net.
> ...

Some of my early efforts at TCP benchmarks involved the discard and echo
ports.  In my estimation, that approach has a fatal flaw.  The discard
port is implemented on a large number of systems (perhaps the majority)
by an "internal" service of the `inetd` daemon.  If your TCP or UDP
application is a lot like inetd, then blasting at the discard port is
a good idea.  However, most TCP applications are very different from
inetd.

As I recall, I vastly improved the apparent performance of the systems
I cared about by modest changes to inetd, which should give you a clue
about how much attention to pay to results based on the echo or discard
ports.  (I think those changes have long since been removed from that
product, because they only complicated the maintenance of inetd without
contributing to its purpose.)


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000237][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 15:49:29 GMT
From:      icccdk@inet.uni-c.dk (Lars Larsen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   HELP: references for TCP/IP on WAN ?

Hello anyone..
I need a reference of how to run TCP/IP directly on a
dedicated TCP/IP WAN. Does anything of that kind exist ?? 

Please return answers to my mail box:
icccdk@inet.uni-c.dk
Thank you

Lars 
ICCC A/S Denmark

-----------[000238][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 16:21:25 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

>: You need a setsockopt() for the SO_SNDBUF socket option.  Older BSD-derived
>: systems may not let you really send a full-sized UDP datagram.
>
> Is the SO_SNDBUF/SO_RCVBUF options setting the "single packet" max sizes
> receivable or a queue size that may hold many smaller packets for safe
> keeping prior to readin??

For BSD-derived implementations, the send buffer size is essentially the
maximum size of a UDP datagram that you can send, since there's no queueing
done on output, until the IP packets reach the outgoing interface queue.

But on the receiving side the size of the receive buffer is indeed the
total size of all queued datagrams (and their 16-byte sockaddr_in's with
the source address) for that socket.

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000239][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 1994 17:01:59 GMT
From:      manish@netcom.com (Manish Rai)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   FTP on AIX, VMS, WINDOWS

1) Have ws_ftp installed. When I try ftp to a VMS box I get connections refuses.
   I can connect to a AIX box and connect to the AIX box form VMS box.
2) I recentry updraged AIX to version 3.2.5.  If can ftp to if but when I try
   and run ftp on it I get following message.
	"Could not load program ftp"
	"Symbol same_host in ksh undefined"
	"Error was: Exec format error"

Please reply to manish@netcom.com
Thanx in advance.

Manish Rai


-----------[000240][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 17:26:52 GMT
From:      raj@cup.hp.com (Rick Jones)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP extensions

rob spencer (robs@goofy) wrote:
             ^^^^^^^^^^
[might want to see what is preventing your full email address from
being put here...]

: I know that SUN and HP do not.

Yes and No for HP. Stock HP-UX 9.X TCP does not support RFC1323. The
RFC 1323 extensions are shipped with the 9.X EISA Fibre Channel
software, which one gets when ordering the EISA Fibre Channel card.

Of course, there's also the standard "in the next major release"
answer...but that does not do much for today.

rick jones

-----------[000241][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 1994 17:40:09 GMT
From:      stevehi@microsoft.com (Steve Hiskey)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.protocols.smb,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Accessing LAN Manager resources through a router


Can you ping the resource?  If you can ping it, you should be able to 
add the resource to your lmhosts file. There exists a "proxy" hack internally
called the mailslot router (I think the docs call it something like TCPIP services
for WANs or something) which will proxy reply your local arp.
Do a ping to verify and then play with the ADDNAME command to add the netbios to ip 
mapping, if that works, add it to your lmhost.

Arps are always local, because they are broadcasts... 

Steve

| 
| Hi,
| 
| My PC is uses Microsoft Lan Manager (2.2 I think) to access resources
| on a HP-9000 server using LMU. Now I came accros the need of accessing other
| resources on a similar server that is on a different subnet separated
| by a router (also HP). I have tried configuring my lmhosts, hosts files
| but with no result.
| 
| Using tcpdump I managed to look at what my PC sends out and discovered
| that it will always does a broadcast on the subnetwork it's on instead
| of using the address of the server on the other side of the network.
| 
| I called HP support and they told me that this is how Lan Manager is 
| supposed to work. So how can I use something on the other side of the
| router wall?  Browsing through the manuals I saw there is a
| replication service, but I couldn't get my sysadm to try setting it up.
| 
| Any suggections?
| 
| Thanks in advance
 

-----------[000242][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 18:18:20 GMT
From:      skibo@florida.engr.sgi.com ()
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP extensions

In article <39t7or$4pf@pheidippides.axion.bt.co.uk>,
rob spencer <robs@goofy> wrote:
>Can anyone out there suggest which workstations implement RFC1323
>which includes extended TCP window sizes and selective
>retransmissions.
>
>I know that SUN and HP do not.
>
>Thanks
>
>Rob

Any Silicon Graphics machine running IRIX 5.0 or later has
the RFC 1323 extensions (extended TCP window sizes).

RFC 1323 does not specify selective acknowledgements and we have
not implemented them.


-- 
---
Thomas Skibo 				Networking Hardware Group
skibo@sgi.com				Silicon Graphics, Inc.

-----------[000243][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 18:27:01 GMT
From:      summit@ix.netcom.com (Summit '94)
To:        comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.lans.fddi,comp.dcom.lans.misc,comp.dcom.lans.token-ring.comp.dcom.servers,comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.sys.wellfleet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Enterprise Mangement Summit '94

Enterprise Management Summit 
Phone 415.512.0801 or  800-340-2111
Fax  415.512.1325
E-Mail  emiinc@mcimail.com

Summit '94 
November 14-18 

Summit '94 is right around the corner!

A Panel of Experts has been appointed for the Enterprise
Management Summit '94.  This panel will evaluate the vendor
shoot-out in the Enterprise Management Center, located on the
second floor of the Santa Clara Convention Center.  The panel
includes Warren Williams (Pacific Bell), Steve Waldbusser (Carnegie-Mellon), John McConnell (McConnell Consulting) and
Randy Smith (UPS).  The panel's evaluation will be made available at
the end of the conference.
Theater particpants include Computer Associates, Hewlett-Packard,
IBM, DEC,and Bull.

The Conference Starts Next Week!
Don't miss out on this exciting event!  Register today. 

 

-----------[000244][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 19:34:58 GMT
From:      geoffl@GS10.SP.CS.CMU.EDU (Geoff Langdale)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Wanted: Implementations of rfc1256 (Router Discovery) and IP in IP

Are there public or semi-public implementations of RFC1256 Router Discovery and 
the IP-in-IP protocol that someone could point me to? The standards are fairly
simple, but I don't really want to reinvent the wheel.

Thanks.

--
Geoff Langdale                 | "I also had a score to settle with
Grad Student                   |  talk.bizzare. I never forgot what
Carnegie Mellon University     |  they did to me" -Andy Beckwith


-----------[000245][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 19:43:50 GMT
From:      kirkwood@strider.fm.intel.com (Clayton Kirkwood)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   DHCP help!!

Hi, I am trying to find source for DHCP. I have seen various other requests recently
which didn't appear to be answered. I have also heard a rumor that the source
was pulled back because there was a "bug", but this seems unusual.

What is the status and where can I find the source. I am wanting to get it ported to
an NCR system running Unix.

Thanks,

-----------[000246][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 1994 20:50:25 GMT
From:      tyackel@baynetworks.com (Terry Yackel)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Chameleon TCP/IP and Novell Netware at the same time

Fellow networkers:

I am trying to get Chameleon Ver. 4.0 for Windows and Novell Netware to work together at
the same time on the network.  I have not been successful doing this.  Anyone
have a config.sys,autoexec.bat, net.cfg, system.ini, and win.ini that works? 

Thanks in advance, please respond via e-mail at tyackel@baynetworks.com

Terry Yackel

-----------[000247][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 1994 21:30:56 GMT
From:      keshav@research.att.com (srinivasan keshav <8773-40232> 0112720)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   ACM SIGCOMM'95 Call For Papers


                       Call  for  Papers
                               
                  ACM  SIGCOMM'95  CONFERENCE
                               
   Applications, Technologies, Architectures, and Protocols
                  for Computer Communication
                               
                 Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
                               
                August 30 to September 1, 1995
          (Tutorials and Workshop, August 28 and 29)
                               
   An  international forum on computer communication network
         applications and technologies, architectures,
                  protocols, and algorithms.
                               
SIGCOMM'95 seeks papers about significant contributions to the
broad field of computer and data communication networks.
Authors are invited to submit full papers concerned with both
theory and practice. Papers specifically focused on "higher-
layer" issues of network infrastructure, management, and
distributed application services are particularly encouraged.
The areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

*    Distributed application infrastructure paradigms;
  
*    Distributed common application services, middleware
     protocols;
  
*    Resource sharing, quality of service, multi-media
     networks;

*    Heterogeneous interworking, large scale networks;

*    Network management;

*    Important experimental results from operational networks;

*    High-speed networks, routing and addressing;

*    Wireless networking, support for mobile hosts;

*    Analysis and design of computer network architectures and
     algorithms; and
  
*    Protocol specification, verification, and analysis.
  
SIGCOMM'95 is a single-track, highly selective conference where
successful submissions typically report results firmly
substantiated by experiment, implementation, simulation, or
mathematical analysis.

The SIGCOMM'95 committee is planning both an excellent
technical program and related activities. In addition to the
presentation of papers and results, SIGCOMM'95 will offer
tutorials and workshops by noted instructors on the two days
preceding the actual conference.  We also plan an evening
session where speculative results and outrageous opinions can
be presented and discussed.

Papers must be less than 20 double-spaced pages long (formatted
for printing in the Proceedings, papers may not be longer than
12 pages), have an abstract of 100-150 words, and be original
material that has not been previously published nor is
currently under review by another conference or journal.

Important Dates:
          Paper submissions:            30 January 1995
          Tutorial/workshop proposals:  30 January 1995
          Notification of acceptance:   17 April 1995
          Camera ready papers due:      22 May 1995

All submitted papers will be judged based on their quality and
relevance through double-blind reviewing where the identities
of the authors are withheld from the reviewers.  Authors names
should not appear on the paper or in the postscript file for
electronic submissions.  A cover letter is required that
identifies the paper title and lists the name, affiliation,
telephone/fax numbers, and e-mail address of all authors.
Authors of accepted papers need to sign an ACM copyright
release form. The  Proceedings of the conference will be
published as a special issue of ACM SIGCOMM Computer
Communication Review.  The program committee may also select a
few papers for possible publication in the IEEE/ACM
Transactions on Networking.

Paper submissions should be sent to:
David Clark/Karen Sollins, Program Chairs at address below OR
electronic submissions to:  sc95@mercury.lcs.mit.edu

Five copies are required for paper submissions. Electronic
submissions (preferred) should be uuencoded, compressed
postscript.  Authors should separately e-mail the title, author
names and abstract of their paper to the program chairs and
identify any special equipment that will be required during its
presentation. Due to the high number of anticipated
submissions, authors are encouraged to strictly adhere to the
submission date.

SIGCOMM'95 will begin with two days of tutorials/workshops,
each of which is intended to cover a single topic in detail.
Proposals are solicited from individuals willing to give
tutorials, which may be either a half day (4 hours) or a full
day in length and cover topics at an introductory or advanced
level. Tutorial and workshop submissions should be made to the
Tutorial Chair noted below and include an extended abstract and
outline (2-4 pages), and an indication of length, objectives,
and intended audience.

Student Paper Award: Papers submitted by students will enter a
student-paper award contest.  Among the accepted papers, a
maximum of four outstanding papers will be awarded full
conference registration and a travel grant of $500 US dollars.
To be eligible the student must be the sole author of the
paper, or the first author and primary contributor.  A cover
letter must identify the paper as a candidate for this
competition.

General Chair:
Stuart Wecker
Symmetrix, Inc.
One Cranberry Hill
Lexington, MA 02173 U.S.A.
Ph: +1 617 862 3200
Fax: +1 508 443 8117
E-mail: wecker@symmetrix.com

Program Co-Chairs:
David Clark and Karen Sollins
M.I.T. Laboratory for Computer Science
545 Technology Square
Cambridge, MA 02139 U.S.A.
David Clark: +1 617 253 6003
Karen Sollins: +1 617 253 6006
Fax: +1 617 253 2673
E-mail: sc95pc@mercury.lcs.mit.edu

Treasurer:
Julio Escobar, BBN
Ph: +1 617 873 4579
jescobar@bbn.com

Publicity Chair:
S. Keshav, Bell Labs
Ph: +1 908 582 3384
E-mail: keshav@research.att.com

Tutorial Chair:
William Hawe, DEC
Ph: +1 508 486 7666
E-mail: hawe@lkg.dec.com

Registration Chair:
Liann DiMare, Mitre Corp.
Ph: +1 617 271 2567
E-mail: ldimare@mitre.org

Publications Chair:
Abhaya Asthana, Bell Labs
Ph: +1 908 582 6687
E-mail: abhaya@research.att.com

Program Committee:
Ian Akyildiz             Georgia Inst of Tech, USA
Ernst Biersack           Institut EURECOM, France
Jean-Chrysostome Bolot   INRIA, France
Lillian Cassel           Villanova Univ, USA
Lyman Chapin             BBN, USA
Jon Crowcroft            Univ College London, UK
Peter Danzig             USC, USA
Bruce Davie              Bellcore, USA
Stephen Deering          Xerox, USA
Gary Delp                IBM, USA
Deborah Estrin           USC, USA
Sally Floyd              LBL, USA
Paul Francis             NTT, Japan
Inder Gopal              IBM, USA
David Greaves            U of Cambridge, UK
Hemant Kanakia           AT&T, USA
Jim Kurose               U of Massachusetts, USA
Lawrence Landweber       U of Wisconsin, USA
Will Leland              Bellcore, USA
Larry Masinter           Xerox, USA
Derek McAuley            U of Cambridge, UK
David Mills              U of Delaware, USA
Jeffrey Mogul            DEC, USA
Gerald Neufeld           U of British Columbia, Can
Craig Partridge          BBN, USA
Joseph Pasquale          U of Cal, San Diego, USA
Krzystztof Pawlikowski   U of Canterbury, New Zealand
Larry Peterson           U of Arizona, USA
Stephen Pink             SICS, Sweden
Bernhard Plattner        ETH, Zurich, Switzerland
Michael Schwartz         U of Colorado, USA
Scott Shenker            Xerox, USA
Ellen Siegel             Xerox, USA
Jonathan Smith           U of Penn, USA
Martha Steenstrup        BBN, USA
James Sterbenz           GTE, USA
Jonathan Turner          Washington U, St. Louis, USA
Greg Watson              Hewlett Packard, USA
Lixia Zhang              Xerox, USA


-----------[000248][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 94 02:40:08 EST
From:      landmann@acs.bu.edu (Ron Gerald Landmann)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-
Subject:   Re: Winsock Application FAQ - Updated !

I did just that, but for the past couple of weeks, I keep on getting the 
following error:

HT Access: Error accessing
"http://www.ramp.com/~lcs/faqhtml.html":"SOCKET: Connection
has been refused"

Do you know wat the problem might be and how I could access this FAQ?
>The Winsock Application FAQ has been updated !  Look for continual 
 updates over the next week or so.  
>
>Point your WWW client at:
>
>http://www.ramp.com/~lcs/faqhtml.html


-----------[000249][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 1994 21:53:28 GMT
From:      beaty@acsu.buffalo.edu (Peter L. Beaty)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

In article <39pc1f$9d1@noao.edu>, W. Richard Stevens <rstevens@noao.edu> wrote:
>> Is there anyone out there knowing what is the maximum message size of the 
>> system call of sento and recvfrom. I tried in SunOS4.1 and got maximum
>> size is 9000 bytes, but I would like to know what kind of  parameter affects
>> this number. In UDP protocol, the maximum size of a UDP datagram is 64k
>> bytes. How to write a program so that I can use the maximum datagram
>> size. Thanks in advance!
>
>You need a setsockopt() for the SO_SNDBUF socket option.  Older BSD-derived
>systems may not let you really send a full-sized UDP datagram.
>
>	Rich Stevens
I've got a similar problem, however I believe the problem is on the receiving
end.  I'm using recv, have set the SO_SNDBUF and SO_RCVBUF on both ends to
16384 bytes, but the maximum message size I can receive at once is 8192 bytes.
If I send anything longer, it receives the message as two different blocks.  :(


-----------[000250][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 94 03:02:29 EST
From:      sean_shepard@mercury.spcc.com (Sean Shepard)
To:        comp.infosystems.www.providers,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Help! WinHTTPD w/socks to Netscape


I am getting "TCP Error"s in NetScape trying to access an
HTTPD server I am constructing on my Windows For Workgroups
machine.  I am using HTTPD 1.3pre, TCP-32, and Windows for
Workgroups on a Dell Pentium with a Cabletron 22 series 
ethernet board.  I tried switching to SERWEB to see
if the errors continue and they do.  It therefore appears
to be a problem with the TCP stack!??

I do not get the errors when accessing the server from 
MOSAIC on either my Mac or my NT machine.  Only when
using NetScape on the Mac (haven't tried PC Netscape).

I also do not get any errors accessing any other servers
including two others I've set-up on an NT machine and on
a NeXT.

Interestingly enough, everything comes accross okay despite
the error.  Once I click on "okay" if I click on the "images"
button on the toolbar then it paints the screen and gives
me another message box with "TCP ERROR" in it.  I click on that
and I'm okay.  The errors are kind of disrupting though! ;)

In doing some very high-level packet watching the only thing
I saw that was strange was that my PC would kick out a lot of
1,518 byte packets and the NeXT didn't send packets that large.
1,518 bytes is, of course, the maximum allowable by ethernet
but would that cause any problems for WWW services???


PLEASE HELP!?!?!  Mail me at sean_shepard@mercury.spcc.com


Sean C. Shepard                   #include <disclaimer.h>
Network/Telecommunications Mgr    <P><PRE>      
Shepard Poorman Communications    "Watch me as I dribble with
7301 North Woodland Drive          the rock, and then I make
Indianapolis, IN  46268            your jaw drop, as I stop and
sean_shepard@mercury.spcc.com      hit the last shot." W-N-E </PRE>

-----------[000251][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 10 Nov 1994 22:23:32 GMT
From:      N.Kaviani@massey.ac.nz (Nasser Kaviani)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   error ACMsetup caused a stack fault in module KRNL386.exed at 0001:1BB4

Hi all

I am trying to install winword6 and Excel 5 on a NFS network drive using 
Setup /a. After asking me about what directories you want to put the program 
and the msapps etc it goes and thinks for a while then comes with the 
following error message:

Error ACMsetup caused a stack fault in module KRNL386.exe at 0001:1bb4

I have tried different workstations, I have redone the installation of 
windows3.1 itself, but continuously get the same error message.

Does this ring any bells? 

Your help will be appreciated.

Please email me at N.Kaviani@massey.ac.nz

-----------[000252][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      10 Nov 94 22:41:28 GMT
From:      bob@rscsys.UUCP (Bob Celmer)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: VSAT network link experiences sought

In article <39m8c4$m9q@Jester.CC.MsState.Edu> fwp@CC.MsState.Edu writes:
>Hello,
>
>I'm interested in hearing from anyone familiar with VSAT network links.
>

 [ remainder of message deleted ]

>-- 
>Frank Peters  -  UNIX Systems Group Leader  -  Mississippi State University
>Internet: fwp@CC.MsState.Edu  -  Phone: 601-325-7030  -  FAX: 601-325-8921
>             WWW Home Page:  http://www.msstate.edu/~fwp/


Hello Frank -

I don't know whether this will reach you in time to be useful, but here
goes...  The company I work for currently has around 1000 sites connected
via TCP/IP over VSAT.  Our out-route has a maximum bandwidth of 512
Kbits/sec, and each in-route has a bandwidth of 128 Kbits/sec.  Performance
across that link can vary tremendously between TCP/IP implementations, and
between VSAT providers, but for us, ftp transfers typically run around 4
Kbytes / second inbound, and 8 Kbytes / second outbound.  Transfers which
require a double hop are constrained by the in-route, and will not go faster
than 4 Kbytes / second or so.  There are several constraints which must be
considered, but the principle ones are:
   1) buffer space provided by the earth station
   2) the intelligence in the TCP/IP software (many TCP/IP implementations
	  perform very poorly if running across anything other than ethernet)
   3) the number of simultaneous requests for bandwith on both the
	  in- and out-routes.

Our experience has shown that only between 50 and 60 percent utilization
of the theoretical bandwidth can be expected (total, sustained throughput).

Telnet performance is not great.  A propogation delay of 1.5 to 1.7
seconds can be expected per hop.  If you are directly connected to the
baseband equipment, your keystroke will be received by the remote site
and echoed back to you in approximately 1.5 seconds.  If you are one
remote site telnetting into another remote site, you will wait 3 seconds
or more to see your keystrokes returned to you.

I cannot give you any help with your IPX/SPX related questions, but I think
you can infer what you need from my comments above.  IPX does work across
VSAT, we simply do not use it.

Good Luck,
Bob.
-- 
UUCP: banana!core!rscsys!bob
 
Disclaimer:  I've never voted for Al Gore.

-----------[000253][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 01:05:20 GMT
From:      dstein@shell.portal.com (Doug Stein)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   HT Feed Other Domains?

I am attempting to answer some questions for my boss and hope someone can
point me in the proper direction.

If I have a host registered as a domain (assume home.com) being serviced by
a UUCP feed (ie I communicate with my service provider via a dial-up UUCP
connection), can I, in turn, feed someone else's domain (assume other.com)?
I assume that there is a way to do it, but what I really want to be able to
do is handle all administration for "private" domains at my site (host.com)
and not one level up (provider.com).  I've been reading through O'Reilly's
"DNS and BIND" book but still am not clear.

Restated:  I want users at other.com to be able to send email to the Internet
via home.com, which would then send to provider.com.  Conversely, I'd like
to be able to allow someone at a foreign site to send email to user@other.com
and know that it will eventually get to home.com for distribution to 
other.com.

Can this be done exclusively by the sysadmin at home.com?  Thanks in advance!
--
Doug Stein (dstein@shell.portal.com)	Voice: (408) 986-8704
Consolidated Business Systems, Inc.	Fax: (408) 986-0540

-----------[000254][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 01:26:57 GMT
From:      atkinson@sundance.itd.nrl.navy.mil (Ran Atkinson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: DHCP help!!

In article <39tt5m$akv@chnews.intel.com> kirkwood@strider.fm.intel.com (Clayton Kirkwood) writes:
>Hi, I am trying to find source for DHCP. I have seen various other requests 
>recently which didn't appear to be answered. I have also heard a rumor that 
>the source was pulled back because there was a "bug", but this seems unusual.

To my knowledge there is no freely distributable implementation of
DHCP.  If one does exist, I too would be interested in knowing of it.
There are freely distributable implementations of BOOTP which would be
a good basis for building a DHCP implementation.

WHO do you think has worked on a freely distributable DHCP implementation ?

Ran
atkinson@itd.nrl.navy.mil


-----------[000255][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 02:10:54 GMT
From:      mogul@pa.dec.com (Jeffrey Mogul)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP extensions

In article <39t7or$4pf@pheidippides.axion.bt.co.uk> robs@goofy (rob spencer) writes:
>Can anyone out there suggest which workstations implement RFC1323
>which includes extended TCP window sizes and selective
>retransmissions.

DEC OSF/1 fully supports the Window Scale option of RFC1323.
I don't know about the other features.

-Jeff



-----------[000256][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 04:30:19 GMT
From:      mgt421@mgt.kaist.ac.kr (MIS)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   routing

i want to know about OSPF protocol. Especially cost function.
Also, which network uses OSPF prortocol, and problem with using 
OSPF in practice. Please help me.

e-mail address hongkt@telmal.kaist.ac.kr


-----------[000257][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 1994 05:31:09 GMT
From:      davidi@deakin.edu.au (David Hadfield Ivens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   good/cheap winsock telnet wanted


We would like to test some telnets which use the trumpet winsock

Reasonably cheap site-licence is required

Must be able to re-map the function keys (F1-F20)

any recommendations and where I can download them from most welcome


thanks

davidi@deakin.edu.au


David H.Ivens,                                            Ph. 61 52 272508
Computing & Communications Services,                      Fax 61 52 272010
Deakin University,
Geelong, Victoria, Australia   3217             email:davidi@deakin.edu.au
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000258][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 05:34:57 GMT
From:      psampat@astro.ocis.temple.edu (Pragnesh Sampat)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Subnetting a Class C - confused

I am getting confused by the following two multihomed boxes:


  -----------------                     -----------------
 | 199,99,166.9    |      net1         | 199.99.166.12   |   
 | 255.255.255.192 |     --------      | 255.255.255.192 |   
 | 199.99.166.63   |                   | 199.99.166.63   |   
 |                 |                   |                 |   
 |                 |                   |                 |   
 | 199.99.166.193  |      net2         | 199.99.166.197  |   
 | 255.255.255.192 |    ---------      | 255.255.255.192 |   
 | 199.99.166.255  |                   | 199.99.166.255  |   
 |                 |                   |                 |   
 | osf/1 v2.0      |                   | SunOS 4.1.x     |   
  -----------------                     -----------------


1) Is the above a legal configuration?  (subnetting ok?)

2) From osf/1:

        % ping 199.99.166.12 should work?
        % ping 199.99.166.197 should work?
          (I believe both should work)

3) How about similar pings from the sunos?

(only net1 seems to work.  Have yet to swap the nets and see if it
make a
difference and check if it is routing or a net2 issue)

netstat -nr on both machines shows that there is a route to the
199.99.166.0 through interface 1 and 199.99.166.192 through the
interface
2. 

Any comments are welcome.  (I also welcome any comments on subnetting
guidelines on various unix boxes or related matters.)

Thanks for any info.

-Pragnesh

--
Pragnesh Sampat		psampat@astro.ocis.temple.edu		412 934 6626



-----------[000259][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 14:03:15 -0500
From:      esmith@access3.digex.net (Eric V. Smith)
To:        comp.sys.sequent,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Stevens' daemon_start() on Dynix

Sorry about the cross post.  This belongs in the Sequent
group, but I suspect anyone who knows the answer will
hang out in comp.protocols.tcp-ip.

I'm trying to write a daemon on a Sequent running Dynix/ptx
2.1.1.  It is my understanding that this is a SVR3 derivative.
I'm using the code from Stevens' "Unix Network Programming",
page 82 for his skeleton daemon.

I'm having problems getting this to work, in particular when
trying to disassociate from the controlling terminal and
process group. (setpgrp(), for example.  I can't find a .h
file or man page entry for this, but there is tcsetpgrp(),
which I'm not familiar with.)

Does anyone have this working?  I'll post a summary if I
find an answer.

Thanks.

Eric.

-----------[000260][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 05:56:26 GMT
From:      psampat@astro.ocis.temple.edu (Pragnesh Sampat)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Class C subnetting

I am getting confused by the following two multihomed boxes:


  -----------------                     -----------------
 | 199,99,166.9    |      net1         | 199.99.166.12   |   
 | 255.255.255.192 |     --------      | 255.255.255.192 |   
 | 199.99.166.63   |                   | 199.99.166.63   |   
 |                 |                   |                 |   
 |                 |                   |                 |   
 | 199.99.166.193  |      net2         | 199.99.166.197  |   
 | 255.255.255.192 |    ---------      | 255.255.255.192 |   
 | 199.99.166.255  |                   | 199.99.166.255  |   
 |                 |                   |                 |   
 | osf/1 v2.0      |                   | SunOS 4.1.x     |   
  -----------------                     -----------------


1) Is the above a legal configuration?  (subnetting ok?)

2) From osf/1:

        % ping 199.99.166.12 should work?
        % ping 199.99.166.197 should work?
          (I believe both should work)

3) How about similar pings from the sunos?

(only net1 seems to work.  Have yet to swap the nets and see if it
make a
difference and check if it is routing or a net2 issue)

netstat -nr on both machines shows that there is a route to the
199.99.166.0 through interface 1 and 199.99.166.192 through the
interface
2. 

Any comments are welcome.  (I also welcome any comments on subnetting
guidelines on various unix boxes or related matters.)

Thanks for any info.

-Pragnesh




-----------[000261][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 16:12:02 -0600
From:      les@MCS.COM (Leslie Mikesell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.os.ms-windows.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.setup,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,connect.audit
Subject:   Re: Can MS-Windows(3.11) use TCP/IP as THE ONLY transport protocol?

In article <Cz4900.64D@ibmpcug.co.uk>, Ken Tough <object@ibmpcug.co.uk> wrote:
>I would like to know if it is possible to use TCP/IP for the 
>"default ms-windows protocol" i.e) as the standard transport over which 
>all ms-windows communications takes place.  (For example, picture a
>network of WfWg machines where the only Ethernet packets are IP ones.

Sure.  The only problem you might hit is that you can't use the 32bit
MS tcp stack without having windows running.  The 16bit stack will
let you do a NET START from dos, but it is slower and eats a lot of
dos memory so it may not be practical.

>I can't find a protocol stack diagram anywhere showing me:
>a) that what I want is actually feasible
>b) what bits I should stick together to make it work

You don't need a diagram.  Just go to the WFWG network setup screen and
install tcpip, then select all the other protocols and delete them.

>There is a lot of info in the WfWorkgroups Resource Kit about how to install 
>Microsoft TCP/IP, but it does not clearly state that IFSMGR and everything 
>else would then work through TCP.  It seems those application level things 
>tie in at NETBIOS level, so would you need a NETBIOS-to-TCP/IP graunch?

As long as you are on a network interface working with an NDIS driver it
should all fly.  The catch is that you can't do SLIP or PPP directly
from the WFWG machines.  That is, the MS stack doesn't do SLIP/PPP itself
and the lanman networking doesn't run on top of the winsock interface
so you can't substitute a winsock layer that does do slip/ppp.

>What I could finally imagine is just having all my ms-windows comms 
>happening through TCP/IP, and not caring whether my UNIX gateway (and 
>what it is connected to) is in the middle.  If I can base my 
>"microsoft network" on TCP/IP, this must be possible.  Is IPX and 
>NetBLAH* all a conspiracy by Microsoft to avoid such a simple world?

Go ahead as long as other equipment is handling the routing and
connections.  Note that the lanman stuff doesn't use DNS name
resolution so you have to put your connections in the LMHOSTS file
or have an NT machine on each subnet.  If you have to obtain and
assign a few thousand IP addresses to add the PC's you may decide
that it isn't so simple after all, though.

Les Mikesell
  les@mcs.com

-----------[000262][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 94 13:22:58 MST
From:      larsenc@LCS.com
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-
Subject:   Re: Winsock Application FAQ - Updated !

In article <39v78n$atv@news.bu.edu>, landmann@acs.bu.edu says...
>
>I did just that, but for the past couple of weeks, I keep on getting the 
>following error:
>
>HT Access: Error accessing
>"http://www.ramp.com/~lcs/faqhtml.html":"SOCKET: Connection
>has been refused"
>
>Do you know wat the problem might be and how I could access this FAQ?
>>The Winsock Application FAQ has been updated !  Look for continual 
 updates over the next week or so.  
>>
>>Point your WWW client at:
>>
>>http://www.ramp.com/~lcs/faqhtml.html

The web server at at ramp.com is also home to many other home pages - in 
particular the Cyberbrothel of Brandy's Babes (of which I have absolutely no 
connection.). The incredible amount of users accesing Brandy's Babes is why 
the server often refuses connections.  This is also why I am moving the 
Winsock App FAQ to a different server.


Try:  http://www.LCS.com/faqhtml.html


It was down for a while last night and again this morning as I upgraded 
the server hardware.



Craig Larsen
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Larsen Consulting and Sales   HD's, CD-ROM Drives, Modems, Software & More !
1-800-297-8051  Orders Only   Over 1500 Satisfied UseNet/FidoNet Customers
  602-548-1542                Author of the Winsock Application FAQ
Email or Talk:  larsenc@LCS.com	    PGP Public Key Available upon request
Check out our email infoserver by sending email to:   info@LCS.com
We also have Web Pages:   http://www.LCS.com/


-----------[000263][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 16:38:04 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Class C subnetting

In article <39v12a$k28@cronkite.ocis.temple.edu> psampat@astro.ocis.temple.edu (Pragnesh Sampat) writes:
]  -----------------                     -----------------
] | 199,99,166.9    |      net1         | 199.99.166.12   |   
] | 255.255.255.192 |     --------      | 255.255.255.192 |   
] | 199.99.166.63   |                   | 199.99.166.63   |   
] |                 |                   |                 |   
] |                 |                   |                 |   
] | 199.99.166.193  |      net2         | 199.99.166.197  |   
] | 255.255.255.192 |    ---------      | 255.255.255.192 |   
] | 199.99.166.255  |                   | 199.99.166.255  |   
] |                 |                   |                 |   
] | osf/1 v2.0      |                   | SunOS 4.1.x     |   
]  -----------------                     -----------------
]
]
]1) Is the above a legal configuration?  (subnetting ok?)

No.  Net1's subnet field is all 0 and net2's subnet field is all 1.
Neither is a valid subnet.  With your netmask, valid addresses are
199.99.166.63-199.99.166.126 (broadcast 199.99.166.127) and
199.99.166.129-199.99.166.190 (broadcast 199.99.166.191).

With a two-bit subnet field you can only have 2 subnets.  In general, with
an N-bit subnet field you can have 2^N-2 subnets.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000264][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 16:52:01 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: subnet 0 ?

In article <1994Nov11.084923.382@miraculix.mitropa.com> eickholt@miraculix.mitropa.com (Frank Eickholt) writes:
>is it possibly to use Subnet 0?
>CISCO-Router allow with an option Subnet-0
>In out company we are sure that all nodes use Broadcast with
>-1 for subnet and host.

Old-style broadcast addresses are not the only conflict with subnet 0.  An
address with 0 in the host field represents that network as a whole.  In
the case of an address with 0 in the subnet and host fields it is ambiguous
as to whether it represents the network or just subnet 0 of the network.

>Now we have two nets where subnet is 0 and a few IBM-nodes
>are not able to install an IP-Adr with Subnet 0.
>IBM say now that subnet 0 is not allowed
>is that right?

Yes, IBM is right.  The subnet-0 option on the cisco is an extension they
provide that allows you to ignore the restriction.  But it should only be
used if all the other systems on your network also ignore the restriction.
In your case, since AIX enforces the rule, you can't use subnet-0.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000265][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 1994 08:49:23 GMT
From:      eickholt@miraculix.mitropa.com (Frank Eickholt)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   subnet 0 ?

Moin,
is it possibly to use Subnet 0?
CISCO-Router allow with an option Subnet-0
In out company we are sure that all nodes use Broadcast with
-1 for subnet and host.
Now we have two nets where subnet is 0 and a few IBM-nodes
are not able to install an IP-Adr with Subnet 0.
IBM say now that subnet 0 is not allowed
is that right?

so long
FRANK



-----------[000266][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 1994 09:28:21 GMT
From:      frank@beach.silcom.com (Frank Dziuba)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   HELP - Virtual IP addresses

Hi,

I want to be able to have a host machine act as if it has several IP 
addresses so I can have an HTTP daemon(s) serve data from different
directories depending on what 'host' they were connected as. 

Does anyone have any ideas on how this can be done?!

thanks
frank

--

Frank Dziuba
Silicon Beach Communications
frank@silcom.com


-----------[000267][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 1994 10:41:45 GMT
From:      jrami@netcom.com (Jon Rami)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Looking for TALK, N & YTALK, RFC's

Hi -
   Does anybody know where these standards, or protocols are defined?
In other words, if I want to write a YTALK client, where are the 
definitions set up?

Email preferred, and Thanks.

/J.R.

-- 
<------------Jon Rami------------->   /|\
<---------Ramifications----------->   ||/
<--Music, Computers, & Education-->  \||\
<--------jrami@netcom.com--------->  ____



-----------[000268][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 1994 10:50:54 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains
Subject:   Re: Public DNS

In article <Benjamin.Olken-0511941149450001@branford-college-node.net.yale.edu> Benjamin.Olken@yale.edu (Ben Olken) writes:
>I've been told that to register my domain, I need to have my domain be
>listed in at least 2 Domain Name Servers. However, while I have a computer
>& an IP#, I do not access to that computers DNS. Are there public DNS out
>there with whom I could register my domain?

You normally end up paying someone for the service (eg uunet). Alternatively
you find someone in the same situation and do a swap.

Alan

-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000269][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 94 21:41:11 -0500
From:      Bob Simon <bsimon@delphi.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Wanted: Software to Assign Subnets per RFC1219

Is there a DOS or Windows-based program that facilitates the assignment of
subnet numbers as per RFC 1219?  It would be best if it included a database
component.  Either public domain or commercial software is acceptable.
 
If there's nothing in the DOS environment that can do what I want, I could
possibly consider a program that runs under UNIX.
 
Bob Simon     bsimon@delphi.com

-----------[000270][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 94 21:43:45 -0500
From:      Bob Simon <bsimon@delphi.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Advise Wanted: Corporate Subnetting Std

My corporation has a class B address.  I am on a committee which is defining
rules by which subnet and host addresses will be assigned.  I recommended
that RFC 1219 be followed strictly, but was outvoted by those who prefer the
simplicity of assigning subnets in counting order (1-254) with a mask of
255.255.255.0.
 
This is not so terrible, but I am concerned about another proposal to assign
host addresses in predefined ranges.  For example, PCs may be assigned
addresses in the range 1-200; servers may be given addresses from 200-220;
and routers may get the range 245-254.  This would completely eliminate the
possibility of adding additional subnets (beyond 254 subnets) should the need
arise in the future.
 
I would appreciate comments discussing any advantages or disadvantages of
this proposal.  Are any of you aware of organizations which had to renumber
IP hosts due to an inflexible or inefficient addressing scheme?
 
Bob Simon     bsimon@delphi.com     (504) 593-7578

-----------[000271][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 16:37:20 GMT
From:      mikemccu@ix.netcom.com (David Michael McCutcheon)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Packet Filtering

Does anyone have information dealing with Gateways capable of performing 
packet filtering?

I'm currently working on a project in which the networking code in the 
operating system asks a user-level process to pass judgement about every 
packet that is to be forwarded.  I'm assuming that the user-level 
process is controlled by a configuration file that allows packets to be 
accepted or rejected based on source and destination addresses, source 
and destination port numbers, and protocol type.  This appears logical, 
but the process is still a bit cloudy.

Thanks in advance for any help.

---Mike---

-----------[000272][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 1994 18:35:56 GMT
From:      object@ibmpcug.co.uk (Ken Tough)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.os.ms-windows.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.setup,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,connect.audit
Subject:   Can MS-Windows(3.11) use TCP/IP as THE ONLY transport protocol?

I would like to know if it is possible to use TCP/IP for the 
"default ms-windows protocol" i.e) as the standard transport over which 
all ms-windows communications takes place.  (For example, picture a
network of WfWg machines where the only Ethernet packets are IP ones.

Windows sets up by default using NetBEUI as the transport, which is not 
routable.  Microsoft seems to be heavily into this IPX "monolithic" 
protocol which is routable, but of course, not compatible with what the 
rest of the world wants (TCP/IP).

I can't find a protocol stack diagram anywhere showing me:
a) that what I want is actually feasible
b) what bits I should stick together to make it work

There is a lot of info in the WfWorkgroups Resource Kit about how to install 
Microsoft TCP/IP, but it does not clearly state that IFSMGR and everything 
else would then work through TCP.  It seems those application level things 
tie in at NETBIOS level, so would you need a NETBIOS-to-TCP/IP graunch?

What I could finally imagine is just having all my ms-windows comms 
happening through TCP/IP, and not caring whether my UNIX gateway (and 
what it is connected to) is in the middle.  If I can base my 
"microsoft network" on TCP/IP, this must be possible.  Is IPX and 
NetBLAH* all a conspiracy by Microsoft to avoid such a simple world?

- Ken Tough
  Objective Technologies Limited
  Cornwall, United Kingdom

-----------[000273][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 18:49:53 GMT
From:      learned@winternet.com (Ed Learned)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Novell NFS

I am interested in Novells NFS product. If I install it on one of my
servers, can I mount UNIX DASD on the server, and access it from a
workstation?


--

    Ed Learned                              |  Information
    Ed.Learned@mmbbs.mn.org                 |  Highway
    learned@winternet.com                   |  Worker

-----------[000274][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 11 Nov 1994 19:43:20 GMT
From:      rustomji@swirl.monsanto.com (Eric Rustomji)
To:        vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.ucx,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.tcpware,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.multinet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Master Server TCP

In article <NEWTNews.8147.784287994.pp001529@pp001529.interramp.com>,
pp001529@interramp.com wrote:

> I am currently using DEC TCP/IP Services (UCX V3.1) under Alpha
> AXP OpenVMS V6.1.  I want to set up a "Master TCP Server" and have one
> "slave server" that manages each connection.  The master server
> does the socket() and accept() calls, and I want to spawn another
> process, pass the file descriptor to it and do write() and read()
> calls.  All this under VMS. We also are needing about 35 connections.
> 
> I really don't care if I use QIO or C RTL calls.  THe whole system
> runs under DCL, and there are lots more processes using global memory.
> 
> How does one do this under VMS?  Under UNIX I just fork() a process.
> 
> Do I need to set something up in UCX> first besides the port services (like
> /etc/services)?  
> 
> I have heard things about AST, $ASSIGN and IO$DEACCESS. If this is part of
> a possible solution, please send code, or explain again. I saw
> an interesting thread but it has been deleted on my local site.
> 
> BTW, we have no ideas if we are staying with UCX but would like to get
> the program working and evaluate performance options later.  UCX
> seems to be supported on other products, and BSD socket calls seem
> supported also.

Look into the system call SYS$CREATE_PROCESS (sort of equivalent to fork )
or similar and your master server can pass the connected socket as
sys$input,sys$output and sys$error as parameters for the system call.

I once had working code for this but I can't find it at the moment 8-(

An even easier thing to do is just write your slave process and define it
as a service in UCX. Then all you have to do is read/write to standard
input/output/error

Hope this helps you. Good luck.
-- 
Eric Rustomji
NSC Technologies                
Email: rustomji@swirl.monsanto.com
Voice: (708) 506-2246
<STD_Disclaimer>

-----------[000275][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      11 Nov 1994 18:11:30 +0100
From:      habib@ibc.inf.tu-dresden.de (Samer Habib)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   IP-addresses



I am looking for a source code in c that works on 
ULTRIX V4.3A or DEC OSF/1 V3.0 or an idea for the following problem.

I want to get all IP-addresses of a domain name (141.76.xxx.xxx).
I know that the most addresses are collected in the name server.
But the name server is usualy obsolete. Thats why I am looking for 
another solution.
Is it possible to make an broadcast message to get the IP-addresses 
from all hosts?

Thanks in advance,

Samer


# E-mail: habib@ibch21.inf.tu-dresden.de


-----------[000276][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 12 Nov 1994 01:44:58 GMT
From:      cd4v@phil.cs.Virginia.EDU (Christian  Dreke)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   When and how is the interface (Ethernet, FDDI, ..) selected.

In terms of socket to protocol, protocol to protocol, and protocol to 
hardware interface driver, how can the user select (if at all) to 
use a specific hardware interface (Ethernet, or FDDI, .), if more than
one are avalable?

How is this information stored and how is it accessed by IP to select
the right interface to output the packet to? 

Does this have to do with PCB's ?

I would greatly appreciate any help in this matter!

Thank's 

Chris.

dreke@virginia.edu



-----------[000277][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      12 Nov 94 12:22:45 MDT
From:      slhd5@cc.usu.edu
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-
Subject:   Re: Winsock Application FAQ - Updated !

>The web server at at ramp.com is also home to many other home pages - in 
>particular the Cyberbrothel of Brandy's Babes (of which I have absolutely no 
>connection.). The incredible amount of users accesing Brandy's Babes is why 
>the server often refuses connections.  This is also why I am moving the 
>Winsock App FAQ to a different server.
>
>
>Try:  http://www.LCS.com/faqhtml.html

YES!!!!!   Thank you very much for moving it!!!

-----------[000278][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      12 Nov 1994 15:45:58 -0500
From:      mattb@dgs.dgsys.com (Matt Brosius)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   What is fastest Windows based TCP/IP stack for net access/term em.

I use Host Presenter from Novell and am looking at a higher performance
option. Any suggestions?? 
-- 

mattb@dgsys.com Nextwave Technologies Corporation Washington, DC
Home of the PRO-WINDOWS Shareware Library for Access, VB, C++ and PowerBuilder

-----------[000279][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 12 Nov 1994 07:51:15 GMT
From:      fitz@wang.com (Tom Fitzgerald)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Advise Wanted: Corporate Subnetting Std

Bob Simon <bsimon@delphi.com> writes:

> I recommended that RFC 1219 be followed strictly, but was outvoted by
> those who prefer the simplicity of assigning subnets in counting order
> (1-254) with a mask of 255.255.255.0.

I'll add my vote in here....  I wouldn't do either of those.  We followed
RFC 1219 in the early days of net assignment here, and only managed to
punch so many holes all through the subnet space that it has become almost
impossible for us to use CIDR tricks internally.  As subnets have been
decommissioned and reallocated, I've been trying to consolidate neighboring
subnets and encourage people to assign nets using geographical and
topological proximity, and I like the effect of it; we gave a CIDR-like
block to some Canadian offices, a block to a bunch of interconnected X.25
links, etc.  I really wish I hadn't used RFC 1219 in the beginning.

Unless you have some overwhelming reason NOT to use an 8-bit subnet mask on
a LAN, it's by far the best choice.  It makes DNS simpler, you can put
multiple subnets on the same wire where you have big LANs, and you can
reserve a couple of 8-bit subnets and slice them up into small pieces for
point-to-point lines or whatever.

Once you've picked a subnet mask for a LAN full of hosts, it's as hard to
change the mask on that net as it would be to change all the addresses.  So
you really want to pick a good default mask up front (though it can be
different for different nets).  No matter how closely you follow RFC 1219,
you won't want to change the mask later.  Even using small subnets for
point-to-point lines will be painful unless you've set aside the subnets in
advance.

So I'd vote for assigning big blocks to relatively independent parts of
your net: US/Canada/Europe; engineering/MIS, separate business divisions or
subsidiaries, whatever.  Give densely interconnected nets neighboring
subnet numbers wherever possible, and put the coarse boundaries
(255.255.240.0 or coarser) where there are only a few high-level links.
Within a densely-interconnected block, assign subnets sequentially or at
random or however you want.  (Or apply this scheme recursively).

> This is not so terrible, but I am concerned about another proposal to assign
> host addresses in predefined ranges.  For example, PCs may be assigned
> addresses in the range 1-200; servers may be given addresses from 200-220;
> and routers may get the range 245-254.  This would completely eliminate the
> possibility of adding additional subnets (beyond 254 subnets) should the need
> arise in the future.

You're right.  Schemes like this tend to fall apart after a few months - as
soon as you get more then 20 servers on one LAN, or as soon as somebody
reveals that the "PC" with the low number is really a print-server, but
they don't want to change the address because everybody is already using
it.  We've tried a similar scheme to block off addresses for specific OS's,
but it pretty much fell by the wayside....  Besides, except for routers and
nameservers, nobody really sees IP addresses, so blocking them off serves
no real purpose.  It feels organized, but it doesn't make anything any
easier at all.

(BTW, the one scheme I've seen that's remotely like this and that works is
to give routers addresses 1-3 or so, so you can recognize them at a glance
in a traceroute or sniffer output, and give nameservers numbers that can't
easily be typo'd, like x.x.11.11.)

-- 
Tom Fitzgerald    1-508-967-5278    Preserve our electronic natural heritage!
Wang Labs         fitz@wang.com     Save the endangered line-eater!
Lowell MA, USA       Send $$ to the "Line-Eater Preservation Society" Today!

-----------[000280][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 12 Nov 1994 11:55:32 GMT
From:      zoom@tyrell.net
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Netscape Question/TCPIP

I hope someone can help me.  I am using TrumpetWinsock for a SLIP connection.  
I have all my programs (Eudora, Telenet, Netscape) as sub directories of a 
main directory called SLIP.  When I try to open Netscape , Eudora, etc. 
offline, it causes a GFT fault in Windows and I crash.  I want to be able to 
compose etc. offline.  Can anyone help?  

Thanks in advance for your help.  Please email at  zoom\@tyrell.net or answer 
here.

-----------[000281][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      13 Nov 1994 01:04:32 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HT Feed Other Domains?

In article <39ug0g$4a8@news1.shell> dstein@shell.portal.com (Doug Stein) writes:
>If I have a host registered as a domain (assume home.com) being serviced by
>a UUCP feed (ie I communicate with my service provider via a dial-up UUCP
>connection), can I, in turn, feed someone else's domain (assume other.com)?

If you want people to be able to send mail to user@other.com, you will have
to involve your service provider.  They will have to configure their mailer
to forward mail for other.com via the home.com UUCP link.

If you don't want to inform your provider, mail will have to be addressed
to other.com!user@home.com or user%other.com@home.com.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000282][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      13 Nov 1994 05:29:56 GMT
From:      trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP - Virtual IP addresses

In article <Cz3JnA.5xs@beach.silcom.com>,
Frank Dziuba <frank@beach.silcom.com> wrote:
>
>I want to be able to have a host machine act as if it has several IP 
>addresses so I can have an HTTP daemon(s) serve data from different
>directories depending on what 'host' they were connected as. 

Of course you can have multiple interfaces on the host - each
interface having its own address.

What?  You only want to use one interface?  Well, some systems
allow multiple addresses for a single interface.  On AIX, it is
done with:

ifconfig en0 1.2.3.4 netmask 255.255.255.0
ifconfig en0 1.2.3.5 netmask 255.255.255.0 alias

-- 
Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com

-----------[000283][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      13 Nov 1994 15:24:09 -0500
From:      csc3bem@cabell.vcu.edu (Bryan E. Miller)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TN5250


Can anyone out there recommend any PC-based packages to support
TN5250?  Specifically, something that will work within a Vines
environment.  Something that works under PC/TCP Ebanyan would be
great, but I'd settle for a packet driver/NDIS solution.  Please
reply directly to me and I'll post a summary.

Bryan
csc3bem@cabell.vcu.edu

-----------[000284][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      13 Nov 1994 19:32:36 -0500
From:      gwright@connix.com (Gary Wright)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP/IP Illustrated by Richard Stevens....

In article <3a610q$fp2@mimsy.cs.umd.edu>, Rajeev Ved <ved@cfar.umd.edu> wrote:
>Since this book was published in 1994, I don't suppose that they are going
>to come out with a new version pretty soon??  Just checking before I
>go out and buy it.

Volume 1 has had several reprints, but don't expect a "2nd Edition"
in the near future.  On the other hand, "TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume
2: The Implementation", by Gary R. Wright and W. Richard Stevens,
will be available in January 1995.  It will present the source
code implementation of the TCP/IP protocol suite from the 4.4BSD-Lite
implementation, which includes the latest features from Berkeley,
such as multicasting and long fat pipe support.

	Gary Wright

-----------[000285][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 13 Nov 1994 16:49:19 UNDEFINED
From:      dino@cam.org (Dino Moriello)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   HTTP server for Winsock?

Does anyone know if a http server program exist to run under a PC winsock 
platform?

Thanks,  Dino

Please reply to dino@cam.org




-----------[000286][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 13 Nov 1994 12:22:00 CET
From:      marco@dmrt-2.dmrt.nl
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Novell NFS


learned@winternet.com (Ed Learned) writes:

>I am interested in Novells NFS product. If I install it on one of my
>servers, can I mount UNIX DASD on the server, and access it from a
>workstation?

No; What it does is making your Netware server an NFS server and providing 
LPD printing services (both ways). If what you want is to NFS mount UNIX 
filesystems on a Netware server and make them available to the Netware 
clients, you need Novell NFS Gateway.

			Marco.

--

-----------[000287][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 13 Nov 1994 17:46:36 LOCAL
From:      bpack@access.mountain.net (Brian R. Pack)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-
Subject:   Re: Winsock Application FAQ - Updated !

In article <1994Nov12.122245.32615@cc.usu.edu> slhd5@cc.usu.edu writes:
>Subject: Re: Winsock Application FAQ - Updated !
>From: slhd5@cc.usu.edu
>Date: 12 Nov 94 12:22:45 MDT
 
>>The web server at at ramp.com is also home to many other home pages - in 
>>particular the Cyberbrothel of Brandy's Babes (of which I have absolutely no 
>>connection.). The incredible amount of users accesing Brandy's Babes is why 
>>the server often refuses connections.  This is also why I am moving the 
>>Winsock App FAQ to a different server.
>>
>>
>>Try:  http://www.LCS.com/faqhtml.html
 
>YES!!!!!   Thank you very much for moving it!!!

Bless you sir! And a big PBBBBBTTTTHHH! to ramp.com for not adressing the 
problem. :)
 _____        _____
|     \  /\  /     |   Brian R. Pack STG3, USN
|____  \/  \/  ____|   (619) 523-0118 x1350
     \        /
      \  /\  /_____    bpack@ctsnet.cts.com
       \//\\//     |
        /  \/   ___|   Montani
        \      /                              Semper
         \    /                                                   Liberi
          \  /           WVTubas '87 & '89
           \/                              Will work for PowerBars.

-----------[000288][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      13 Nov 1994 21:38:34 GMT
From:      ved@cfar.umd.edu (Rajeev Ved)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP/IP Illustrated by Richard Stevens....

Since this book was published in 1994, I don't suppose that they are going
to come out with a new version pretty soon??  Just checking before I
go out and buy it.

Rajeev.


-----------[000289][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 94 05:56:42 MDT
From:      slhd5@cc.usu.edu
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-
Subject:   Re: Winsock Application FAQ - Updated !

Jeff while Netscaping <jeff@econ.berkeley.edu> writes:

>
>> >
>> >Try:  http://www.LCS.com/faqhtml.html
>>
>> YES!!!!!   Thank you very much for moving it!!!
>
>NO!!!!   I can not connect to this host!!!
>
Me either!!!!   AAAGGHHHH!!!!!!!!!!

-----------[000290][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 01:00:07 GMT
From:      Jeff while Netscaping <jeff@econ.berkeley.edu>
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-
Subject:   Re: Winsock Application FAQ - Updated !


> >
> >Try:  http://www.LCS.com/faqhtml.html
>
> YES!!!!!   Thank you very much for moving it!!!

NO!!!!   I can not connect to this host!!!

:)


-----------[000291][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 14 Nov 1994 05:04:01 GMT
From:      frank@beach.silcom.com (Frank Dziuba)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP - Virtual IP addresses

Tony Rall (trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com) wrote:
: In article <Cz3JnA.5xs@beach.silcom.com>,
: Frank Dziuba <frank@beach.silcom.com> wrote:
: >
: >I want to be able to have a host machine act as if it has several IP 
: >addresses so I can have an HTTP daemon(s) serve data from different
: >directories depending on what 'host' they were connected as. 
 
: Of course you can have multiple interfaces on the host - each
: interface having its own address.
 
: What?  You only want to use one interface?  Well, some systems
: allow multiple addresses for a single interface.  On AIX, it is
: done with:
 
: ifconfig en0 1.2.3.4 netmask 255.255.255.0
: ifconfig en0 1.2.3.5 netmask 255.255.255.0 alias

And how do you do it on a Sun?

--

Frank Dziuba
Silicon Beach Communications
frank@silcom.com


-----------[000292][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 19:31:37 -0800
From:      stevel@crl.com (Steven Lawson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stevens' TCP/IP book sources

W. Richard Stevens (rstevens@noao.edu) wrote:
[stuff deleted]

This is the coolest part of his books.  He hangs out on c.p.tcp-ip and
answers questions!  BTW - the books are great, looking forward to V2..

-----------[000293][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 14 Nov 1994 06:41:27 GMT
From:      marstein@netcom.com (Martin Stein)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Mac RPC problem on differentnetworks?


I have a problem with a client-server program using RPC on the Mac.
The Mac is running System 7.5, MacTCP 2.0.4 and is using the SK 1.4
socket library with the XP-RPC package.

I wrote a client-program on a Macintosh that gets data via RPC from a
Unix server. The (client-) program already runs on Unix and Windows
using the same RPC calls.

I work in two offices: one is in LAN A1, that is in the same domain as
LAN A2.  LAN B is connected to LAN A1 by a filtering router (for
security.)


       non-filtering router
        /
LAN A1 * --- LAN A2  (domain .a)
   * (filtering router)
   |
   | 56 Kb connection
   |
LAN B  (domain .b)


Servers are in LAN A1, A2 and B.

When the server is in the same network as the Mac everything works
fine. When I access a server on LAN A? from LAN B, I get an "RPC
error: remote system error 61"; 61 seems to be a "protocol error"
(from errno.h).

That program run on a Mac on the LAN A1 could access a server on LAN
A2. These two LANs are connected by a router.  However, when I go from
LAN B over a 56kBit line to a server on LAN A? (? = 1 or 2) I get the
above error. Connections to a server in LAN B work fine.

One could now think that the problem is a the filtering router between
LANs A and B; that the router filters my RPC packets out. But the same
packets go through when sent from a windows client (or unix) program.

Somehow the packets from the Mac could be different from the Unix or
windows ones. Is that possible or could there be another reason?

Martin Stein
-- 

----------------------------------------
Martin Stein
Ixos Software GmbH, Munich, Germany
SAP America Inc, Foster City, CA
Email:
martin.stein@ixos.de
marstein@netcom.com
100031.2333@CompuServe.COM


-----------[000294][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 15:57:44 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: When and how is the interface (Ethernet, FDDI, ..) selected.

In article <Cz4suy.8FC@murdoch.acc.Virginia.EDU> cd4v@phil.cs.Virginia.EDU (Christian  Dreke) writes:
>In terms of socket to protocol, protocol to protocol, and protocol to 
>hardware interface driver, how can the user select (if at all) to 
>use a specific hardware interface (Ethernet, or FDDI, .), if more than
>one are avalable?

In general, the user can't select the hardware interface.  Routing table
entries normally include the outgoing interface, so the the interface is
chosen based on the destination address.  If the system runs a dynamic
routing protocol the outgoing interface will be the interface over which a
route was learned.  If you use static routing, the interface will be the
one on the subnet containing the specified next-hop gateway.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000295][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 16:22:01 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Advise Wanted: Corporate Subnetting Std

In article <3a7tp8$a19@nanette.pdb.sni.de> Martin W Freiss <freiss.pad@sni.de> writes:
>Addresses are just addresses and should not be overloaded with other 
>information.
>Any such scheme will fail in the real world, be it because one subnet has
>more than 20 servers, or be it because a PC can also be a server.
>If you have a starlike network around a central backbone, using *.*.*.1
>as the router address is often done - it is easy to remember, and users
>usually like it when the routers always have "the same" address in a 
>subnet.

For some reason, at my old site we used .250 for the router.  When we added
a redundant router it was given the address .249.  And our bridges, which
had different addresses for each interface onto a subnet, used addresses
working up from .240.  We used high numbers for these things probably
because in our single-network days we used low numbers for the hosts.

Another numbering scheme we tried was that the a multihomed host on subnets
A and B would have addresses xx.xx.A.B and xx.xx.B.A.  This scheme broke
down when a pair of subnets had more than one common host or when a
multihomed host had more than two interfaces.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000296][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 10:44:09 GMT
From:      Anonymous
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   How to get the ethernet address of the host itself ?

I want to get the ethernet address of the host itself. My O.S. is UNIX SVR 4.0.

-----------[000297][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 94 16:47:41 CST
From:      gm0551s@acad.drake.edu (George W. Miller)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   secondary routing reference

Hello

Can anyone give me a good reference on secondary routing so we may have
different ip network numbers on the same wire?

Thanks
-- 
*************************************************************************
George W. Miller, Director               Internet: gmiller@acad.drake.edu
Office of Academic Computing            Telephone: (515) 271-2935
Drake University, Des Moines, IA 50311        FAX: (515) 271-3977
*************************************************************************

-----------[000298][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 11:02:47 GMT
From:      andrew@labyrinth.bt.co.uk (Andrew Lucking)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Stevens' TCP/IP book sources

Hi

I have 2 questions.

First, I am reading 'Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume 2' by Douglas E. Comer
and David L. Stevens. The book says that the example code is available in
machine readable form but gives no details of where to get it. Does anyone
known where the code can be found, is it on a ftp site?

Secondly, I have seen references to other books by Stevens but the name given is
Richard Stevens. Is this a different person and what books has he written?
I am currently writing a UDP/IP so I am only really intereested in books
about this subject.

Thanks 
Andrew


-----------[000299][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 11:12:16 GMT
From:      Ziga Turk <ziga.turk@fagg.uni-lj.si>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   DHCP server for HP-UX

Is there a free DHCP server for UNIX (HP-UX). Where?
Please reply by e-mail to: zturk@fagg.uni-lj.si.

Thanks,

v
Ziga



-----------[000300][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 11:55:41 GMT
From:      Anonymous
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   How to get the ethernet hardware address of the host itself ?

Sorry. In last post, I forgot to sign.

The question is how to get the ethernet hardware address of the host
itself ? The O.S. on host is UNIX SVR 4.0. Is there any C function or
system call can work for this problem ?

Thank in advance.

C. H. LIN        linch@necta.nec.com.tw

-----------[000301][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 14:22:15 GMT
From:      Clark Bremer <clarkb@netstar.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Novell NFS

> I am interested in Novells NFS product. If I install it on one of my
> servers, can I mount UNIX DASD on the server, and access it from a
> workstation?
 
Actually, the Novell NFS product is for going the other way - to make
the Netware file system available to UNIX machines, by making it 
into an NFS server.  

To get the functionality you describe, all you need is a TCP/IP stack
for your PC that supports NFS.  All the good ones do.  Check out FTP
Software's PC/TCP, or InterCon's TCP/Connect II.  You will probably 
need to run a small program on the Host also (PCNFS).  CB.

 =========================================================================
||             ___    ___                                                ||
||            /   \  /   \       Clark Bremer ( clarkb@netstar.com )     ||
||           /      /   __)      Software Engineer                       ||
||          (      /    \        NetStar Inc.                            ||
||           \    /      )       10250 Valley View Road                  ||
||            \__/ _____/        Minneapolis, MN 55344                   ||
||                                                                       ||
 =========================================================================


-----------[000302][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 14:35:03 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stevens' TCP/IP book sources

> First, I am reading 'Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume 2' by Douglas E. Comer
> and David L. Stevens. The book says that the example code is available in
> machine readable form but gives no details of where to get it. Does anyone
> known where the code can be found, is it on a ftp site?

Take a look at ftp://cs.purdue.edu/pub/Xinu.

> Secondly, I have seen references to other books by Stevens but the name given
> is Richard Stevens. Is this a different person and what books has he written?

Yes, we are different people, but often confused.  (I have a son named David,
but at age 3 he hasn't written any books, yet.)  My books are published
under "W. Richard Stevens" and are:

"UNIX Network Programming", Prentice-Hall, 1990
"Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment", Addison-Wesley, 1992
"TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1: The Protocols", Addison-Wesley, 1994
"TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 2: The Implementation", by Gary R. Wright and
	myself, Addison-Wesley, 1995 (due out in January).

Contact me by email for the TOC for any of these.

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000303][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 14:55:36 GMT
From:      Martin W Freiss <freiss.pad@sni.de>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Advise Wanted: Corporate Subnetting Std

In <x663kKZ.bsimon@delphi.com> Bob Simon <bsimon@delphi.com> writes:

>My corporation has a class B address.  I am on a committee which is defining
>rules by which subnet and host addresses will be assigned.  I recommended
>that RFC 1219 be followed strictly, but was outvoted by those who prefer the
>simplicity of assigning subnets in counting order (1-254) with a mask of
>255.255.255.0.

While not technically necessary, I would advise using the 255.255.255.0
mask unless there are powerful other reasons not to.
We ran into quite a bit of trouble in our R&D department some years ago
when we used another netmask and found quite a few OS's that had problems
with this (usually in the network setup scripts which expected the
netmask to end on a byte boundary. This has since been fixed.).

Users readily understand a 255.255.255.0 netmask, which eliminates
a lot of misconfiguration. 
It makes delegating DNS reverse zones a lot easier.


>This is not so terrible, but I am concerned about another proposal to assign
>host addresses in predefined ranges.  For example, PCs may be assigned
>addresses in the range 1-200; servers may be given addresses from 200-220;
>and routers may get the range 245-254.  This would completely eliminate the
>possibility of adding additional subnets (beyond 254 subnets) should the need
>arise in the future.

Addresses are just addresses and should not be overloaded with other 
information.
Any such scheme will fail in the real world, be it because one subnet has
more than 20 servers, or be it because a PC can also be a server.
If you have a starlike network around a central backbone, using *.*.*.1
as the router address is often done - it is easy to remember, and users
usually like it when the routers always have "the same" address in a 
subnet.

Remember CIDR, and give out contiguous chunks of subnets to departments
in different cities/countries/continents.

Just my 2 cents,

-Martin

--
 Martin Freiss               | R&D computer center | freiss.pad@sni.de 
 Siemens Nixdorf Infosystems | Dept. MR OI 4       | NIC MF194
 Paderborn, Germany          | Phone +49 5251 8 15642  

-----------[000304][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 14 Nov 1994 15:58:32 GMT
From:      cbruno@world.std.com (charlie bruno)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Need your opinion

	Network World, the industry newsweekly on enterprise network
computing, is assembling an end of year forecast issue. As part of our
presentation, we are trying to amass a number of opinions from folks like
you concerning what you believe will be the most pivotal event in the
network industry in 1995.
	If you are interested in participating, please E-mail your
response to cbruno@world.std.com. We will publish some of these responses
in the Dec. 26th issue of Network World.
	Basically, we need a short description (anywhere from one to five
short paragraphs) describing what you believe will be the pivotal event
that shapes your network and the industry in 1995.
	Or, if you'd rather, we are also asking folks to tell us what
network tools they need most for 1995.
	Please include your name, title, company affiliation and phone
number, in the event we need to contact you.
	Thanks for your help and your interest in Network World. 




-- 
Cheers for now,

Charlie Bruno, Features Editor
Network World  -- The Newsweekly of Enterprise Network Computing

-----------[000305][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 16:29:00 GMT
From:      swift@ectds.com (The Beyonder)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Routing vs. Bridging...

Hello fellow Netters,
    I was wondering if anyone out there could point me in the right
direction.  I am looking for any research (i.e. whitepapers, FAQs,
etc.) on bridging vs. routing.  I figured this would be the place to
ask.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance,
John

_______________________________________________________
Hardware, n.:
        The parts of a computer system that can be kicked.

                    __________
"John Swift"       /_______/_
swift@ectds.com      / /_
Snr. Systems Engr.  /_/_  RIDENT DATA SYSTEMS

-----------[000306][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 14 Nov 1994 16:35:05 GMT
From:      kpritch@ernsty.co.uk (Kevin Pritchard)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows,comp.protocol.appletalk,comp.protocol.tcp-ip,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.networking,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Re: PC <----> MAC Linking

How would this solution work for a small Windows for Workgroups network of 5 
dell 486s, presumably connected using a thin ethernet and adding a single Mac?
I have a friend who needs to do this.
Presumably, using softwindows, you could access all data and binaries for 
windows, and use applets such as Microsft mail.

Any experience out there?

In article <39u2r5$4jj@panix.com> gene@panix.com (Gene) writes:
>From: gene@panix.com (Gene)
>Subject: Re: PC <----> MAC Linking
>Date: 10 Nov 1994 16:20:37 -0500
 
>G.G. Owenson (ggo1@le.ac.uk) wrote:
>: Is it possible to link in some way a Mac (performa 475) and a PC (386)
>: directly using an ethernet network?
 
>Yep.  My wife and I have our two computers networked together at home.  She
>has a Mac Quadra, I have a Micron Pentium.  We use Farallon's TIMBUKTU PRO
>for the Mac, and TIMBUKTU FOR WINDOWS on the PC.  It's a true ethernet
>network, we have access to each other's hard drives and full file sharing
>capabilities.  We also have her printer (which has an ethernet connection)
>available to both computers thru the net.  It's inexpensive, and it does
>everything we want!
 
>-gene
>gene@panix.com
 
>: We have 2 Macs and a PC, both are connected to fileservers over an ethernet
>: network (separate servers), and each have unique IP addresses. The 2 Macs
>: can share data using AppleTalk (AppleShare). However, we have a printer
>: connected to the PC which should idealy be available to the Macs as well.
 
>: The printer is not connected directly to the Ethernet, but only to the
>: PCs parallel port. I realise it would probably be impossible to print 
>: directly from the Macs on the PC printer, but is it possible to dump files
>: from one to the other (At the moment this can be done using a UNIX host, but
>: this is quite time-consuming).
 
>: Can the PC in some way AppleTalk to the Macs and vice-versa. Idealy this
>: would be a software solution. Or is it possible to make the PC a server, 
>: which the Macs could logon to using telnet/ftp.
 
>: Mac - OS 7.5
>: PC  - Dos 5, Win 3.1, MCA
>: Network - Novell ver ? (4)
 
>: Any ideas would be grately appreciated.
 
>: G. Owenson

+---------------------------+--------------------------------+
| Kevin Pritchard           | Direct line : +44 071 931 1492 |
|                           | Switchboard : +44 071 928 2000 |
|                           | Fax         : +44 071 931 6500 |
| Ernst & Young             |                                |
| NIS - Systems Development |                                |
| London, UK                | E-Mail : kpritch@ernsty.co.uk  | 
+---------------------------+--------------------------------+


-----------[000307][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 19:02:46 GMT
From:      bwc@phoenix.cs.uga.edu (Brantley Coile)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: IP addressing strategies

I worked with a new company that has a product that will translate
unregistered IP addresses into registered IP addresses dynamicly.
It sits between the internal and external internet.
The company is Network Translation Technologies and the product
is PIX for Private Internet eXchange.

Hope this helps.

Brantley Coile
bwc@tbcc.com

-----------[000308][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 19:05:42 GMT
From:      bwc@phoenix.cs.uga.edu (Brantley Coile)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: IP addressing strategies

> I worked with a new company that has a product that will translate
> unregistered IP addresses into registered IP addresses dynamicly.
> It sits between the internal and external internet.
> The company is Network Translation Technologies and the product
> is PIX for Private Internet eXchange.

Oh, and their number is 415-494-63877

Brantley Coile
bwc@tbcc.com

-----------[000309][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 19:31:43 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing vs. Bridging...

>    I was wondering if anyone out there could point me in the right
> direction.  I am looking for any research (i.e. whitepapers, FAQs,
> etc.) on bridging vs. routing.

I'd start with the following:

  %T Interconnections: Bridges and Routers
  %A R. Perlman
  %I Addison-Wesley
  %C Reading, Mass.
  %D 1992

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000310][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 20:30:46 GMT
From:      Steinar.Haug@runit.sintef.no (Steinar Haug)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP - Virtual IP addresses

> : What?  You only want to use one interface?  Well, some systems
> : allow multiple addresses for a single interface.  On AIX, it is
> : done with:
 
> : ifconfig en0 1.2.3.4 netmask 255.255.255.0
> : ifconfig en0 1.2.3.5 netmask 255.255.255.0 alias
> 
> And how do you do it on a Sun?

With SunOS 4.1.x, you don't. With Solaris 2.x, it's possible using the
following (unpublished and liable to change) feature:

ifconfig le0 1.2.3.4
ifconfig le0:1 1.2.3.5

Steinar Haug, SINTEF RUNIT, University of Trondheim, NORWAY
Email: Steinar.Haug@runit.sintef.no

PS: It's actually possible to do it in SunOS 4.1.x also - but requires
some trickery (using the "vif" module from John Ioannidis). Recommended
only for those interested in kernel hacking :-)

-----------[000311][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      14 Nov 1994 20:40:52 GMT
From:      namn@synoptics.com (Nam Nguyen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Test


Test article.




-----------[000312][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 14 Nov 1994 23:55:33 GMT
From:      bpeoples@iglou.iglou.com (Ben Peoples)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   PPP via telnet

Does anybody know if its possible to run PPPD via a telnet (or any way of connecting 
two computers over the 'net).  It seems that you would just asyncmap (escape out)
the ^] character...

					Anyone?
					  Ben

-- 
Ben Peoples					       	bpeoples@iglou.com
Unless otherwise stated, the above opinions are ***WORDS***
"As I said, with this net I will catch them, I bet.  With this net I will catch
those things, yet!"  --- _The Cat in The Hat_

-----------[000313][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 00:14:45 +0000
From:      mpdillon@halcyon.com (Michael Dillon)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   need good explanation of CIDR and Class C subnetting

Is there a FAQ or other net.document that explains issues such
as CIDR blocks, subnetting Class C addresses, subnetting in relation
to SLIP/PPP on terminal servers, and maybe some routing stuff too.

As you can see by the reference to Class C addresses, I am looking
for info that is geared to the smaller shop which might have 
a single router to the Internet connected to a LAN with several
ethernet-connected hosts plus a terminal server with several 
SLIP/PPP connections and another router with a WAN connection
to a remote LAN.

This is a reasonably complex situation to dive into and yet
it is precisely the situation that most new connections to
the net must deal with these days.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
"How to Make a FORTUNE on the Information Superhighway"
This book is written by two lawyers who can't even spell `libel.'

Michael Dillon                    mpdillon@halcyon.com
C-4 Powerhouse, RR #2             michael@junction.net
Armstrong, BC   V0E 1B0           Fido: 1:353/350
Canada                             BBS: +1-604-546-2705

-----------[000314][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 09:14:54 -0500
From:      r7980@hopi.dtcc.edu (Joe Rach)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stevens' TCP/IP book sources

  Now I'm getting jealous.... I can't wait for x-mas now.....

  The author of Applied Cryptography (Bruce) hangs out on sci.crypt
  and answers questions too.... 

  The feeling of being able to communicate with the author of a 
  worshiped book is a great one....

							     jOe...



-----------[000315][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 01:22:52 GMT
From:      tli@cisco.com (Tony Li)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Putting school network on Internet via SLIP

In article <BILLW.94Nov1150542@glare.cisco.com> billw@glare.cisco.com (William ) writes:
    Putting 100 real-time (WWW, ftp, gopher, telnet) users behind a SLIP
    link is a recipe for disaster.  Consider limiting the number of concurrent
    interactive internet users to less than 10, and/or some kind of "batching"
    that prevents the need for all 100 systems to access the internet directly.
    A single slip link can handle a LOT of non-interactive traffic (mail, news.)
    Probably even enough for 100 users, but that's cause it gets spread out over
    all the hours in the day, rather than just the hours of interactive use.
    
    I wonder if the Mosaic people are working on "www spoofing" and proxy
    agents, to solve problems like this.  It would certainly be nice to be able
    to specify a set of www trees to keep "current" on a local server, and have
    them automatically cached on a local proxy server...
    
    BillW
    


What?  You don't run slip at T1?

;-)

Tony

-----------[000316][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 04:31:54 GMT
From:      nsrcchk@leonis.nus.sg (Heng Kek)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.parallel.pvm
Subject:   Q:Protocols & Comms Media

I've often heard people ask things like, "Does PVM work over an FDDI
network?  ATM?"  I've wondered about this because I've always
thought that any sort of tcp/ip application should work over ANY
physical media so long as tcp/ip is used.
Am I missing something?
Hope someone can clear up the air.  (As you can see, I'm not too
well-versed in networking.  Books I've read don't seem to explicitly
explain such things.)

Thanks
Heng Kek

-----------[000317][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 94 11:18:09 EST
From:      stein@gcomm.com
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Local echoing for Telnet protocol


IC>In article <39rh3o$j54@charm.magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu>,
IC>prabau@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu (Patrick F Rabau) writes:
IC>[...]
IC>|>     telnet> mode line
IC>|> 1   SENT dont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD
IC>|> 2   SENT dont ECHO
IC>|> 3   RCVD wont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD (don't reply)
IC>|> 4   RCVD will ECHO (reply)
IC>|> 5   SENT do ECHO (reply)
IC>|>
IC>|> Isn't this a violation of the telnet protocol? [...]

IC>Absolutely.  A telnet implementation must always accept DONT and WONT,
IC>and must always default to all options off (NVT mode).

Not necessarily.  I assume the issue here is that line 4 appears to
illegally contradict line 2?  This report of telnet option negotiation is
wholly from the client's perspective, and the server might very well
have legitimately sent the "will ECHO" (4) immediately upon connect,
before it received the client's "dont ECHO" (2).  The fact that the
client interpreted line 4 as a reply to line 2 is one of the boneheaded
facts of life of telnet option negotiation:  that replies and requests
aren't distinguishable except by context.

-- Bob Stein, Galacticomm

--
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
 | . The Galacticomm Demo System - 305.583.7808 - Home of The Major BBS . |
 | . Telnet/FTP: gcomm.com (199.227.15.16) - WWW: http://www.gcomm.com/ . |
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------


-----------[000318][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 06:26:04 GMT
From:      aboba@netcom.com (Bernard Aboba)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stevens' TCP/IP book sources

stevel@crl.com (Steven Lawson) writes:

>W. Richard Stevens (rstevens@noao.edu) wrote:
>[stuff deleted]
 
>This is the coolest part of his books.  He hangs out on c.p.tcp-ip and
>answers questions!  BTW - the books are great, looking forward to V2..
 
Yes, TCP/IP Illustrated Volume 1 is superb. I wonder what he'll do for
volume 3...

-----------[000319][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 94 06:29:08 GMT
From:      arothwel@cisco.com (Andrew Rothwell)
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Network/System Performance Evaluation: X over IP over Ethernet.

I'm wanting to conduct a performance evaluation of our Sun Sparc10.
We have an ethernet, with 6 X-terminals, 3 routers and a terminal
server attached. We are thinking of adding another 4 X-terminals.

I want to determine current ethernet bandwidth utilisiation due to
various applications using IP over ethernet - in particular X.

I also want to determine what amount of system resource is consumed
by X related software running on the Sun - in particular CPU.

Can anyone point me to (freeware) tools that I can *easily* use to
conduct this evaluation?

Tanks in advance,
Andrew.

-- 
_______________________________________________________________________________
"Runnin' down a dream,                                Andrew R. Rothwell.
 Workin' on a mystery,                                arothwel@metaplex.com
 Goin' wherever it leads."                            Metaplex Pty Ltd.
                                                      Lvl 13, 118 Alfred St,
-Tom Petty.                                           Milsons Point. NSW. 2061.
                                                      AUSTRALIA.

-----------[000320][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 15:12:56 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing procedures inside hosts

In article <3aabhv$h33@beatles.cselt.stet.it> teisa@beatles.cselt.stet.it (Claudio Teisa) writes:
>dear all,
> I am trying to understand the routing mechanism in Internet, there are a 
> couple of questions (at least for the moment) I have not been able to answer.

What references have you tried?  I think your questions should be answered
in "Internetworking with TCP/IP, Volume 2" and the forthcoming "TCP/IP
Illustrated, Volume 2".

>1) What happens when two hosts with different {netid, subnetid} but 
>   interconnected on the same physical network whishes to communicate?
>   What is consulted first (or at all), the ARP table or the routing table?

In most implementations, the routing table.  If this indicates that the
destination is on a connected network, ARP is used to determine the
destination's MAC address.  If this indicates that it's on a different
network the routing table will give the IP address of a router, and ARP is
used to determine the corresponding MAC address.

>   I.e. is the ARP protocol used when the IP address of the destination 
>        indicates a different network?

Yes, to determine the MAC address of the router, as described above.

>	If yes, is it the router to answer the broadcast ARP request?

Yes, since it's the router's address you're trying to learn.

>	If no and no route has been manually configured, neither explicit 
>        nor default, is the packet discarded?

If there's no route, then the packet will be discarded, and the application
will generally receive an error.

Another possibility, which you may be thinking of, is "proxy ARP".  In this
situation, the host may be configured with a network mask that treats
several (or all) network or subnets as a single network.  Many routers can
be configured to respond to ARP queries if they specify an IP address that
they would normally route to.

>2) What happens when two host with the same {netid, subnet} but interconnected
>   with two different physical network (connected by a router of course) wishes
>   to communicate?

This is an invalid configuration.  If you want to break up a logical
network into multiple physical networks you must use a bridge, not a
router.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000321][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 94 12:00:46 EST
From:      stein@gcomm.com
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Stevens' TCP/IP book sources


IA>First, I am reading 'Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume 2' by Douglas E. Com
IA>and David L. Stevens. The book says that the example code is available in
IA>machine readable form but gives no details of where to get it. Does anyone
IA>known where the code can be found, is it on a ftp site?

They appear to be different people.

IA>Secondly, I have seen references to other books by Stevens but the name give
IA>is
IA>Richard Stevens. Is this a different person and what books has he written?
IA>I am currently writing a UDP/IP so I am only really intereested in books
IA>about this subject.

Richard Stevens' TCP/IP Illustrated is outstanding.  I strongly
recommend it.

-- Bob Stein, Galacticomm

--
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
 | . The Galacticomm Demo System - 305.583.7808 - Home of The Major BBS . |
 | . Telnet/FTP: gcomm.com (199.227.15.16) - WWW: http://www.gcomm.com/ . |
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------


-----------[000322][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 08:37:16 GMT
From:      trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: secondary routing reference

In article <1994Nov14.164741@acad.drake.edu>,
George W. Miller <gm0551s@acad.drake.edu> wrote:
>
>Can anyone give me a good reference on secondary routing so we may have
>different ip network numbers on the same wire?

"Secondary routing"?  I've never heard that term applied to having 2
logical nets on the same physical net.  To me it would mean something
closer to backup routing, but that does not imply multiple nets per
net.

Anyway, there are 3 ways to get multiple subnets on one link:

* Shorten your subnet mask so that it encompasses both of the 
  original subnets.  Doing so may prevent you from reaching other
  subnets that are now subsumed by your new, broader subnet definition.

* Subnet route to the other of subnet on the shared link via routers
  that have "interfaces" on both subnets.  These can be distinct
  physical interfaces or a single interface that has an IP address
  alias capability.  (This is probably the normal way of achieving
  your goal.)

* Here's a trick I learned recently, but it may not work with
  all software:  network routes with a metric of 0 mean "local
  to this interface".  If the software on all of your hosts support
  this concept, you can share the link without using an
  extraneous routing hop.  Assume one host's subnet is 1.2.3.0
  (address 1.2.3.1), and it also needs to talk to 1.2.4.0 on the same
  physical link.
 
  ifconfig en0 1.2.3.1 netmask 255.255.255.0
  route add net 1.2.4.0 1.2.3.1 0
  
  Which means:  route net 1.2.4.0 via my own interface and treat
  it as a local subnet (i.e., use "arp" for addresses on this 
  subnet).  This type of route statement would have to be statically
  added to all machines on both subnets.

-- 
Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com

-----------[000323][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 21:42:50 -0600
From:      resnick@uiuc.edu (Pete Resnick)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Cc:        jfroissart@andersen.com
Subject:   Re: Real Time Voice Processing over the Internet

In article <3ab64h$aec@grant.cstar.andersen.com>, jfroissart@andersen.com
(Jean-Louis Froissart) wrote:

> I am working on some real time voice transmission over the Internet.
> Does anyone know about any API for windows or mac that would have been
 developped
> for that purpose ? Is there any code available on the Internet that
 would have 
> that functionality ?

For the Macintosh, there is a program called Maven that is being worked on
here at the University of Illinois. The author of the program is Charley
Kline (kline@uiuc.edu) and currently his graduate assistant who is working
on the code is Eric Scouten (scouten@uiuc.edu).

pr
-- 
Pete Resnick    (...so what is a mojo, and why would one be rising?)
Doctoral Student - Philosophy Department, Gregory Hall, UIUC
System manager - Cognitive Science Group, Beckman Institute, UIUC
Internet: resnick@uiuc.edu

-----------[000324][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 11:43:42 GMT
From:      farley@ipinc.com (Farley Stewart)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Putting school network on Internet via SLIP

In article <3a92hc$s5h@cronkite.cisco.com>, tli@cisco.com (Tony Li) says:
>
>In article <BILLW.94Nov1150542@glare.cisco.com> billw@glare.cisco.com (William ) writes:
>    Putting 100 real-time (WWW, ftp, gopher, telnet) users behind a SLIP
>    link is a recipe for disaster.  Consider limiting the number of concurrent
>    interactive internet users to less than 10, and/or some kind of "batching"
>    that prevents the need for all 100 systems to access the internet directly.
>    A single slip link can handle a LOT of non-interactive traffic (mail, news.)
>    Probably even enough for 100 users, but that's cause it gets spread out over
>    all the hours in the day, rather than just the hours of interactive use.
>    
>    I wonder if the Mosaic people are working on "www spoofing" and proxy
>    agents, to solve problems like this.  It would certainly be nice to be able
>    to specify a set of www trees to keep "current" on a local server, and have
>    them automatically cached on a local proxy server...
>    
>    BillW
>    

Actually the CERN WWW server already supports WWW proxy and caching.
We setup a lot of Internet server for schools and use the WWW caching
feature to solve exactly this problem.  It is always the case of the
more bandwidth the better, but even 56k-128Kbps bogs down quickly in
a classroom environment with 30+ students all utilizing Mosaic to access
a particular site simultaneously.  Caching helps a great deal. In an 
instructional situation, the teacher can prime the cache by walking 
through their lesson plan prior to class.  This makes access by the 
students extremely fast.  

If you would like more information on our InterGate Internet server
and/or how we utilize proxy/caching services in the classroom please 
drop me a note.

Farley Stewart
farley@ipinc.com
http://www.ipinc.com


-----------[000325][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 11:54:54 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Packet Filtering

In article <3a06k0$5s1@ixnews1.ix.netcom.com> mikemccu@ix.netcom.com (David Michael McCutcheon) writes:
>I'm currently working on a project in which the networking code in the 
>operating system asks a user-level process to pass judgement about every 
>packet that is to be forwarded.  I'm assuming that the user-level 
>process is controlled by a configuration file that allows packets to be 
>accepted or rejected based on source and destination addresses, source 
>and destination port numbers, and protocol type.  This appears logical, 
>but the process is still a bit cloudy.

Its called screend, its been done 8)

Alan
-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000326][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 01:33:44 -0800
From:      haltarac@rain.org
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP - Virtual IP addresses

Frank Dziuba (frank@beach.silcom.com) wrote:
: Hi,
 
: I want to be able to have a host machine act as if it has several IP 
: addresses so I can have an HTTP daemon(s) serve data from different
: directories depending on what 'host' they were connected as. 

It looks complicated. Why would you need this. If your goal is to hide
some parts of the directory names behind an IP address, then
you can problably make something more elegant by just mounting those
directories just under /

-----
Henri Altarac		haltarac@rain.org		Software Consultant
Santa Barbara

-----------[000327][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 00:11:44 -0600
From:      resnick@uiuc.edu (Pete Resnick)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,soc.culture.iranian
Subject:   Re: Real Time Voice Processing over the Internet

In article <samgCzCHr1.KD1@netcom.com>, samg@netcom.com (Sam Ghandchi) wrote:

> Pete Resnick (resnick@uiuc.edu) wrote:
> : In article <3ab64h$aec@grant.cstar.andersen.com>, jfroissart@andersen.com
> : (Jean-Louis Froissart) wrote:
 
> : > I am working on some real time voice transmission over the Internet.
 
> : For the Macintosh, there is a program called Maven....
> 
> is this multimedia or just voice?

Maven is just audio, voice or otherwise. I believe (though again, the
authors should be consulted) that the Maven code is incorporated into
CuSeeMe, which is Cornell University's audio/video application for the
Macintosh.

pr
-- 
Pete Resnick    (...so what is a mojo, and why would one be rising?)
Doctoral Student - Philosophy Department, Gregory Hall, UIUC
System manager - Cognitive Science Group, Beckman Institute, UIUC
Internet: resnick@uiuc.edu

-----------[000328][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 14:46:52 GMT
From:      Andreas Eiss <eiss@ls3.informatik.uni-dortmund.de>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Sockets - on IP-Layer (SOCK_RAW)???

When I open a socket there is a possibilty to set the socket-type to
SOCK_RAW. Since
I want to send messages on the IP-Layer, I tried to send messages with
that type of sockets, but without success. Sockets on IP-Layer are not
described in the manuals, therfore I have no idea what is wrong in my
implementation. 
If anybody made experiences using IP-sockets, please send me an example
how to do it.

Andreas

-----------[000329][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 23:08:06 -0500
From:      mascari@cis.ohio-state.edu (michael v mascari)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: lpr client ... HELP!

:Hi.
 
:I have a berkley style printer daemon running on my PC using the
:trumpet tcp/ip stack. I *want* to be able to print to my PC's printer
:from my unix shell account (a BSD system). I don't have root access to this
:machine and the administator is unwilling to give me a printcap entry which 
:allow me to use the standard lpr command (not to mention everyone else!)
:So I had to find an lpr client that would allow me to specify 
:a remote host to print to (my machine! :) ) instead of a remote print queue. 
:After some searching I found W. Richard Stevens' lpr client. I got it to 
:compile but when running it got the following error message:
:
:	"mylpr: error, server returned: Malformed 'from' address"
:
:After some investigation (on a different machine on which I had root access)
:I found out that the "mylpr" program had to be owned by root and have
:it's setuid bit on in order for it to work.
:
:I would *prefer* to get the lpr client working without "root" intervention.
:
:Any suggestions on what to do next? 
:
:Any help is appreciated,
:Steve Nielsen
:snielsen@xnet.com

	I too looked into an lpr client.  I was running AmiTCP which is
a freely redistributable TCP/IP protocol stack for the Amiga.  I had
been running SLIP @ 115Kbps to a 486 which was on our LAN where the 
print server is an RS/6K 530H (packet forwarding was trouble, because
IBM's TCP/IP for DOS has an undocumented flag in a config file which 
must be changed before it will forward IP packets).  I have W. Richard
Stevens excellent book - UNIX NETWORK PROGRAMMING, as well as my most
referenced volume, Stevens' ADVANCED PROGRAMMING IN THE UNIX ENVIRONMENT.
I basically followed his lpr client he outlines in, I believe Chap. 11.
I too received the same message from the lpd - "malformed from address".
I was going to look into it with more detail at iptraces done on port
515, comparing the difference between the packets sent by IBM's lpr
client and mine, but....  What I cannot understand is what permissions
have to do with the client;  after all, there are not such things as
permissions on an Amiga - and those IP packets could come from anywhere.

	Anyways, that was several months ago.  Still, if anyone knows
the condition under which lpd responds with "malformed from address",
please let me know.

	BTW:  there was an entry in /etc/hosts.lpd on the RS/6K

	Mike Mascari (mascari@cis.ohio-state.edu)




-----------[000330][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 14:55:38 GMT
From:      dougm@delphi.com (Doug McPherson)
To:        comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic


I've been able to use RMON tools to meaure the traffic on my network segments, 
and I can tell that TCP/IP is using n% of my traffic.  What I *can't*
tell from these tools is *which* TCP/IP applications are consuming that n %?!
I.e. I'd like to be able to break the TCP/IP traffic down into
source/destination groupings, based on the TCP/IP application (e.g.
telnet, ftp, HTTP,Doom, etc).

Are there tools out there than can "massage" this data out of my RMON probes or
do I need to use yet another application to gather this data?

I'm currently looking at NNstat to gather the data.  It's free, it runs on my 
Alpha systems, but it's pretty "low to the ground".   If there are
similar applications out there that will let me analyze multiple
segments of TCP/IP traffic, and are easier to install/configure than
NNstat, I'd very much like to
know.

"Off the rack" applications would be preferred.

Also I don't get to read news as much as I would like, so if you can
follow up in email, that'd be great.  When I get a chance, I'll post a
summary of reponses back here.

Thanks in advance and regards!

/doug

--
 +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
 | Doug McPherson                       Delphi Internet Services   |
 | Email: dougm@delphi.com              1030 Massachusetts Avenue  |
 | Phone: (617) 441-4565                Cambridge, MA 02138        |
 | FAX: (617) 491-6642                                             |
 +-----------------------------------------------------------------+

-----------[000331][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 15:07:34 GMT
From:      summit@ix.netcom.com (Summit '94)
To:        comp.dcom.lans.misc,comp.dcom.lans.token-ring,comp.dcom.servers,comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.sys.wellfleet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.org.usenix,comp.org.decus,comp.unix.solaris,comp.unix.ultrix
Subject:   Enterprise Management Summit '94 - Summit Week

The Enterprise Management Summit '94 has begun! Here is a summary of the
activities for the conference and exhibition which runs November 14-18 at 
the Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, California. 

Exhibit Floor
-------------------
Tuesday, 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Wednesday, 12:00pm - 7:00pm
Thursday, 12:00pm - 7:00pm

Vendor Shoot-Out
--------------------------
Bull, Computer Associates, DEC, HP, and IBM will compete head-to-head in
the Enterprise Management Theater on Wednesday and Thursday to see who has
the best enterprise management solution.
HP: Wednesday, 10:30am - 12:00pm
CA: Wednesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm
IBM: Thursday, 10:30am - 12:00pm
Bull: Thursday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm
DEC: Thursday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm

Keynotes, General Session
-----------------------------------
Wednesday, 8:30am: "Evolution of Management Platforms", Dennis Yaro, 
	SunSoft
Thursday, 8:30am: "Facing Today's Enterprise Management Challenges",
	Bill Warner, IBM
Friday, 12:45pm: "What Users Want; What Vendors Can Deliver", Panel

Other Activities
-----------------------
Tutorials (10): Monday-Tuesday
Technical Sessions (36): Wednesday-Friday
Product Directions Sessions (14): Wednesday-Friday

For More Information:
--------------------------------
During Summit week, you can reach us at the Santa Clara Convention Center, 
408-748-7117, 7114 
Or call the San Francisco office,  800-340-2111
Fax: 415-512-1325

-- End --

-----------[000332][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 14:02:55 +0100
From:      teisa@beatles.cselt.stet.it (Claudio Teisa)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Routing procedures inside hosts

dear all,
 I am trying to understand the routing mechanism in Internet, there are a 
 couple of questions (at least for the moment) I have not been able to answer.

1) What happens when two hosts with different {netid, subnetid} but 
   interconnected on the same physical network whishes to communicate?
   What is consulted first (or at all), the ARP table or the routing table?
   I.e. is the ARP protocol used when the IP address of the destination 
        indicates a different network?
	If yes, is it the router to answer the broadcast ARP request?
	If no and no route has been manually configured, neither explicit 
        nor default, is the packet discarded?

2) What happens when two host with the same {netid, subnet} but interconnected
   with two different physical network (connected by a router of course) wishes
   to communicate?
   Looking at its ARP tables, the routed should have the possibility to find 
   out on what of the two phisycal networks it is interconnected the 
   destination IP address, but "is it its task to do this work?" or simply 
   this configuration should be avoided (easily using different subnetid) at 
   all to avoid confusion in the routing tables?


 Thanks,
                                          C. Teisa
 
 teisa@beatles.cselt.stet.it


-----------[000333][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 16:01:34 GMT
From:      wiley@lilly.com (Michael S. Wiley)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   DHCP as part of IPv6?

Could anyone tell me if DHCP will be part of IPv6?  Or is it too early to 
know?  Our company is considering migrating to DHCP, but if IPv6 is going to 
offer a different method of dynamically configuring network parameters for 
client workstations then we may want to wait.  Any information would be 
appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Mike Wiley
wiley@lilly.com

-----------[000334][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 94 00:39:31 -0500
From:      rkm!rick (Rick McCalla)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   need to hide other machines


We have a network installed that has several workstations (Dos/Windows), a couple of novell
servers, a SCO Unix server and a SCO Xenix server.  All the systems talk TCP/IP.

The SCO Unix box is our connection to the outside world - both for dial in and dial-out. All 
machines on the network have to be able to talk to the SCO Unix box.

The problem is to prevent someone who dials into the SCO Unix box via a modem connection from 
seeing or talking to any other machine on the network.  Originally I did this by simply removing
the rlogin and telnet programs but some of the users have found that if they port other versions
of these programs over from other systems they can get net access - oh well - it was too simple
anyway ;-(

Does anyone know of a way we can accomplish this goal of preventing anyone from initiating a 
rlogin or telnet session from the SCO Unix box ?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Comspec Communications Inc.  |            Rick McCalla
Toronto, Ontario             |          rick@comspec.com
Voice : (416) 785-3553  #302 | Compuserve "INTERNET:rick@comspec.com"
Fax   : (416) 785-3668       |    ..<uunet.ca,gts,lethe,lsuc>..


-----------[000335][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 16:42:50 GMT
From:      ElamLE@LFWC.Lockheed.Com (Len E. Elam)
To:        comp.protocols.nfs,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   PC-NFS 5.0 Telnet & TelnetW ^S/^Q question

I'm using PC-NFS 5.0's Telnet and TelnetW (MS Windows Telnet) and, so
far, have not been able to figure out how set it up to NOT use ^S and
^Q for software handshaking.

If I could figure what to put in the TNINIT.ECF and TNWINIT.ECF files
to keep ^S from acting as the HOLD key, I suspect that would take care
of the problem.

And PC-NFS 5.0 didn't come with enough information on programming
Telnet and TelnetW command files for me to be able to figure it out
yet.

Therefore, I'm asking if anyone out there can give me a hand.  If the
information is in a FAQ somewhere, a pointer to it will be enough.

Thanks for your help,
Len E. Elam
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Len E. Elam                      | Since I am not an official Lockheed
 Lockheed Fort Worth Company      | spokesperson, these opinions contain
 PO Box 748, MZ5904               | no spokes.
 Fort Worth, TX 76101-0748        | 
 (817)763-2970                    | 
 ElamLE@LFWC.Lockheed.Com         | 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000336][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 17:41:16 GMT
From:      larry@eco.twg.com (Lawrence B. Henry III)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP extensions


In article <39t7or$4pf@pheidippides.axion.bt.co.uk>, robs@goofy (rob spencer) writes:
|>
|>Can anyone out there suggest which workstations implement RFC1323
|>which includes extended TCP window sizes and selective
|>retransmissions.
|>

Wollongong supports scaled windows in their VMS product; I believe that
UCX also supports scaled windows. So in answer to your question VMS 
workstations support at least the scaled windows part of RFC1323.

-Larry.
The Wollongong Group.


-----------[000337][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 17:49:36 GMT
From:      danny@chaps.wimsey.com (Danny Aldham)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: FAQ please

Interface Builders (72160.1106@CompuServe.COM) wrote:
: If there is a FAQ for this newsgroup, could someone please send a copy
: of it to the Compuserve address below?
 
: Thanks
: -- 
: Lee Chubb -- Interface Builders -- 72160.1106@compuserve.com

Please post them here or send a copy to me too. Thanks

       Danny Aldham -- Technical Support Manager
                   Chaps Group Inc.
              SCO Advanced Product Center
	Phone (604) 528-6000 Fax (604) 528-6090

-----------[000338][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 18:11:04 GMT
From:      zhebu@svusenet.ubs.ch
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   9-bit-bytes and tcp


I have a program which uses tcp stream communication on several very different
types of computers. To transport binary data I use the tcp/ip format, using
ntoh.. hton.. functions. (big endian octets).

My question is, how the abstraction of a tcp-connection is supposed to handle 
9-bit bytes. A 4-byte integer is 36 bits on that machines.

My guess is, that the highest bit in each byte is ignored. Badly enough, the 
ntoh.. and hton.. functions do not exist on the 9-bit-machine. If my guess is 
correct, I can implement them that way (ignore the highest bit of each byte, 
let the compiler do the local byte-ordering):

long ntohl(long x)
{
    unsigned char *s = (unsigned char *)&x;
    return s[3]+s[2]*0x100+s[1]*0x10000+s[0]*0x1000000;
}

long htonl(long x)
{
    long rw;
    unsigned char *s=(unsigned char *)&rw;

    s[3] = x%0x100;
    s[2]=x/0x100%0x100;
    s[1]=x/0x10000%0x100;
    s[0]=x/0x1000000%0x100;
    return rw;
}

--
NAME   Urs Eberle
EMAIL  urs.eberle@zhflur.ubs.ubs.ch
PHONE  ++41-1-236-58-08

-----------[000339][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 19:06:25 GMT
From:      kotopo@ivev.bau.tu-bs.de (Alexander Kotopoulis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Comfortable talk clients ?

Hi,

Are there more comfortable talk clients out for UNIX, more than
talk and ytalk. I'm especially interested in answering a talk
request more comfortably. Is there something like an xbiff for talk?

Please tell me if there is a more appropriate newsgroup for talk
issues.

Yo, alex :-)


--
#####################################################################
Alexander Kotopoulis               ###     kotopo@ivev.bau.tu-bs.de
Institut fuer Verkehr, Eisenbahn-  ###     i5072204@ws.rz.tu-bs.de
wesen und Verkehrssicherung        ### 
TU Braunschweig                    ###
#####################################################################

-----------[000340][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 19:31:33 GMT
From:      jmatkins@quads.uchicago.edu (Jonny A (Voltron))
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,alt.winsock,comp.protocols.tcp-
Subject:   Re: Winsock Application FAQ - Updated !

In article <1994Nov14.055642.32706@cc.usu.edu>, slhd5@cc.usu.edu says:
>
>Jeff while Netscaping <jeff@econ.berkeley.edu> writes:
>
>>
>>> >
>>> >Try:  http://www.LCS.com/faqhtml.html
>>>
>>> YES!!!!!   Thank you very much for moving it!!!
>>
>>NO!!!!   I can not connect to this host!!!
>>
>Me either!!!!   AAAGGHHHH!!!!!!!!!!

In the meantime, to get basic apps, try mine:
http://ariel.rh.uchicago.edu/home.html
But keep in mind that this page is under construction and modified very
frequently. Also, it offers MUCH less than the LCS page (a link to this
will be provided soon, if Craig Larsen doesn't mind). But, noone has re-
ported problems connecting just yet, and it will soon be much more organ-
ized. In the works: a page offering BMG Music Service's entire catalog.
                                          -Jon.
--
                 WILL BUILD WWW PAGES FOR FOOD
"Celebrating over 96 straight hours of The Little Mermaid soundtrack"
--> jmatkins@quads.uchicago.edu  | j-atkinson@uchicago.edu
http://ariel.rh.uchicago.edu/home.html

-----------[000341][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 19:48:41 GMT
From:      John Veizades <veizades@ftp.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: DHCP as part of IPv6?

> Could anyone tell me if DHCP will be part of IPv6?  Or is it too early to 
> know?  Our company is considering migrating to DHCP, but if IPv6 is going to 
> offer a different method of dynamically configuring network parameters for 
> client workstations then we may want to wait.  Any information would be 
> appreciated.
Much of the work on address configuration in IPv6 is still very much up in the air but it seems
that several models of address configuration seem to be emerging.

The first is based on a hosts IEEE address (also known as your ethernet
address).  This will allow for the creation of a local use address, an
address that does not route and allows for comunication with other
local hosts.  This has been oftened referred to as the dentist office
senario, a group a hosts that want to communicate with one an other
without being connected to a global network.

The second is a stateless server based configuration in which a local
address server using the networks identifier and the hosts local
identifier forms a global use address.

Finally there is a statefull server much like DHCP which works much like
the current DHCP servers.

If you are further interested in this topic try the mailing list which
is discussing this topic (addrconf@cisco.com).

John Veizades...
Engineering Manager Server Technologies
FTP Software's (soon to be closed) West Coast Office


-----------[000342][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 19:56:26 GMT
From:      tim@moeller.com (Timothy Kulig)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   More detailed 4 you

I Cannot reach my HP 9000/832 from my Winsock station.
I have tested every aspect of my configuration to ensure that I
have set this up correctly. Hardware, software, cabling, everything!!!

I can telnet to my HP from my Chameleon machine, Linux box, ATS, you name it,
just not my Winsock systems!!

First HARDWARE, here's my whole setup of the hardware in question in a snap:


  92.92.92.92     92.92.92.99                                92.92.92.104
  ___________       _______                                _______
  |         |       |     |                                |     | __________
  |         |       |     |                                |     | |Winsock |
  |   HP    |       |_____|       10BaseT/BNC      NOVELL  |     | |   PC   |
  |  9000   |    _____| |_____    Concentrator      3.12   | PC  | |        |
  |  /832   |    |   LINUX   |      _______          |     |     | |________|
  |_________|    |___________|      |_____|          |     |_____|   _|  |_
       |               |             |  | |__________|        |
       +---------------+-------------+  |_____________________|
             BNC Ethernet Network              10BaseT


From my Linux machine [92.92.92.99]
(If I do a: route add -host IP_ADDRESS_OF_WINSOCK_MACHINE in this case 
92.92.92.104) I can ping my Winsock station, and then even telnet TO my 
Linux box FROM my Winsock Station. (I can even use PINGW.EXE to ping my 
Linux Machine from the Winsock Station.) I have to do the route command 
first on my Linux side. Well the problem I'm having is that I cannot 
PINGW or Telnet or really do anything with my HP. No matter what I try I 
can't access my HP from the Winsock station. Both subnet masks are 
255.255.255.0, I can do a route add host IP_ADDRESS_OF_WINSOCK_MACHINE on 
my HP, and still NOTHING!! What is it I'm doing wrong???

Here's what I'm doing on my Winsock Station's AUTOEXEC.BAT:

LSL
(CARD DRIVER)
IPXODI
ODIPKT 0	(Version 3.0)
WINPKT 0x69
NETX		(Latest Version)

Here is a copy of my NET.CFG:

Link Support 
        Buffers 4 1600

Link Driver [NETWORK CARD DRIVER]
	Frame Ethernet_II
	Frame Ethernet_802.3
	PROTOCOL IPX 0 ETHERNET_802.3
	Protocol IP 000000000800 ETHERNET_II
	Protocol ARP 000000000806 ETHERNET_II

I can login to my Novell Network, and I can access my Linux box,
so why can't I access my HP 9000/832? It's running Version 9.0 of HP-UX.
For your Information on the same box I install Chameleon V4.7 and it 
worked with me ___WITHOUT____ having to do a:
route add -host IP_ADDRESS_OF_WINSOCK_MACHINE, on the Linux Box and
I could easily ping, telnet, mail, anything to my HP 9000/832.
It worked like a dream. So what the heck could be wrong with MY setup 
with WINSOCK??? I'm using version 2.0B of Winsock. P.S. It will not "Run 
Minimized" correctly. (Only if your just starting windows will it run 
minimized). Also I'm running Dos 6.22 on this Winsock Station.

Whenever I do a PINGW from the Winsock station I get a: ICMP transmit Error
with PingW, but, when I do a TRACE/ARP on my TCPMAN side while I PINGW I get:

ARP 1 0001 0800 00:00:C0:E6:A6:54:92.92.92.103 ->00:00:00:00:00:00:92.92.92.92
ARP timed out
ARP 1 0001 0800 00:00:C0:E6:A6:54:92.92.92.103 ->00:00:00:00:00:00:92.92.92.92
ARP timed out
ARP 1 0001 0800 00:00:C0:E6:A6:54:92.92.92.103 ->00:00:00:00:00:00:92.92.92.92
ARP timed out
ARP 1 0001 0800 00:00:C0:E6:A6:54:92.92.92.103 ->00:00:00:00:00:00:92.92.92.92
ARP timed out
ARP 1 0001 0800 00:00:C0:E6:A6:54:92.92.92.103 ->00:00:00:00:00:00:92.92.92.92
ARP timed out
ARP 1 0001 0800 00:00:C0:E6:A6:54:92.92.92.103 ->00:00:00:00:00:00:92.92.92.92
ARP timed out

Yet I can ping to other Winsock Systems and I can Ping to my Linux box!!
The big Kicker is this, I can install Chameleon on the same machine, and it
will work, first time, NO PROBLEMS, NOT ONE!!! So what am I doing wrong???

Every machine I setup with Winsock has this same problem, and if I install
Chameleon on that machine again, it works PERFECT!!!

I would believe that I don't have the right protocol selected with
ODIPKT, but I can PINGW my Linux box, and other Winsock machines,
so that does'nt compute!! (For all you Lost in Space fans!!)

This is complex and I believe above my head......

Anyone out there the best of the best in TCP/WINSOCK?????

Anything else you need to know, just mail me!! Hell I'll send pictures!!

Please help me.

THANX.

--
 ============================================================================
    __&__     |
   /     \    |   Timothy Alan Kulig  tim@systel.com or tkulig@ic.net
  |       |   |
  |  (o)(o)   |   M O E L L E R Mfg  Unix Windows Dos Vax - You name it!
 C   .---_)  |
   | |.___|   |   If you need anything in the Unix World, Feel Free to call!
   |  \__/    |
   /_____\    |   (810) 960-3999   Home: (810) 960-9783   Fax: (810) 960-3899
  /_____/ \   |
 /         \  |   Homer Simpson is my Idol.  MMMMM Fuzzy Grape!!
 ============================================================================

-----------[000343][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 20:31:49 GMT
From:      Leo Smith <leo@elmail.co.uk>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.mail.sendmail
Subject:   Re: DNS problems


In article <pnta-131194205547@134.174.141.199>, <pnta@warren.med.harvard.edu> 
writes:

> Hi,
> I'm sorry if this is the wrong group for my DNS question.  
> My DNS server is repeating this error message every 3-5 mins.:
> 
> named[4924] : Malformed response from xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
> 
> The xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the primary DNS server and mine is a secondary. 
> Addresses are still being resolved, but just wondering what is causing this
> errors.
> 

May be that the zone transfer is failing.

Possibly some bad records - we have seen this sort of problem with Hinfo 
records with just one, rather than two strings. There is a named-xfer program 
that can be used to get more detail I believe

> Also, will appreciated if I can be pointed to a DNS specific group.
> 

comp.protocols.tcp-ip is my best guess
> Thanks 
> 
> -patrick
> 
>  


-----------[000344][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      15 Nov 1994 20:36:33 GMT
From:      jfroissart@andersen.com (Jean-Louis Froissart)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Real Time Voice Processing over the Internet

I am working on some real time voice transmission over the Internet.
Does anyone know about any API for windows or mac that would have been developped
for that purpose ? Is there any code available on the Internet that would have 
that functionality ?

Thanks for helping me, 

Jean-Louis Froissart
Andersen Consulting / Center for Strategic Technology Research (CSTaR)
100 South Wacker
Chicago IL 60606

-----------[000345][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 21:25:34 GMT
From:      dsanoy@netcom.com (Darwin Sanoy)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Me too.


I am also very interested in any information sources on subnetting.  Most 
examples I have seen show the subnetting of a class B address, yet the 
reality for most of us (me included) is a C address.
I am specifically looking for sources of information on subnetting class 
C addresses.
djs.
-- 
                                                         __
                                                        / / __
                                                     __/ / /_/ ____
                                                    /   / __  / __/
  Darwin Sanoy                                     / / / / / /_  /
  ______________________________________________  /___/ / / /___/
                             dsanoy@netcom.com       __/ /
                       70324.25@compuserve.com      /___/

-----------[000346][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 15 Nov 1994 21:33:10 GMT
From:      cpstone@nickel.ucs.indiana.edu (The Scorpion)
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows,comp.protocol.appletalk,comp.protocol.tcp-ip,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.networking,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Re: PC <----> MAC Linking

In article <39r796$a54@ipgate.le.ac.uk>, G.G. Owenson <ggo1@le.ac.uk> wrote:
>Is it possible to link in some way a Mac (performa 475) and a PC (386)
>directly using an ethernet network?
>
In a word, yes.

Farallon's PhoneNET software allows for a PC to use AppleTalk file sharing,
using a remote Mac as the server (or even more than one!).  The only draw
back is that you can't access the PC from the MAC.  I have both a PC and
a Mac on my desktop, and I have found this tool to be instespensible.  Altho
PhoneNET is most noted for the Mac hardware system, the PC version allows 
the PC to be configured to use an Ethernet card for the file-sharing.

The software is bundled with Timbuktu for Windows.

As for sharing a printer:  I have the same problem (my only printer is
connected to my PC), and have yet to find a workable solution.  The easiest
thing to do may be to attach the printer to one of your Mac, if one of
them has a serial port open (mine doesn't), altho that will require an adapter.

Hope this helps a bit!

      -Christopher P. Stone
 	  Network Manager
Indiana University Real Estate Dept.



-----------[000347][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 02:28:55 GMT
From:      rajeshk@bright.research.otc.com.au (Rajesh Kumar)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   RFC:1323 or RFC:1072



Hi Netters,

We are planning to use a TCP level protocol for High Speed Communication.

We have come across a few RFCs such as RFC:1323, RFC:1072 proposed by
Jacobson and Braden. These RFCs provide an extension to TCP by
proposing new TCP options for scaled windows, selective
acknowledgments and round-trip timing, in order to provide efficient
operation over large-bandwidth*delay-product paths.

If anyone knows about any vendor who has implemented any of these
RFCs or such types of RFCs, and provides a commercial product, please send me a email.

Thanks in advance.

 
Regards

Rajesh Kumar
rajeshk@research.otc.com.au




-----------[000348][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 02:47:54 GMT
From:      snielsen@amiserv.xnet.com (Steven Nielsen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   lpr client ... HELP!

Hi.

I have a berkley style printer daemon running on my PC using the
trumpet tcp/ip stack. I *want* to be able to print to my PC's printer
from my unix shell account (a BSD system). I don't have root access to this
machine and the administator is unwilling to give me a printcap entry which 
allow me to use the standard lpr command (not to mention everyone else!)
So I had to find an lpr client that would allow me to specify 
a remote host to print to (my machine! :) ) instead of a remote print queue. 
After some searching I found W. Richard Stevens' lpr client. I got it to 
compile but when running it got the following error message:

	"mylpr: error, server returned: Malformed 'from' address"

After some investigation (on a different machine on which I had root access)
I found out that the "mylpr" program had to be owned by root and have
it's setuid bit on in order for it to work.

I would *prefer* to get the lpr client working without "root" intervention.

Any suggestions on what to do next? 

Any help is appreciated,
Steve Nielsen
snielsen@xnet.com

-----------[000349][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 02:49:16 GMT
From:      snielsen@amiserv.xnet.com (Steven Nielsen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   lpr client ... HELP!

Hi.

I have a berkley style printer daemon running on my PC using the
trumpet tcp/ip stack. I *want* to be able to print to my PC's printer
from my unix shell account (a BSD system). I don't have root access to this
machine and the administator is unwilling to give me a printcap entry which 
would allow me to use the standard lpr command (not to mention everyone else!)
So I had to find an lpr client that would allow me to specify 
a remote host to print to (my machine! :) ) instead of a remote print queue. 
After some searching I found W. Richard Stevens' lpr client. I got it to 
compile but when running it got the following error message:

	"mylpr: error, server returned: Malformed 'from' address"

After some investigation (on a different machine on which I had root access)
I found out that the "mylpr" program had to be owned by root and have
it's setuid bit on in order for it to work.

I would *prefer* to get the lpr client working without "root" intervention.

Any suggestions on what to do next? 

Any help is appreciated,
Steve Nielsen
snielsen@xnet.com

-----------[000350][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 03:16:17 GMT
From:      lorraine@snrc.uow.edu.au (Lorraine de Vere)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Capabilities of IP routers, ATM switches and Interworking Units

At the moment I am trying to build a simulation model that involves the 
interconnection of ATM networks running TCP/IP and IP subnets that are 
not deployed above ATM networks.

I was wondering if someone could tell me, or suggest where I can find out 
about the capabilities of IP routers, ATM switches and Interworking Units.
I'm interested in figures such as how many datagrams can be forwarded per 
second, how many cells can be switched per second, how much buffering is 
provided, how many interfaces routers tend to have and so on.  In terms of 
routers  I realise that they range from very grunty specialised boxes to PCs -
information about the broad spectrum of PC capabilities would be great.  Also,
does anyone know what the typical bit rates of existing Internet backbones are.

Finally, if anyone knows of any papers discussing the interconnection of ATM 
networks and non ATM IP subnets, any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

Replies to this group or email are both fine for me.  I can also summarise
responses if people are interested.

Thanks a lot

Lorraine de Vere (lorraine@snrc.uow.edu.au)


-----------[000351][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 03:34:18 GMT
From:      mikej@thepoint.com (Michae Jung)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: DHCP help!!

In article <39uh91$sp2@ra.nrl.navy.mil>, atkinson@sundance.itd.nrl.navy.mil (Ran Atkinson) says:
>
>In article <39tt5m$akv@chnews.intel.com> kirkwood@strider.fm.intel.com (Clayton Kirkwood) writes:
>>Hi, I am trying to find source for DHCP. I have seen various other requests 
>>recently which didn't appear to be answered. I have also heard a rumor that 
>>the source was pulled back because there was a "bug", but this seems unusual.
>
>To my knowledge there is no freely distributable implementation of
>DHCP.  If one does exist, I too would be interested in knowing of it.
>There are freely distributable implementations of BOOTP which would be
>a good basis for building a DHCP implementation.
>
>WHO do you think has worked on a freely distributable DHCP implementation ?
>
>Ran
>atkinson@itd.nrl.navy.mil
>


I can only speak of the rumors thought the grape-vine but Microsoft
implementation of DHCP is a slightly modified version of CISCO's
Dynamic IP allocation...

There are some fairly good docs on:
/pub/microsoft/bussys/winnt/winnt-docs/papers that describe how Microsoft
has implemented the features.  I would also think one could make 
inquiries to CISCO as to how that have handled Dynamic IP allocation and
renewal.

I have just started using DHCP/WINSERV and have not formed any conclusive
thoughts as to how Microsoft has implemented it, but overall it looks
very promissing.

I don't think source-code will ever be available from Microsoft, but
possible lower level call might be able to be obtained from Cisco.

No Warrenties, No Gurarentee.......

mikej@thepoint.com

p.s. If you find anything of interest, I would appreciate a email 
of what you have found.....

mike



-----------[000352][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 04:08:43 GMT
From:      loiselle@charm.gandalf.ca (Vance Loiselle)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Class C subnetting



That's just what I was looking for. I'd like to further the
question.
From what's been discussed, if an organization has one class c
net of 199.99.166.X and wishes to subnet further, the mask of
255.255.255.192 provides them with two subnets, 62 hosts each.
Ques: Would a mask of 255.255.255.128 be useless? No allowable
subnet values?

Now, what if instead the organization was given a single subnetted
class b address, say 134.87.207.X with a mask of 255.255.255.0
To increase subnets, if the mask of 255.255.255.192 was applied to
this, would the number of subnets be 4 instead of 2? Also, would
a mask of 255.255.255.128 now be ok, and provide 2 usable subnets?
I can't figure out if the fact that the base net number is class b
changes these issues.
Thanx,
Vance Loiselle
Gandalf Technologies Inc.


-----------[000353][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 05:08:59 GMT
From:      zhu@gaul.csd.uwo.ca (ZHENJUN ZHU)
To:        comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic

In article <3aai5a$1ab@news2.delphi.com>,
Doug McPherson <dougm@delphi.com> wrote:
>
>I'm currently looking at NNstat to gather the data.  It's free, it runs on my 
Could you e-mail me about how to obtain NNstat? Or post it here. Thanks.

- Zhenjun Zhu
  University of Western Ontario, London, Canada










>
>/doug
>



-----------[000354][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 05:25:48 GMT
From:      samg@netcom.com (Sam Ghandchi)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,soc.culture.iranian
Subject:   Re: Real Time Voice Processing over the Internet

Pete Resnick (resnick@uiuc.edu) wrote:
: In article <3ab64h$aec@grant.cstar.andersen.com>, jfroissart@andersen.com
: (Jean-Louis Froissart) wrote:
 
: > I am working on some real time voice transmission over the Internet.
: > Does anyone know about any API for windows or mac that would have been
 developped
: > for that purpose ? Is there any code available on the Internet that
 would have 
: > that functionality ?
 
: For the Macintosh, there is a program called Maven that is being worked on
: here at the University of Illinois. The author of the program is Charley
: Kline (kline@uiuc.edu) and currently his graduate assistant who is working
: on the code is Eric Scouten (scouten@uiuc.edu).
 
: pr
: -- 
: Pete Resnick    (...so what is a mojo, and why would one be rising?)
: Doctoral Student - Philosophy Department, Gregory Hall, UIUC
: System manager - Cognitive Science Group, Beckman Institute, UIUC
: Internet: resnick@uiuc.edu

is this multimedia or just voice?

TIA,
- SG

-----------[000355][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 05:59:05 GMT
From:      mgleason@cse.unl.edu (Mike Gleason)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sources.d
Subject:   New archive site for NcFTP.

Our system administrator wants me to move ncftp off of cse.unl.edu to
reduce the load on that machine.  The new site to get the latest version
of ncftp (as well as public betas of version 2) is:

	ftp.cs.unl.edu
	in the directory: /pub/ncftp

For now, there is no restriction of when you can call.  But be reasonable :-)

I've also posted a new beta, 2.0b4 for testing:
    ftp://ftp.cs.unl.edu/pub/ncftp/BETA/ncftp2b04.tgz

--
===== Mike Gleason <mgleason@cse.unl.edu> ================= Go Huskers! =======
Current version of NcFTP is 1.8.6, and is available from FTP.CS.UNL.EDU, in the
/pub/ncftp directory.  Pre-release versions of NcFTP 2.0.0 are available in the /pub/ncftp/BETA directory.

-----------[000356][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 08:24:04
From:      ricard@axis.se (Ricard Wolf)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: DHCP as part of IPv6?

In article <wiley.6.2EC8DB5E@lilly.com> wiley@lilly.com (Michael S. Wiley) writes:
>Subject: DHCP as part of IPv6?
>From: wiley@lilly.com (Michael S. Wiley)
>Date: Tue, 15 Nov 1994 16:01:34 GMT
>Keywords: DHCP
 
>Could anyone tell me if DHCP will be part of IPv6?  Or is it too early to 
>know?  Our company is considering migrating to DHCP, but if IPv6 is going to 
>offer a different method of dynamically configuring network parameters for 
>client workstations then we may want to wait.  Any information would be 
>appreciated.

I don't think IPv6 takes a stand on DHCP or not, after all, DHCP has nothing 
to do with IP really. Protocols will have to adjust to IPv6, this includes 
DHCP.

/Ricard

--
Ricard Wolf                   / | \  / | /-           email: ricard@axis.se
Axis Communications AB       /__|  \/  | \__          uucp:  axisab.se!ricard
S-223 70 LUND               /   |  /\  |    \         Tel:   +46 46 19 18 63
SWEDEN                     /    | /  \ | \__/         Fax:   +46 46 13 61 30

-----------[000357][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 08:07:43 GMT
From:      shai@shekel.jct.ac.il (Shai Fultheim-System Assistant)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   How to find all servers on net (RPC)??

Hi all,
For finding all the servers on the net i use broadcast:
to brodcast to all servers on the net i use this (in the client):

  clnt_stat = clnt_broadcast(PTOUIDPROG,PTOUIDVERS,VER_NUM,xdr_void,0,
			     xdr_void,0,eachresult);

where eachresult is:

int eachresult(char *out, struct sockaddr_in *addr)
{
  printf("caught: %s\n",inet_ntoa(addr->sin_addr));
  return 0;
}

i want to get all the servers printed on screen (or inserted into array),
but the problem is that this above is infinite loop. if i'll change it to
return 1; it will exit after the first answer caugth.
ho to get all the servers and then exit (i want each server will be only
one time in the list !!).

		** PLEASE ANSWER ONLY BY E-MAIL **

--
Shai Fultheim    				E-mail: shai@shekel.jct.ac.il
System Assistant				Tel (W):       (972)-2-751160
Jerusalem College of Technology - Israel	Tel (H):       (972)-2-963476

-----------[000358][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 94 15:36:20 -0400
From:      Frank.Smyth@Dal.Ca (Frank Smyth)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Lpr/Lpd for a PC


I want to be able to send output from a PC on an ethernet
backbone to another PC with an attached printer. I could 
do this with netware or Windows for Workgroups, but I wanted 
to know if there is an lpd/lpr setup that would work on a 
PC with a TCP stack running (LanWorkplace in our case). I don't 
want to have to send a file, as a typical Lpr might do, but 
"capture" output as netware does. Any ideas?

----------------------------------------
Frank Smyth
Assistant Director
Academic Computing Services
Dalhousie University, Hfx. N.S.
Frank.Smyth@Dal.Ca
----------------------------------------

-----------[000359][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 11:03:33
From:      ace@iesl.forth.gr (Andreas C. Enotiadis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   IP network simulator

Hello everyone,

I'm looking for an IP network simulator that will allow me to play around with 
possible combinations of a reasonably large network that we are currently 
designing to figure out if and how it will work.

Any ideas?

Andreas

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Andreas C. Enotiadis
Internetwork Ltd
"My views DEFINITELY represent those of InterNetwork Ltd - It's mine dammit!"
ace@ics.forth.gr
ace@iesl.forth.gr
ace@praxis.forth.gr
Snail-Mail :7 Fokidos Str, 11526 Athens, Greece. Tel : 7486222-3, Fax 7486223
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000360][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 12:34:05 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: RFC:1323 or RFC:1072

>We are planning to use a TCP level protocol for High Speed Communication.
>We have come across a few RFCs such as RFC:1323, RFC:1072 proposed by
>Jacobson and Braden. These RFCs provide an extension to TCP by
>proposing new TCP options for scaled windows, selective
>acknowledgments and round-trip timing, in order to provide efficient
>operation over large-bandwidth*delay-product paths.
>
>If anyone knows about any vendor who has implemented any of these
>RFCs or such types of RFCs, and provides a commercial product, please send me a email.

First take a look at the RFCs.  Note on 1323 that it "obsoletes" 1072
and 1185.  Yes, RFC 1323 support is for real.  Numerous vendors support
it, and as I recall, someone posted that exact question about a week ago
and responses have been posted.  There are also freely available
implementations of the window scale and timestamp options (notably
the one in 4.4BSD-Lite).

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000361][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 12:37:50 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Local echoing for Telnet protocol

In article <7535231084001@gcomm.com>, stein@gcomm.com writes:
|> 
|> IC>In article <39rh3o$j54@charm.magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu>,
|> IC>prabau@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu (Patrick F Rabau) writes:
|> IC>[...]
|> IC>|>     telnet> mode line
|> IC>|> 1   SENT dont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD
|> IC>|> 2   SENT dont ECHO
|> IC>|> 3   RCVD wont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD (don't reply)
|> IC>|> 4   RCVD will ECHO (reply)
|> IC>|> 5   SENT do ECHO (reply)
|> IC>|>
|> IC>|> Isn't this a violation of the telnet protocol? [...]
|> 
|> IC>Absolutely.  A telnet implementation must always accept DONT and WONT,
|> IC>and must always default to all options off (NVT mode).
|> 
|> Not necessarily.  I assume the issue here is that line 4 appears to
|> illegally contradict line 2?  This report of telnet option negotiation is
|> wholly from the client's perspective, and the server might very well
|> have legitimately sent the "will ECHO" (4) immediately upon connect,
|> before it received the client's "dont ECHO" (2).  The fact that the
|> client interpreted line 4 as a reply to line 2 is one of the boneheaded
|> facts of life of telnet option negotiation:  that replies and requests
|> aren't distinguishable except by context.

That's moderately true.  I made the simplifying assumption that this guy
isn't an amazing speed typist, and that the line was basically quiescent
when the "telnet> mode line" request was made, since that's usually an
awkward incantation to make.

If it were the case that either the "WILL ECHO" was sitting in an input
buffer while "mode line" was entered or that the "DONT ECHO" wasn't seen
by the peer before "WILL ECHO" was sent, then you're right and this is
somewhat ambiguous.  I would actually expect to see a loop develop in
that case (1 and 2 below are simultaneous):

1.	SENT dont ECHO
2.	RCVD will ECHO
3.	SENT do ECHO		(response to "will" at 2)
4.	RCVD wont ECHO		(response to "dont" at 1)
5.	SENT dont ECHO		(response to "wont" at 4)
6.	RCVD will ECHO		(response to "do" at 3)
7.	SENT do ECHO		(response to "will" at 6)
8.	RCVD wont ECHO		(response to "dont" at 5)
9.	SENT dont ECHO		(response to "wont" at 8)
10.	RCVD will ECHO		(response to "do" at 7)

(A reasonable system might choose to stop responding to excessive DOs,
though.)

However, if it is the case that the remote end is refusing to turn off
the remote echo option by replying "WILL ECHO" in response to "DONT
ECHO" (and that does seem to be the case here), then that remote device
is broken.  That's not a legal thing to do.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000362][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 12:41:12 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Class C subnetting

There was an excellent article in the CACM recently on subnetting a
Class C address using CIDR:

    %T Practical Considerations for Network Addressing Using CIDR
    %A H. Eidnes
    %J Communications of the ACM
    %V 37
    %N 8
    %P 46-53
    %D 1994
    %m Aug.

Someone pointed out a URL for an on-line copy, but I didn't save it.

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000363][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 12:59:27 GMT
From:      mark@belushi.ico.olivetti.com (Marco Caccia)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP extensions

 In article <39t7or$4pf@pheidippides.axion.bt.co.uk>, robs@goofy (rob spencer) writes:
|> 
|> Can anyone out there suggest which workstations implement RFC1323
|> which includes extended TCP window sizes and selective
|> retransmissions.
|>

Olivetti supports TCP Scale Options in their SVR40
product.

In this product is only implemented this option 
from RFC1323, but it is also implemented the
"fast retransmit fast recovery" algorithm proposed
by Van Jacobson.

-Marco
Olivetti


-----------[000364][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 13:01:45 GMT
From:      peter@reepicheep.logica.co.uk (Peter Whisker)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.os.ms-windows.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.setup,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,connect.audit
Subject:   Re: Can MS-Windows(3.11) use TCP/IP as THE ONLY transport protocol?

In article <Cz4900.64D@ibmpcug.co.uk> object@ibmpcug.co.uk (Ken Tough) writes:
>From: object@ibmpcug.co.uk (Ken Tough)
>Subject: Can MS-Windows(3.11) use TCP/IP as THE ONLY transport protocol?
>Date: Fri, 11 Nov 1994 18:35:56 GMT
 
>I would like to know if it is possible to use TCP/IP for the 
>"default ms-windows protocol" i.e) as the standard transport over which 
>all ms-windows communications takes place.  (For example, picture a
>network of WfWg machines where the only Ethernet packets are IP ones.

Yes. We use WfWg 3.11 and Microsoft TCP/IP (VXD) stack. This is available from 
ftp.microsoft.com.

Just install it according to the documentation and you can throw away NetBEUI, 
IPX etc.

I have even connected the Microsoft ftp server (gowinnt.microsoft.com) as a 
remote network drive from the file manager. So it works over 8,000 miles of 
Internet.

The product seems to be reasonably stable on this first proper release. All 
the facilities such as the browse lists work too. However, if you want to 
connect to machines over a router, you need to put their IP address and name 
in a file called c:\windows\lmhosts. This will eventually be superseded by 
WINS servers.

Peter

---
Peter Whisker                           WhiskerP@lgwct.logica.com
Logica UK Ltd,                              tel: +44 171 637 9111
Cobham, Surrey, UK                          fax: +44 1932 869 104
KT11 1HY                        "Opinions are mine, not Logica's"

-----------[000365][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 14:46:55 GMT
From:      fmeschbe@pax.eunet.ch (Meschberger)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Subnetting to be avoided ?

Hi,

I recently heard someone recomending not to use subnetting, i.e.
not to use a subnetz mask of 255.255.255.0 on a Class B address.

Is there some issue in that, or is it just hype ?

Thanks for your comments.


Felix

PS: Please DON'T start a flame war. I'm just interested in the pros
    and the cons.

=================================================================
this ain't a signature...
all opinions stated are my own, other standard disclaimers apply
COOP Schweiz, Systemtechnik      email: mefcs@coop.ch
Felix Meschberger                   or: CS-DEP2.MEFCS@mvs.coop.ch
Freidorf 151                     phone: ++41 (0)61 319 18 05
CH-4132 Muttenz                  fax  : ++41 (0)61 319 19 35
=================================================================

-----------[000366][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 15:37:18 GMT
From:      denis@apic.fr (Denis BOULAIS)
To:        comp.os.msdos.mail-news,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.procotols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.mail.misc
Subject:   Gateway between LANtastic and Unix E-Mail


I am looking for some kind of gateway between Unix and LANtastic V6.0
Exchange E-Mail. We do have some PCs on our network with LANtastic TCP,
but that does not provide any kind of mail forwarding automation.

I remember a little while back somebody saying he was looking into
writing something in Visual Basic to do just that.

I really do not mind if the gateway process runs on Unix or PCs, I just
PC and Unix users to send and receive stuff, using Unix as a gateway to
the Internet.

Thanks,
Denis

---
Denis Boulais                ||  Apic Systemes S.A.
Administrateur Systeme       ||  25, rue de Stalingrad
Tel : (33) (1) 49 60 90 90   ||  94110 ARCUEIL
Fax : (33) (1) 49 69 92 93   ||  FRANCE



-----------[000367][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 16:09:03 GMT
From:      lapp@waterloo.hp.com (David Lapp)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: DHCP help!!

Michae Jung (mikej@thepoint.com) wrote:
: In article <39uh91$sp2@ra.nrl.navy.mil>, atkinson@sundance.itd.nrl.navy.mil (Ran Atkinson) says:
: >
: >WHO do you think has worked on a freely distributable DHCP implementation ?
: >
 
: I can only speak of the rumors thought the grape-vine but Microsoft
: implementation of DHCP is a slightly modified version of CISCO's
: Dynamic IP allocation...

I suspect the folks at both Microsoft and Cisco will be surprised
to hear this :-)

The last I heard Microsoft's DHCP server was an implementation
based on RFC 1541 "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol".

I believe WINS is Microsofts own invention tho.

: There are some fairly good docs on:
: /pub/microsoft/bussys/winnt/winnt-docs/papers that describe how Microsoft
: has implemented the features.  I would also think one could make 
: inquiries to CISCO as to how that have handled Dynamic IP allocation and
: renewal.

I think that should be: ftp.microsoft.com:/bussys/winnt/winnt-docs/papers
These seem to be Microsoft Word documents.

Dave L.

Standard Disclaimer etc...

-----------[000368][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 00:50:55 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: lpr client ... HELP!

In article <3abrvc$9f6@flood.xnet.com> snielsen@amiserv.xnet.com (Steven Nielsen) writes:
]After some searching I found W. Richard Stevens' lpr client. I got it to 
]compile but when running it got the following error message:
]
]	"mylpr: error, server returned: Malformed 'from' address"
]
]After some investigation (on a different machine on which I had root access)
]I found out that the "mylpr" program had to be owned by root and have
]it's setuid bit on in order for it to work.

The LPR protocol specifies that the client's source port must be in the
range 512-1023.  On Unix, only the superuser can bind these "privileged"
ports.

There are several reasons why LPD requires the client to be privileged.
The protocol can be used to cancel queued print jobs, and you usually don't
want people to be able to cancel each other's jobs.  And if the site
charges uses for print jobs, allowing unprivileged LPR clients would allow
users to submit jobs with a different user's name.

Of course, these justifications are less significant if the site allows
PC's and other insecure machines to be LPR clients, since any user on these
can be a superuser.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000369][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 01:11:25 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Subnetting to be avoided ?

In article <CzD7q7.H4F@eunet.ch> fmeschbe@pax.eunet.ch (Meschberger) writes:
>I recently heard someone recomending not to use subnetting, i.e.
>not to use a subnetz mask of 255.255.255.0 on a Class B address.

I've never heard this.  In fact, I can't imagine many sites that have
enough machines to require a Class B network, but which shouldn't use
subnetting.

What did he recommend instead -- bridging?  I don't think that scales very
well to such a large network.

Perhaps he was referring to the fact that Internet authorities are very
reluctant to give out Class B networks these days, because they're running
out of them.  It used to be that you could get a Class B network if you had
more than about networks (at my former employer we got a Class B and
started subnetting when we outgrew our 5 unsubnetted Class C's), but now
you're usually expected to take a bunch of Class C's and subnet them.  The
Class C's will be adjacent so that your service provider can use CIDR
routing to consolidate them.
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000370][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 16:52:53 GMT
From:      jkeene@clark.net (Jeff Keene)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Advise Wanted: Corporate Subnetting Std

Bob Simon (bsimon@delphi.com) wrote:
: My corporation has a class B address.  I am on a committee which is defining
: rules by which subnet and host addresses will be assigned.  I recommended
: that RFC 1219 be followed strictly, but was outvoted by those who prefer the
: simplicity of assigning subnets in counting order (1-254) with a mask of
: 255.255.255.0.
:  
: This is not so terrible, but I am concerned about another proposal to assign
: host addresses in predefined ranges.  For example, PCs may be assigned
: addresses in the range 1-200; servers may be given addresses from 200-220;
: and routers may get the range 245-254.  This would completely eliminate the
: possibility of adding additional subnets (beyond 254 subnets) should the need
: arise in the future.

We went through converting from a bunch of class C's to our class B two 
years ago.  I led the committee that chose the subnet and address 
assignment scheme.  This was 'first contact' with IP for many of us,
but things seem to have worked out well.

We picked 255.255.255.128 as a mask.  That's worked fine.  LAN Ops 
assigned device groups places within the subnet.  This has not held up, 
we definitely have funny holes now.

What has held up well is pairing buildings together in subnet ranges.  
With the 510 possible subnets in our mask, we broke it up into ranges, 
giving large buildings a lot of subnets, then some free space, then a 
small building with a few subnets in the top of the range.

Both large and small buildings have a range pool to grow into that is 
reasonably large.  No fragments yet, and we relocate 120% of our staff 
every year.


-----------[000371][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 16:53:52 GMT
From:      lanka@speedracer.sysdev.telerate.com (Jeff Lanka)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Subnetting...


In article <LDAVIS.94Nov9081202@jaguar.vienna.itd.sterling.com>, 
ldavis@jaguar.vienna.itd.sterling.com (Lynch Davis) writes:
|>
|>Can anyone provide me with either a nice explanation
|>of subnets or at least a pointer to a doc or FAQ 
|>that contains the logic behind these animals?
|>

One good book is O'Reilly's TCP/IP Network Administration

--
Jeff Lanka
VMS/Unix SM sysdev
Dow Jones/Telerate

-----------[000372][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 94 00:32:22 PDT
From:      bvs@ver.com
To:        comp.unix.solaris,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Cc:        bvs@ver.com
Subject:   solaris window probe




We have found some problems with running solaris 2.3 TCP sessions
into a Stratus system.

The basic problem is that the Solaris sends window probes of
200 bytes into any closed tcp window. This is OK by my 
reading of the spec, but it hoses the tcp_input() routines
of BSD tahoe derived systems. If the outgoing tcp window
is closed, and the BSD derived system gets something that
is not at the window's edge, it throws that packet away. 
Because the Solaris probes with 230 byte window probe packets,
subsequent packet's seq number is outside the window by 230 bytes.
The BSD derived system checks in tcp_input.c (my line number 599,
yours may vary) for incoming seq numbers, and if the check
fails it throws away the packet. 

The net effect is that incoming
Solaris acks are tossed because the sequence number of the packet
they are in are outside the window by the size of the window
probe. If the window probe is one byte, it works OK. The Solaris
uses 320 byte window probes.

Has anyone else seen this behaviour?

I am planning a work-around (from user space, I don't have kernel
source) on the BSD derived system to never let the window stay 
closed. Does anyone have a better idea?

Thanks in Advance
Bill VerSteeg
bvs@ver.com

-----------[000373][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 94 17:33:51 GMT
From:      TCPMAINT@TWNMOE10.Edu.TW
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   program for network survey?

Hi!
 
   I just got the "host" program on my UNIX system to perform network
hosts survey. It is fine. Is there any program on the net that can
count the number of "Networks" registered under a given top-level
domain? Thanx in advance.
 
/Leo

-----------[000374][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 17:56:49 GMT
From:      atkinson@sundance.itd.nrl.navy.mil (Ran Atkinson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: DHCP as part of IPv6?

In article <wiley.6.2EC8DB5E@lilly.com> wiley@lilly.com (Michael S. Wiley) writes:
>Could anyone tell me if DHCP will be part of IPv6?  

Yes.  DHCP will need some new conforming extensions to support IPv6,
but DHCP is definitely part of the future.

>Or is it too early to know?  Our company is considering migrating to DHCP, 
>but if IPv6 is going to offer a different method of dynamically configuring 
>network parameters for client workstations then we may want to wait.  

Moving to DHCP is a sensible strategy.

Ran
atkinson@itd.nrl.navy.mil




-----------[000375][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 19:03:19 GMT
From:      samg@netcom.com (Sam Ghandchi)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,soc.culture.iranian
Subject:   Re: Real Time Voice Processing over the Internet

Pete Resnick (resnick@uiuc.edu) wrote:

: Maven is just audio, voice or otherwise. I believe (though again, the
: authors should be consulted) that the Maven code is incorporated into
: CuSeeMe, which is Cornell University's audio/video application for the
: Macintosh.
 
: pr
: -- 
: Pete Resnick    (...so what is a mojo, and why would one be rising?)
: Doctoral Student - Philosophy Department, Gregory Hall, UIUC
: System manager - Cognitive Science Group, Beckman Institute, UIUC
: Internet: resnick@uiuc.edu

thank you Pete.

- SG

-----------[000376][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 19:07:30 GMT
From:      annie@ngc.com (Annie Leung)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   BOOTP question

If a bootp client does not know its IP address, can it still specify
a specific BOOTP Server IP address ?  If yes, does that mean this
packet will have to be broadcasted on the DLC layer but with Destination
IP address in the IP layer being that of the BOOTP server ?  Isn't this
considered a special case then since we usually only broadcast on the DLC
layer if the IP destination address is a broadcast address ?

Thanks in advance for any information.


-----------[000377][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 20:03:06 GMT
From:      Evan Champion <evanc@bnr.ca>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   The smallest subnet possible

I would like to subnet a network so that (ideally) each IP on the
network is its own subnet.

The reason for this is that this network is populated by SLIP/PPP
clients who require only 1 IP address/host.  There is no need for
broadcast or network addresses over PPP links.

Is 255.255.255.255 a valid netmask?  That would be perfect for
me -- each host would then be in its own subnet.  The only
question I have is what happens to the network address and the
broadcast address for a network subnetted with at 255.255.255.255.

If 255.255.255.255 is not a valid subnet, what is the smallest
valid subnet?  I have been using 255.255.255.248, which allows
8 IP's/subnet (6 for hosts, 1 network address, 1 broadcast
address).  Unfortunately, that wastes 7 IPs per subnet, and with
10 networks dedicated to PPP users, that is a lot of wasted space.
On top, everyone knows how hard it is to get new networks
assigned; the CA*net registration office is now requiring me to
justify why I need new class C networks!

Any help would be *greatly* appreciated.

Evan

-----------[000378][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      16 Nov 1994 21:43:29 GMT
From:      Steinar.Haug@runit.sintef.no (Steinar Haug)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: need good explanation of CIDR and Class C subnetting

> Is there a FAQ or other net.document that explains issues such
> as CIDR blocks, subnetting Class C addresses, subnetting in relation
> to SLIP/PPP on terminal servers, and maybe some routing stuff too.

Have a look at the article by Havard Eidnes, available via anonymous
FTP from aun.uninett.no:/pub/misc/eidnes-cidr.ps.Z. This is basically
the same article that appeared in the August (I think) issue of the
Communications of the ACM.

Steinar Haug, SINTEF RUNIT, University of Trondheim, NORWAY
Email: Steinar.Haug@runit.sintef.no

-----------[000379][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 23:00:25 GMT
From:      ken@syd.dit.CSIRO.AU (Ken Yap)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: lpr client ... HELP!

A lpr client written in Perl can be found in my PPRD package at
ftp.syd.dit.csiro.au:pub/ken/pprd094.zip.

It attempts to be RFC1179 compliant. If not run as root, the client
port will not be between 721 to 731 but most lpds will forgive you.
And although the RFC says that servers must allow either order, some
lpds want the data file before the control file, so just reverse the
two subroutine calls in the Perl file. (Perl is great.)

-----------[000380][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 16 Nov 1994 23:15:17 GMT
From:      donp@novell.com (don provan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Local echoing for Telnet protocol

In article <39rh3o$j54@charm.magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu> prabau@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu (Patrick F Rabau) writes:
>    telnet> mode line
>1   SENT dont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD
>2   SENT dont ECHO
>3   RCVD wont SUPPRESS GO AHEAD (don't reply)
>4   RCVD will ECHO (reply)
>5   SENT do ECHO (reply)
>
>Isn't this a violation of the telnet protocol?  In line 2, the client says
>it wants the remote echoing option turned off.  The server _has_ to
>honor the request to disable that option, but it does not: in line 4,
>it answers WILL ECHO, to which the poor client agrees once again.

In fact, both the server *and* the client violated the protocol. As
you say, the server is in error answering a DONT with a WILL. The
hypothesis of the other responder -- that the WILL isn't a response
but is a coincidental request from the server -- is apparently
incorrect. The connection seems to be established and otherwise idle
when the user issued the "mode line" command, so there would be no
reason for the server to coincidentally negotiate ECHO for its own
purposes at that time.

On the other hand, until the client receives a WONT ECHO responding to
its DONT ECHO, it must act as if the connection is still in WILL ECHO
mode. When it receives the WILL ECHO from the server, the client must
ignore it because negotiation requests entering the existing state.
Responding to such a request is prohibited by paragraph 3b on page 2
of RFC-854. It is quite common, however, for TELNET implementors to
forget that the mode does not actually change until the negotiation
completes.

Fixing the client wouldn't help your problem, since the basic problem
is that the server refuses to turn off echoing. But the client
implementation is just a half a step away from going into an infinite
DONT/WONT/DO/WILL loop. If this WILL ECHO *had* been an unrelated
negotiation from the server, what would the client have done when the
WONT ECHO that actually *was* responding to the DONT ECHO came in?
From what we can see, it seems almost certain that it would have sent
DONT ECHO to agree with what it perceived as a new request from the
server...

						don provan
						donp@novell.com

-----------[000381][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 14:16:51 -0800
From:      cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.unix.programmer,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Select() on pipe() fd problem?

Environment: UnixWare SVR4.2 version 1.1.2:

A programmer here is having the follwing anomolous behavior on U.W. 1.1.2 which
is not happenin on OSF/1 nor on consensys SVR4.2v1.0:

Login shell is bash v1.14.2 (latest or very late)
Run a program that creates a pipe fd from pipe(), and forks.  The child dup()s
the pipe fd to 0,1,2 and then exec()'s $SHELL -c program a b c.  

If the Login shell is bash select() never returns with input from the pipe
on U.W. 1.1.2.  But if the login shell is ksh it will (as well as on the other
boxes)

Another interesting tid-bit is that I've jacked the # of pseudo-tty devices
up to >=96 on the malfunctioning box.  Using a receipe from... non-other than
M. Sohnius.  The consensys SVR4.2 box has the stock 16 or so /dev/pts/XXX,
which may point to one of the term disapline streams modules choking on a large
minor number??

Any ideas?? on why select() is misbehaving??

Thanks so much.


-----------[000382][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 14:17:00 -0700
From:      mike.laplaunte@freddy.supernet.ab.ca (Mike Laplaunte)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   802.2 help

I have a Novell 3.11 network running on a 16MB Token Ring setup.  We have
a OS/2 gateway that connects to a mainframe (SNA).  We are using 802.2
communication on the LAN to get mainframe sessions.

Problem:

We have just started using 16 bit cards that are from a third party
manufacturer.  We are using the ODI drivers along with IBM's DXM drivers
(specifically DXMA and DXMC).  Now, upon bootup, if I don't run the ODI's
I get 802.2 communcation just fine, but, the moment I load the "TOKEN"
driver, I hear a click from the MAU (expected), but I lose my 802.2 connection.

Our standard config.sys looks like this:

DEVICE=C:\SHELL\DXMA0MOD.SYS 001
DEVICE=C:\SHELL\DXMC0MOD.SYS 400012345678

Our standard autoexec.bat is simply:

lsl
token
ipxodi
netx

The only thing that we put in the net.cfg file is a preferred server statement.

If you have a solve, please post me on this conf or send internet mail to:
LAPLAM@censsw.gov.ab.ca

Thanks.


-----------[000383][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 03:33:20 GMT
From:      powers@gwis2.circ.gwu.edu (Eric S Powers)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   How do I put a server on internet?

We have a server that is running Novell.  It does have the proper TCP/IP 
connection.

However, whenever we try to access our server from ftp or telnet it says 
that it is not available.

Are there any suggestions on how we need to set up Novell so that users 
can access our server via the internet?

Thanks,
Eric

--
ESP a i r m a i l

-----------[000384][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 06:12:00 GMT
From:      anige@aladdin.nec.com.tw ()
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   How to debug fork process?

I have very large source code to maintain ,and this code using fork(  ) to work.
Is there any good debug tool to trace fork process? Where I can get or buy this debug tool.
My machine is  <MIPS>  machine,and unix o.s. is SVR4.2.

My e-mail address is anige@necta.nec.com.tw
Highest Regards!
 


-----------[000385][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 06:18:59 GMT
From:      jong-min@cae.wisc.edu (Jong-Min Park)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   terminal emulator that can receive zmodem in unix

Sorry if this is not the right group to ask this.

Is there a terminal emulator in unix that can receive using
zmodem protocol after connecting through telnet? Or any
combination of tools?

I need to transfer a file using zmodem protocol from a bbs
connected through telnet from unix.

I am not interested in serial/modem communication package
since I am directly connecting to the bbs using telnet
instead of dial-in or serial connection.

Also cu may not help since uucp is not available.

+-------- Jong-Min Park -=?B?EUC-KR?udrBvrnO?=-¹ÚÁ¾¹Î-----------
| E-mail: jong-min@engr.wisc.edu
| Office: (608)-263-7784       266 ME Bldg
 +-------- University of Wisconsin - Madison

-----------[000386][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 08:38:29 GMT
From:      pang@erg.abdn.ac.uk (Pang Siong Loon)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Help! Viterbi decoder

Hi,

I am simulating the efficiency of the TCP/IP over satellite link and I am looking for a software FEC encoder and decoder, especially the convolutional encoder and Viterbi decoder.  Is any one come across this or could give me a hint which ftp site I should try or which company I should contact?  

Your help will be very much appreciatated.  Please kindly email me at
s.l.pang@aberdeen.ac.uk

Thank you very much.




-----------[000387][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 09:11:43 GMT
From:      bjv@PROBLEM_WITH_INEWS_DOMAIN_FILE (Bennie Venter)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.os.ms-windows.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.setup,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,connect.audit
Subject:   Re: Can MS-Windows(3.11) use TCP/IP as THE ONLY transport protocol?

Ken Tough (object@ibmpcug.co.uk) wrote:
: I would like to know if it is possible to use TCP/IP for the 
: "default ms-windows protocol" i.e) as the standard transport over which 
: all ms-windows communications takes place.  (For example, picture a
: network of WfWg machines where the only Ethernet packets are IP ones.

This is possible but NT and WFW will then use NETBIOS on top of TCP/IP to
achieve what it already did using netbeui.

It also implies that you setup a Windows nameserver that will supply the
Netbios names to the particular machines IP address.  There is even a package
for linux called SAMBA that employs this in a limited way for disks & printers
via it's userfs package (ALPHA code).  It contains some decent documentation on
how to setup this sort of cenario.  To do the same on NT or WFW should then be
quite a breeze.


-----------[000388][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 11:53:48 GMT
From:      kmwatts@iglou.com (Ken Watts)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   PPP/SLIP over X.25?

Has anyone had any success with PPP or SLIP over an X.25 virtual Terminal 
Line, like TYMNET or TELENET?  I am trying to set up world-wide access for 
our users with laptop and don't want to install PAD software on their PC's.


_____________________________________________________________________________
Ken Watts                                    kwatts@landru.cacky.com
Commonwealth Aluminum             
P.O. Box 480                                 "Landru welcomes you"
Lewisport, KY 42351

-----------[000389][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 12:14:44 GMT
From:      r3503084@cc.ntu.edu.tw (r3503084)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   ???max window size and max packet size

I am trying to simulate end-to-end performance (include sliding window 
control).I have to know infomation about the max window size(or frequently
used size) and the max packet size in TCP and IP (frequently used one,like
TCP for UNIX from Berkeley).
Please tell me where can find the data?You can e-mail me using 
r83084@cctwin.ee.ntu.edu.tw
Thank you!


-----------[000390][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 13:07:38 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: The smallest subnet possible

In article <3adohq$mdp@bcarh8ab.bnr.ca>, Evan Champion <evanc@bnr.ca> writes:
|> I would like to subnet a network so that (ideally) each IP on the
|> network is its own subnet.
|> 
|> The reason for this is that this network is populated by SLIP/PPP
|> clients who require only 1 IP address/host.  There is no need for
|> broadcast or network addresses over PPP links.
|> 
|> Is 255.255.255.255 a valid netmask?  That would be perfect for
|> me -- each host would then be in its own subnet.  The only
|> question I have is what happens to the network address and the
|> broadcast address for a network subnetted with at 255.255.255.255.

It's not a valid "subnet", but it's certainly valid to advertise *host*
addresses via routing protocols.  (Indeed, it can be the only way to get
around some vendors' broken ARP implementations.  Sigh.)

At least on our product, setting a "subnet mask" of 255.255.255.255 is
how you configure it to advertise a host route.  Others might be
different.

What I'd recommand is setting up a small subnet (255.255.255.248, for
example) for your dial-in server and hosts, and then advertise the dial-
in users as routes outside of that subnet (rather than proxy-ARPing
them).

For example, if you have a gateway at 192.9.200.1, a host at .2 and some
dial-in servers at .3, .4, .5 and .6, then I'd assign 192.9.200.254 down
through 192.9.200.9 as the dial-in users.  This would allow you to have
246 users active at one time.

To make this work you will need gateways, hosts and servers which
understand host routes and honor them [not all do!].

|> If 255.255.255.255 is not a valid subnet, what is the smallest
|> valid subnet?  I have been using 255.255.255.248, which allows
|> 8 IP's/subnet (6 for hosts, 1 network address, 1 broadcast
|> address).  Unfortunately, that wastes 7 IPs per subnet, and with
|> 10 networks dedicated to PPP users, that is a lot of wasted space.
|> On top, everyone knows how hard it is to get new networks
|> assigned; the CA*net registration office is now requiring me to
|> justify why I need new class C networks!

The smallest legal subnet is mask 255.255.255.252, which gives you two
host addresses and two wasted addresses.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000391][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 14:05:04 GMT
From:      Clark Bremer <clarkb@netstar.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Lpr/Lpd for a PC

> 
> I want to be able to send output from a PC on an ethernet
> backbone to another PC with an attached printer. I could 
> do this with netware or Windows for Workgroups, but I wanted 
> to know if there is an lpd/lpr setup that would work on a 
> PC with a TCP stack running (LanWorkplace in our case). I don't 
> want to have to send a file, as a typical Lpr might do, but 
> "capture" output as netware does. Any ideas?
> 
I don't know about the capabilities of lwp, but the TCP/IP stack I
on my PC (TCP/Connect II, Intercon) allows me to do this.  It can
send to an lpr printer hanging off a Sun workstation as if it were
on LPT1, in both DOS and Windoze.  It also runs the Windoze analog 
of lpd, accepting print jobs from other TCP/IP machines.  CB.

-----------[000392][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 14:08:06 GMT
From:      jorge@b4pph131.bnr.ca (Jorge Rodriguez contractor)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Redundant/Fault Tolerant Lans Using TCP/IP

Assume the following configuration:

Multiple processors which communicate over "Redundant(2) Ethernet Based" Lans
to Various Peripherals (Bi directional) & to each other.  Communications 
protocol on LANs is TCP/IP.

A couple of key goals are:

1)	Be able to perform some type of Load Balancing between both Lans.
2)	Provide "Fault Tolerant" comunications support between Peripherals & 
	Processors.  (Be able to switch LANS w/out
	affecting communications protocol -- i.e. TCP/IP)
3)	Provide a "Dynamic" IP addressing scheme which will allow for 
	"Real Time" Route Table updates without effecting TCP & upper applications
	layers.  These Route Table updates would need to be based on some "Triggered"
	Update message which was broadcast on the Lan due to some Fault.

Does anyone know of a product which runs on top of TCP/IP which may provide this 
functionality?  

Information, as to any products which may provide some level of support for this
functionality would be greatly appreciated. 


   Jorge Rodriguez           
   Bell Northern Research        
   (919) 991-4638              
   Email:Jorge@bnr.ca     

-----------[000393][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 14:34:21 GMT
From:      hm@ix.de (Harald Milz)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Packet Filtering

In comp.protocols.tcp-ip, Alan Cox (iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk) wrote:

> Its called screend, its been done 8)

Is there such software for DOS as well? I try to use a DOS-based 
ISDN/IP-gateway which works fine but doesn't offer any security. 

--
Harald Milz (hm@ix.de)   WWW: http://www.ix.de/ix/editors/hm.html
iX Multiuser Multitasking Magazine      phone +49 (511) 53 52-377
Helstorfer Str. 7, D-30625 Hannover     fax   +49 (511) 53 52-378
Opinions stated herein are my own, not necessarily my employer's.

-----------[000394][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 04:22:11 -0800
From:      cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Redundant/Fault Tolerant Lans Using TCP/IP

Jorge Rodriguez contractor (jorge@b4pph131.bnr.ca) wrote:
: Assume the following configuration:
 
: Multiple processors which communicate over "Redundant(2) Ethernet Based" Lans
: to Various Peripherals (Bi directional) & to each other.  Communications 
: protocol on LANs is TCP/IP.
 
: A couple of key goals are:
 
: 1)	Be able to perform some type of Load Balancing between both Lans.
: 2)	Provide "Fault Tolerant" comunications support between Peripherals & 
: 	Processors.  (Be able to switch LANS w/out
: 	affecting communications protocol -- i.e. TCP/IP)
: 3)	Provide a "Dynamic" IP addressing scheme which will allow for 
: 	"Real Time" Route Table updates without effecting TCP & upper applications
: 	layers.  These Route Table updates would need to be based on some "Triggered"
: 	Update message which was broadcast on the Lan due to some Fault.
 
: Does anyone know of a product which runs on top of TCP/IP which may provide this 
: functionality?  
 
: Information, as to any products which may provide some level of support for this

What you has for is built starting at the NPI (just above the LAN card driver) 
on up through the routing functions and configuration database/file formates.

Vendors like HP and DEC, both have a 2 box "safe keeper" package that does
all of what you ask.  This type of functionality is typically vendor developed
due to the extensive changes necessary to the typical TCP/IP source trees.  It
is theoretically possible for a Linux/Free BSD development team to add these
types of features to there products, but it would not be a wise spending of
their precious resources.  

You'll have to buy these features built into an expensive vendor supplied 
system; Data General, DEC, HP and probably SUN too.

...


-----------[000395][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 04:26:05 -0800
From:      cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: oh dear, spray indicates 80 % losses

Filip Vandamme (filip@phil.eunet.be) wrote:
: Hi folks,
 
: Really being a bunch of software engineers, we're also responsible for own
: development systems ( Sun & HP workstations, PCs) and their interconnections
: across thin ethernet.
:  Lately, I experienced that when I was logged onto a workstation (from an-
: other workstation) my vi session would momentarily freeze during at least
: two seconds, before my cursor would resume its motion.
:  Taking a closer look at the network, I discovered that the collision rate
: seem to be zero all the time (perfmeter on a Sun). However, when doing a spray
: from one workstation to another, 9 out of 10 times I ended up with something
: like this:
 
:  $ spray eagle
:  sending 1162 packets of lnth 86 to eagle ...
:         in 10.4 seconds elapsed time,
:         940 packets (80.90%) dropped

Look for loose 10baseT/LAN coax connectors/ or missing terminators.  
Tug gently on the cables to make sure the BNC connectors are still crimped 
tight.  Ask who just added a new device in the last week...

...


-----------[000396][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 01:50:32 -0500
From:      msbeebe@mtu.edu (Matt Beebe)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   LAN to Internet

I want to be able to hook my LAN to the Internet...     

I want to be able to hook on PC up to a local service provider (via ISDN)
and have the other LAN users be able to piggy back on that connection.

I DO NOT want to dedicate a router/bridge, I'd just like the ISDN capable
PC to forward non-local IP packets.

Is the software available to do this?

Or, alternatively, is there cheap hardware available to do this?


		Thanks in advance,
				-Matt


-----------[000397][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 17:58:47 GMT
From:      Evan Champion <evanc@bnr.ca>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: The smallest subnet possible

> What I'd recommand is setting up a small subnet (255.255.255.248, for
> example) for your dial-in server and hosts, and then advertise the dial-
> in users as routes outside of that subnet (rather than proxy-ARPing
> them).
>
> For example, if you have a gateway at 192.9.200.1, a host at .2 and some
> dial-in servers at .3, .4, .5 and .6, then I'd assign 192.9.200.254 down
> through 192.9.200.9 as the dial-in users.  This would allow you to have
> 246 users active at one time.
> 
> To make this work you will need gateways, hosts and servers which
> understand host routes and honor them [not all do!].

The current configuration is as follows:

terminal server --> PPP customer
192.197.166.6       199.84.54.1
255.255.255.0       255.255.255.248

The PPP clients have their own networks separate from the local
Ethernet.

Now, what I have been told is that an IP host can only talk to
another IP host if it is on the same subnet unless there is a
router, and then the router must be on the same net as the IP
host.

So, assuming I subnet at 255.255.255.252, the IP configuration
would be

*.0 network address
*.1 address of the local PPP interface
*.2 address of the remote PPP interfae
*.3 broadcast address

*.4 network address
*.5 address of the local PPP interface
*.6 address of the remote PPP interface
*.7 broadcast address

etc. etc.

Now, what you are suggesting is that I more or less not subnet
the network at all -- just throw all the PPP clients together
in to one network and have the .1 be the terminal server.  Or
have I gotten it all wrong?

Evan

-----------[000398][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 18:39:30 GMT
From:      hm@ix.de (Harald Milz)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Packet Filter for MS-DOS ?

I'm trying to install a DOS-based ISDN/IP router using a cheap ISDN card,
its respective CAPI driver and ISPA. The only problem so far is a 
security concern: I cannot allow packets coming in on one B channel
to be routed to the other. Is there a routing software allowing 
for packet filtering? I looked at pcroute and ka9q, but neither of
them allows for that. 

Anyone?

--
Harald Milz (hm@ix.de)   WWW: http://www.ix.de/ix/editors/hm.html
iX Multiuser Multitasking Magazine      phone +49 (511) 53 52-377
Helstorfer Str. 7, D-30625 Hannover     fax   +49 (511) 53 52-378
Opinions stated herein are my own, not necessarily my employer's.

-----------[000399][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 19:15:27 GMT
From:      abell@kraft.apdev.cs.mci.com (Andrew_Bell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   All or nothing write to BSD socket

Is there some way that a socket can be set that if a write can't fully
complete (write all of the bytes you asked it to write) you can get
a -1 back or something, instead of doing a partial write?  I have looked
at setsockopt() and ioctl() and can't find anything.

What would also be fine is some way to look at the amount of space left
in the TCP send buffer (which, should tell me if my write might not
succeed completely).

Any ideas other than walking kernel structures?

Andrew Bell
voice: (719) 535-5218
abell@stimpy.cs.mci.com
5366046@mcimail.com (Andrew Bell / MCI)
The views expressed are solely mine and may not be the views of my employer.

-----------[000400][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 19:36:02 GMT
From:      Paul Thibodeau <pt1811s@acad.drake.edu>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Utilization of multiple class C licenses

Drake owns 8 consecutive class C licenses.  I want to take advantage of
all the numbers, but do not have the routers installed to divide the
TCP/IP network, and have no desire to install any on the network at this
point.  I am looking for ways to take advantage of the numbers.

Our numbers are 204.42.32.0 to 204.42.39.0.  I thought I would treat this
as a class B network.  To avoid any conflicts with others, I would use a
subnet mask of 255.255.248.0.   (I believe this is called supernetting
rfc1338)

The problem I am having is the fact that 204 is not in the range for
class B networks.  When I set up MacTCP, I can not have both the class B
mask and the class C number.  When I set the manual number of
204.42.32.1, MacTCP automatically changes my network to a Class C.  And
when I change the network to a class B, it will change my 204.42.32.1 to
128.0.0.0.  I can't have it both ways.  I only tried MacTCP since we are
mostly a Macintosh campus.

My question is as follows:
1)  Will this concept work in theory?  Are others using it?

2)  If so, can I get around the default settings in MacTCP?

Further Info:

Here is how I got the mask:

Pos->  8     7    6    5   4   3   2   1
Net | 128 | 64 | 32 | 16 | 8 | 4 | 2 | 1
.32    0     0    1    0   0   0   0   0
.33    0     0    1    0   0   0   0   1
.34    0     0    1    0   0   0   1   0
.35    0     0    1    0   0   0   1   1
.36    0     0    1    0   0   1   0   0
.37    0     0    1    0   0   1   0   1
.38    0     0    1    0   0   1   1   0
.39    0     0    1    0   0   1   1   1

Because the 8 licenses occupy all the binary option for the first 3
positions, I wanted to include them in the same network.  Therefore, I
get a mask of 11111111.11111111.11111000.00000000 ->255.255.248.0

Any help would be appreciated.

Paul Thibodeau
Microcomputer User Services Manager
Drake University
Des Moines, IA  50311
pt1811s@acad.drake.edu

-----------[000401][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 20:50:02 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: The smallest subnet possible

In article <3ag5kn$flf@bcarh8ab.bnr.ca>, Evan Champion <evanc@bnr.ca> writes:
|> > What I'd recommand is setting up a small subnet (255.255.255.248, for
|> > example) for your dial-in server and hosts, and then advertise the dial-
|> > in users as routes outside of that subnet (rather than proxy-ARPing
|> > them).
|> >
|> > For example, if you have a gateway at 192.9.200.1, a host at .2 and some
|> > dial-in servers at .3, .4, .5 and .6, then I'd assign 192.9.200.254 down
|> > through 192.9.200.9 as the dial-in users.  This would allow you to have
|> > 246 users active at one time.
|> > 
|> > To make this work you will need gateways, hosts and servers which
|> > understand host routes and honor them [not all do!].
|> 
|> The current configuration is as follows:
|> 
|> terminal server --> PPP customer
|> 192.197.166.6       199.84.54.1
|> 255.255.255.0       255.255.255.248
|> 
|> The PPP clients have their own networks separate from the local
|> Ethernet.

Are those clients just single nodes, or do they actually have multiple
nodes at the remote end?  If they're just signal nodes (like a PC, say),
then there's no reason to chew up a whole subnet for that.

|> Now, what I have been told is that an IP host can only talk to
|> another IP host if it is on the same subnet unless there is a
|> router, and then the router must be on the same net as the IP
|> host.

Come again?  That statement doesn't make sense to me.

There are two basic types of media in the IP world (ignoring for the
moment some telecom oddities) -- broadcast (like Ethernet) and point-to-
point (like PPP).

With a broadcast medium, you can only talk directly to nodes within your
subnet.  To get to other nodes, you must speak through a router with an
end-point address within that subnet which is attached to that medium.

With a point-to-point link, each end may talk to the other, and
"subnets" are irrelevent.  There's no such thing as a subnet mask,
network address or a broadcast in that case.  For convenience, most PPP
drivers let you specify the "subnet mask" of the remote end so that PPP
can inform the routing tables that the entire subnet is reachable
through that remote address.  Otherwise you'd have to either configure a
static route or use a routing protocol over the link, both of which are
annoying choices for small installations.  But if there's no subnet out
there at all, as is the case with a single isolated node, then there's
no reason to do that.

|> So, assuming I subnet at 255.255.255.252, the IP configuration
|> would be
|> 
|> *.0 network address
|> *.1 address of the local PPP interface
|> *.2 address of the remote PPP interfae
|> *.3 broadcast address
|> 
|> *.4 network address
|> *.5 address of the local PPP interface
|> *.6 address of the remote PPP interface
|> *.7 broadcast address
|> 
|> etc. etc.

Yes, it could look like that.  The "local address," though, is actually
unnecessary.  A point-to-point link is just that; it links together two
arbitrary IP nodes.

|> Now, what you are suggesting is that I more or less not subnet
|> the network at all -- just throw all the PPP clients together
|> in to one network and have the .1 be the terminal server.  Or
|> have I gotten it all wrong?

Yes, that's close to what I was saying.  I said that if you set your
server in a tiny subnet, you can put all of the PPP client addresses
outside of that subnet and use host routes to get to them.  If your
hosts and routers all support host routes, this will do the job.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000402][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 20:58:42 GMT
From:      murray@rd1.racal.com (Kevin Murray)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   r6000 errors in tcpip

I am experiencing 'runtime error R6000, stack overflow' when running
TCP/IP from FTP Software with another TSR software that reprograms
the 8259 PIC. Does anyone have any idea what this error means?

Thanks,
Kevin Murray.


-----------[000403][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 21:27:50 GMT
From:      filip@phil.eunet.be (Filip Vandamme)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   What address is 1.1.1.1?


Hello there,

Our SNMP management software find this address in the routing tables
of a router, though a ping 1.1.1.1 results in no answer.


Any ideas?

Cheers,

filip

-----------[000404][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 21:29:35 GMT
From:      filip@phil.eunet.be (Filip Vandamme)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   oh dear, spray indicates 80 % losses

Hi folks,

Really being a bunch of software engineers, we're also responsible for own
development systems ( Sun & HP workstations, PCs) and their interconnections
across thin ethernet.
 Lately, I experienced that when I was logged onto a workstation (from an-
other workstation) my vi session would momentarily freeze during at least
two seconds, before my cursor would resume its motion.
 Taking a closer look at the network, I discovered that the collision rate
seem to be zero all the time (perfmeter on a Sun). However, when doing a spray
from one workstation to another, 9 out of 10 times I ended up with something
like this:

 $ spray eagle
 sending 1162 packets of lnth 86 to eagle ...
        in 10.4 seconds elapsed time,
        940 packets (80.90%) dropped
 Sent:   112 packets/sec, 9.4K bytes/sec
 Rcvd:   21 packets/sec, 1.8K bytes/sec

Which even got worse for bigger packets. So my next mental move was, as
perhaps the eagle workstation got carried away by some heavy compilation,
to do a rup;

 $ rup eagle
          eagle    up 21 days, 14:14,    load average: 0.09, 0.32, 0.29

which completely scatters my confidence of network and computer understand-
ing. Does this actually means that due to reflections, for instance, 80 %
of the packets have to be retransmitted. But in that case our network
would be close to edge of saturation, wouldn't it? And it doesn't appear
to be so. Even when perfmeter doesn't seem to reveal any network
activity of packets, I experience the same spray results.

 So any idea what may be the cause of these temporarily meltdowns? How
I possibly could refine the symptons more to isolate the problem, and what I
have to conclude from the spray test? Further, apart from interactive
sessions should I notice something from all this at NFS level? I mean
as NFS is UDP based, an apparently 80 % packet lost should screw up
NFS, shouldn't it.

Much appreciating any clarifications of these observations.

filip




-----------[000405][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 21:51:32 GMT
From:      David Clarke <davidc@farallon.com>
To:        comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.misc,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows,comp.protocol.appletalk,comp.protocol.tcp-ip,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.networking,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Re: PC <----

> In article <39r796$a54@ipgate.le.ac.uk>, G.G. Owenson <ggo1@le.ac.uk> wrote:
> >Is it possible to link in some way a Mac (performa 475) and a PC (386)
> >directly using an ethernet network?
> >
> In a word, yes.
> 
> Farallon's PhoneNET software allows for a PC to use AppleTalk file sharing,
> using a remote Mac as the server (or even more than one!).  The only draw
> back is that you can't access the PC from the MAC.  I have both a PC and
> a Mac on my desktop, and I have found this tool to be instespensible.  Altho
> PhoneNET is most noted for the Mac hardware system, the PC version allows 
> the PC to be configured to use an Ethernet card for the file-sharing.
> 
> The software is bundled with Timbuktu for Windows.

Timbuktu can help when you need to access files on the PC from the Mac.
If you run Timbuktu on both your Mac and PC, you can transfer (not "share")
the files between the two computers. You can also remotely control the
Mac from the PC or vice versa.

> As for sharing a printer:  I have the same problem (my only printer is
> connected to my PC), and have yet to find a workable solution.  The easiest
> thing to do may be to attach the printer to one of your Mac, if one of
> them has a serial port open (mine doesn't), altho that will require an adapter.
> 

There is a PhoneNET PC-compatible solution for accessing your PC's printer
Miramar Systems in Santa Barbara, CA offers a product called MacLAN Connect
for Windows which allows you to publish your PC's harddisk and printer 
to the network so other PhoneNET PC or Mac users can access it.

I don't have Miramar's phone number, but they are in the 805 area code.

Regards,
David Clarke
Sr. Product Manager / Timbuktu
Farallon Computing, Inc.
http://www.farallon.com

-----------[000406][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 17 Nov 1994 22:05:14 GMT
From:      dtaylor@empros.com (Dave Taylor)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Subnetting to be avoided ?

In article <CzD7q7.H4F@eunet.ch>, fmeschbe@pax.eunet.ch (Meschberger) writes:
|> Hi,
|> 
|> I recently heard someone recomending not to use subnetting, i.e.
|> not to use a subnetz mask of 255.255.255.0 on a Class B address.
|> 
|> Is there some issue in that, or is it just hype ?

If you aren't supposed to subnet a class B network, then a lot of people
are doing it wrong.  I suspect the person either had some kind of unique
reason for not subnetting, or didn't really know whereof s/he spoke.

|> 
|> Thanks for your comments.
|> 
|> 
|> Felix
|> 
|> PS: Please DON'T start a flame war. I'm just interested in the pros
|>     and the cons.
|> 
|> =================================================================
|> this ain't a signature...
|> all opinions stated are my own, other standard disclaimers apply
|> COOP Schweiz, Systemtechnik      email: mefcs@coop.ch
|> Felix Meschberger                   or: CS-DEP2.MEFCS@mvs.coop.ch
|> Freidorf 151                     phone: ++41 (0)61 319 18 05
|> CH-4132 Muttenz                  fax  : ++41 (0)61 319 19 35
|> =================================================================
 
-- 
David K. Taylor                       dtaylor@empros.com
Siemens Empros Power Systems Control  (612) 553-4717

-----------[000407][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 06:49:00 -0500
From:      ulmo@panix.com (bradley ward allen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Do different routes each direction hurt?

What is the disadvantage of having different routes for each direction?

As long as the routers are:

* Capable of realizing when the link goes down
* Knowledgable of alternate routes

then the alternate routes will work, right?

So what's the big deal about a packet going two different ways, other
than a symptom of conflicting data?

-----------[000408][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 1994 22:29:24 GMT
From:      davisson@ida.org (Chuck Davisson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   passive ftp?

Does anyone know of Mac and PC implementations of
passive ftp?  We're implementing some changes and 
ftp from our Mac and PC's won't work.  I've found
some unix source code that almost works right, 
but haven't had any luck with the other platforms.

You can either post or email me directly.

Any info would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Chuck Davisson
davisson@ida.org

-----------[000409][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      17 Nov 94 23:10:04 GMT
From:      chandra@informix.com (Chandra Venkatesan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Winsock 1.1 for NT question

I wrote an Windows Sockets 1.1 for NT application using MSVC 1.10.
In this, the recv() function, once in a while, returns the error
code for "namelen argument is too small" error message.

In the help file winsock.hlp,  there is no such error code for
recv() function and only the bind() has that error return.

I was passing to the bind() function, sizeof(SOCKADDR_IN) for the
length argument, but even when I changed it to sizeof(struct sockaddr)
I still get the same error.

The interesting point is, it does not happen so frequently and the
confusing thing is that error code is not available for the recv()
function.

Have any of you Winsock programmers encountered this ?  What could
be the possible problem ?

Would appreciate e-mail replies to chandra@informix.com.

Thanks much in advance.


-----------[000410][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 13:39:55 -0800
From:      denny@hostfax.aifp.com (Tom Denny)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Address already in use message

We have a concurrent server application in TCP/IP which binds to an address
on a  well known port number.  When the application is killed, and then
restarted, bind fails with the message "Address already in use".  We then
either have to restart the machine or wait for 10-15 minutes before
restarting the application.  Does anyone have any idea what might be
causing this? 

Thanks for your help!

-Tom Denny
-- 
.oOO^OOo.
Tom Denny				American Int'l Facsimile Products
denny@hostfax.aifp.com			503 641-1611

-----------[000411][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 94 01:54:54 GMT
From:      stuartf@sequent.com (Stuart Friedberg)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Who's working on thousands of active TCP connections?

Is there anyone else out there working on performance of TCP
implementations with multiple thousands of active connections?
We've got 4K concurrently active connections working pretty well.
The problems that showed up with internal flow control and RTT
estimation assumptions aren't ones encountered with the "few"
connection cases usually covered in TCP performance work.

Anyone want to trade insights delicately without giving away
distinctive technology?  :-)  I am interested in problems encountered,
appropriate performance metrics, and testing methodologies.

By way of example, if you write test drivers that do
	for (;;) {
		poll(...) /* or select */
		/* for selected fd's */
		if (/* fd is passive */) {
			newfd = accept(fd, ...)
			/* add newfd to the poll/select list */
		} else {
			code = read(fd, ...)
			if (code == 0)
				close(fd)
		}
	}
the poll/select costs are O(N^2) when you sequentially set up N
connections.  At the moment, strpoll costs me (very) roughly 8
microseconds, which seems like a pretty small constant factor.
But crank N into the thousands and poll/select becomes a major
component of the elapsed time.  This has forced me to abandon
one test framework for one structured quite differently to
probe the 16K concurrently active connections case.

Stu Friedberg (stuartf@sequent.com)

-----------[000412][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 02:05:54 GMT
From:      whitten@papaya.cs.odu.edu (Richard Whitten)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Finger Extension



Does anyone know how I could extend the Finger program
so it would write a message (either e-mail or to a finger
log) to the person(s) being fingered?
  This is an exercise for school, not an actual proposition,
so please don't tell me how stupid it may be.  If this is the
wrong forum to post this, where would you recommend?
  Any help anyone can give me would be greatly appreciated.
Either email your response to me at whitten@papaya.cs.odu.edu
or post to this forum.  Thanks for your help.


Rich                  | It's a wicked world, |      Wow.... 
Whitten               | ainer, though.       |

-----------[000413][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 16:16:17 -0800
From:      cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   nfswatch binary for U.W.??

Environment: UnixWare SVR4.2, v 1.1.2

I'm having fun hacking nfswatch 4.1 to get it compiled for UnixWare.

It supposed to sniff NFS client/server packets from your
DLPI device (set to promisuous mode).

Well there's many minor edits to added either NFS or DLPI header files here
and there and some minor symbol name changes to get it to compile.  But
it's choking on my Intel ether express 16 device name of ee160, which is
LAN card 0.  The device node is named /dev/ee16_0.  Well, to make a long
story short, I've spent about an hour on the source, reading through the 
main, and following through the device open and dlattach() function 
and it's failing in the dlokack() function.  giving error message;
nfswatch: ee160: Error 0.  Given that the device node is named 
/dev/ee16_0, this may be understandable.  A physical link to /dev/ee160
does not fix this problem.

Looking throught the code, there where several assuptions made about
device names and where the LUN # would be.  

Does anyone have either nfswatch compiled for U.W. or another tool
that can snoop on what's going on with the NFS client and / or server
activity??

Thanks.





-----------[000414][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 03:30:16 GMT
From:      jeg@atux01.tec.att.com ()
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   HOST_BROADCAST example

If any1 has either a TLI or sockets based set of simple programs
that compile and run,
could you please mailx me the source code and an explanation
of how to run them.

Thanks a lot - Jeff

-----------[000415][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 03:30:59 GMT
From:      jbvb@elf.com (James VanBokkelen)
To:        comp.unix.solaris,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: solaris window probe

bvs@ver.com writes:

>We have found some problems with running solaris 2.3 TCP sessions
>into a Stratus system.
 
>The basic problem is that the Solaris sends window probes of
>200 bytes into any closed tcp window. This is OK by my 
>reading of the spec, but it hoses the tcp_input() routines
>of BSD tahoe derived systems. If the outgoing tcp window
>is closed, and the BSD derived system gets something that
>is not at the window's edge, it throws that packet away. 
>Because the Solaris probes with 230 byte window probe packets,
>subsequent packet's seq number is outside the window by 230 bytes.
>The BSD derived system checks in tcp_input.c (my line number 599,
>yours may vary) for incoming seq numbers, and if the check
>fails it throws away the packet. 
 
>The net effect is that incoming
>Solaris acks are tossed because the sequence number of the packet
>they are in are outside the window by the size of the window
>probe. If the window probe is one byte, it works OK. The Solaris
>uses 320 byte window probes.
 
>Has anyone else seen this behaviour?

Yep.  Once upon a time, when I maintained FTP Software's DOS TCP
(based on the MIT PC-IP TCP), we probed 0-windows (and sent ACKs in
general) with whatever packet was next on the queue.  Cost per packet
was much higher than cost per byte in a typical setup, so we left
any trailing data intact.

Not having the souce handy, I can't read the nasty comment I inserted
about whichever brain-dead Unixoid TCP ignored the ACK because it
checked the the data against the window first.  It might even have
been SunOS 3.something.  If I recall correctly, I tried to get language
criticizing this practice into RFC 1122, but I was unable to enlist
enough support to carry through anything as exotic as tinkering with
the TCP state machine.  Oh, well.  I wound up changing PC/TCP...

--
James B. VanBokkelen					Far Acres Farm
jbvb@{vax.ftp.com, asylum.sf.ca.us}			South Hampton, NH

-----------[000416][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 04:47:02 GMT
From:      barton@alpha.ces.cwru.edu (Wes Barton)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: lpr client ... HELP!

I've been working on a windows LPR client for a custom LPDaemon that runs at 
my school.  In addition to the 5 standard commands are added the 
06Authentification and the 07???? mystery command that they have yet to tell 
me about.  What I was wondering was whether or not there is any documentation 
better than RFC 1179.  Preferably with source and example control files.  The 
rfc lists the "IAB Official Protocol Handbok."  Does anyone know where I could 
get an electronic copy of this document.  Thanks for any help.

Wes


-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Wesley J. Barton
Department of Computer Engineering & Science
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, OH, USA

pc programme assistant
12th Annual International Conference on Logic Programming
Tokyo, Japan
ICLP '95

barton@alpha.ces.cwru.edu
wjb3@po.cwru.edu

-----------[000417][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 07:49:12 GMT
From:      wat@ewi.ch (Wacker Thomas)
To:        comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic

In article <3aai5a$1ab@news2.delphi.com> dougm@delphi.com wrote:

: I've been able to use RMON tools to meaure the traffic on my network segments, 
: Are there tools out there than can "massage" this data out of my RMON probes or
 Not that I know.
: do I need to use yet another application to gather this data?


: "Off the rack" applications would be preferred.

Of course there is Nevil Brownlee's NeTraMet/NeMaC. 

Mail 		n.brownlee@auckland.ac.nz
FTP		ftp://ccu1.auckland.ac.nz/iawg/NeTraMet

Unfortunately I didn't get a chance to try it yet (time is running...),
but it sure looks promising. Follow up on the internet accounting
working group

  accounting-wg-request@wugate.wustl.edu
	Mailing List of the Internet Accounting Work Group
  ftp://wuarchive.wustl.edu/doc/mailing-lists/accounting-wg
	  Archive of the Internet Accounting Work Group

: Also I don't get to read news as much as I would like, so if you can
: follow up in email, that'd be great.  When I get a chance, I'll post a
: summary of reponses back here.

			Take Care,

			Thomas

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
___         .   Thomas Wacker                  |Phone       ++41 1 385 31 57
__   / / /  |   Internetworking Consultant     |Fax         ++41 1 385 24 25
___   / /   |   wat@ewi.ch     /g=Thomas/s=Wacker/o=EWI/p=EUNET/a=ARCOM/c=CH
   E l e k t r o w a t t  E n g i n e e r i n g  S e r v i c e s  L t d .

-----------[000418][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 16:16:46 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Return value from inetd time service

In article <3ail6f$i8c@dplanet.p2k.sda.cbis.com> robl@cbis.com (Rob Lesieur) writes:
>What format is the data returned from telneting to the inetd
>time service (37/tcp)????  

It's the number of seconds since midnight on January 1, 1900, as a 32-bit
binary number in network byte order (it can be converted to a local binary
number with ntohl() on systems that provide this macro).
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000419][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 08:23:54 GMT
From:      frank@beach.silcom.com (Frank Dziuba)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP - Virtual IP addresses

haltarac@rain.org wrote:
: Frank Dziuba (frank@beach.silcom.com) wrote:
: : Hi,
 
: : I want to be able to have a host machine act as if it has several IP 
: : addresses so I can have an HTTP daemon(s) serve data from different
: : directories depending on what 'host' they were connected as. 
 
: It looks complicated. Why would you need this. If your goal is to hide
: some parts of the directory names behind an IP address, then
: you can problably make something more elegant by just mounting those
: directories just under /

No, the goal is to allow a machine to accept a connection on port 80
using the http daemon, and allow the daemon to determine, by the IP address,
what pages it should serve. For example, many systems have multiple domains
which point to them, and they want you to be able to say something like
"http://www.xyz.com/" or "http://www.abc.com/" and be able to serve you
a _different_ home page each time. Unfortunatly, the HTTP protocol does
not send the "www.xyz.com" part of the request to the daemon, it simply
sends the "/" request to whatever daemon it finds at the _IP_ address
that those names resolve to.

That's why you'll often see sites with addresses like "http://www.abc.com/abc"
which is pointing to the "abc" directory. To a user who is trying to "guess"
a company's web address, this is not an obvious guess. They would be more
apt to guess "www.abc.com" for the "abc"company, and end up getting the
general home page for "The Mall network"  that the pages are hosted on.

Most major companies do _not_ want to be part of a "mall", they want to have
their own presence. However, maintaining 100 servers for 100 companies is a
lot more work than maintainig 1 server with multiple IP addresses.

--

Frank Dziuba
Silicon Beach Communications
frank@silcom.com


-----------[000420][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 09:19:34 GMT
From:      klimt@Informatik.TU-Muenchen.DE (Wolfgang Klimt)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Help: Is there any implementation of RDP?

Hi all,

the topic says it already: Is there any Implementation of RDP available
on the net which runs under UNIX-like operating systems (Preferred: HP-UX,
SunOS, Solaris, Ultrix). RDP (Reliable Datagram Protocol) is described in
RFC 1151, but I never heard about any existing implementation. Any help 
(also information about other systems providing reliable connections via
UDP) is welcome.

Greetings -- Wolfii

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wolfgang Klimt * klimt@informatik.tu-muenchen.de * wolfii@leo.org * IRC: wolfii
               Windows 3.1 -- from the guys who brought you edlin

-----------[000421][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 09:48:54 GMT
From:      dauphin@lula.idris.fr (Marie-Noelle Dauphin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   trumpet winsock and appletalk and phoneNet


Hello,

I want to install on my PC (connected via phoneNet on a reseau Appletalk )
trumpet winsock to access to the internet via a passerelle FastPAth ....

is it possible ? what driver can i use ?
thank's for your Help ...
Marie Noelle Dauphin
~
~
~
~
~
~

-----------[000422][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 18:38:08 -0500
From:      gfm2@ns2.CC.Lehigh.EDU (GEORGE F. V MOTTER)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Stupid telnet negotiation question...


I am writing a program in Windows and part of it needs to telnet into a Linux
server on port 23, login, and fork to another program.  I have very little
experience in writing telnet code so I have a stupid question.

I connect to port 23, negotiate my little heart out, but I have no clue how to
tell the Linux box that "I'm sick of negotiating, give me the darn login
prompt!"  What is the command sequence?

Thanks for the info.

George


*  George Motter                                        Voice: 610 758-6149  *
*  Lehigh University                                      Fax: 610 865-8061  *
*  Bethlehem, Pennsylvania                        Internet: gfm2@lehigh.edu  *

-----------[000423][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 11:48:18 GMT
From:      andrew@labyrinth.bt.co.uk (Andrew Lucking)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Help: Is there any implementation of RDP?

>Is there any Implementation of RDP available on the net which runs under UNIX-like >operating systems (Preferred: HP-UX, SunOS, Solaris, Ultrix).

Yes there is for BSD Unix (eg SunOS). Craig Partridge wrote a paper for USENIX on RDP
describing his M.Sc. work.

The code he wrote is on unix.hensa.ac.uk. in pub/uunet/networking/ip/RDP.tar.Z

I hope this is of some use. If you find any other implementations of RDP
I would be interested.

Andrew




-----------[000424][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 20:15:12 -0500
From:      mccready@pipeline.com (Gary McCready)
To:        comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.networking,vmsnet.networks,management.misc,vmsnet.networks.misc,comp.dcom,sys.cisco,comp.dcom,sys.wellfleet,comp.dcom.lans.misc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.multinet,vmsnet.networks.tcp-ip.ucx
Subject:   NYC talk on routing by Cisco

   DECUS/NEW YORK METRO LOCAL USERS GROUP
      MONTHLY MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

Carl Wagner, of Cisco, on Routers and Routing issues

Date:  TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1994 from 5 pm to 9 pm
Pre-dinner discussion & cocktail hour starts at 5pm
Sit-down dinner starts around 6:15
Featured Presentation begins at 7:30 pm

   >>>>>New Meeting location!<<<<<<<<<<<
** Site:  DARBY O'DOYLE'S, 43 WEST 46TH ST. (2ND FLOOR) 
MANHATTAN
   (between 5th & 6th Avenues)

RESERVATIONS REQUESTED Call 718-468-2983 by 5 PM, MONDAY, NOV. 
28
Or, send Internet e-mail to: NYMLUG-RESERVATION@DECUS.ORG
The meeting is free; dinner costs $25 (choice of entree &
dessert) Please note seating is not guaranteed unless you make 
a
dinner reservation. 

** CARL WAGNER, Manager of Systems Engineering for Cisco 
(makers
   of routers and other network products) on "Routing: 
Introductio and Implementation"  What's routing all about?  How
do routers work?  What's needed on your system? ... Examples of
routers and routing within businesses and on the Internet ... A
technical talk.

** Next meeting, Jan. 31:  Gerald Barker, of Eigen Software,
"Porting Kernel-Mode Code from VAX/VMS to AXP/VMS"...

No meeting in December.

** CALL 718-468-2983 IF YOU'D LIKE TO RECEIVE THESE NOTICES BY
FAX **


INFORMATION ABOUT OUR MAILING LISTS:

To subscribe to this electronic-mailing list,
send internet e-mail to:
  MAILSERV@DECUS.ORG
containing the text:
  SUBSCRIBE NYMLUG-LIST
For more detailed instructions, send e-mail to:
  MAILSERV@DECUS.ORG
containing the single word (no other text needed):
  HELP

To subscribe to our US Mail list 
(we send postcards with meeting announcements), write to
          Christopher Thorn
          NY Metro LUG Secretary
          Elias Bureau
          500 Fifth Ave.
          Suite 2114
          NY, NY 10110-0297






-----------[000425][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 12:49:21 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP - Virtual IP addresses

In article <Cz3JnA.5xs@beach.silcom.com> frank@beach.silcom.com (Frank Dziuba) writes:
>I want to be able to have a host machine act as if it has several IP 
>addresses so I can have an HTTP daemon(s) serve data from different
>directories depending on what 'host' they were connected as. 
>
>Does anyone have any ideas on how this can be done?!

Depends on your OS. Some let you assign multiple addresses to devices,
others have 'dummy' type devices you can attach addresses to. I've done this
two or three times with Linux the dummy driver, a proxy arp entry and httpd
told to bind to a specific address.

Alan
-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000426][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 12:55:10 GMT
From:      thed@mtek.chalmers.se (Thed Lyngmo)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Sockets - on IP-Layer (SOCK_RAW)???

Andreas Eiss (eiss@ls3.informatik.uni-dortmund.de) wrote:
: When I open a socket there is a possibilty to set the socket-type to
: SOCK_RAW. Since
: I want to send messages on the IP-Layer, I tried to send messages with
: that type of sockets, but without success. Sockets on IP-Layer are not
: described in the manuals, therfore I have no idea what is wrong in my
: implementation. 

I'm interested too. I want to send my own TCP-packages down to the IP-
module but I can't figure out how to specify the protocol to IP.
The receiving end gets my packages alright but with protocol 0 (zero).

It would be even better if I could skip the IP-module too and send my data
to the ethernet driver. Is that possible?

Any ideas?

Kind regards,
Ted Lyngmo

-----------[000427][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 13:20:34 GMT
From:      schmitzo@europa1.erlm.siemens.de (Schmitz)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   udp-checksum?


Hi there,
does anyone knows that it is correct to implement a UDP-stack
without a checksum?

-- 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
|			|	Postal-Adress				|
|  Olaf Schmitz		|	Siemens AG, Power Generation Group	|
|			|	KWU LV23				|
|Tel:(+49)09131/18-9910	|	P.O.Box 3220				|	
|Fax:(+49)09131/18-6864	|	D-91050 Erlangen			|	
|			|	germany					|
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
|            E-Mail: Olaf.Schmitz@le23.kwu.siemens.de			|
-------------------------------------------------------------------------



-----------[000428][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 13:49:40 GMT
From:      ojr@regtek.sintef.no (Ornulf Rodseth)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Redundant/Fault Tolerant Lans Using TCP/IP


I would be very much interested if you get any answers to your
question. We are looking at the same type of problem: Using TCP/IP
for a (relatively) high reliability control system.

Without solving the load balancing problem we have found three
possible solutions:

- Use twisted pair ethernet with HUBs. It is possible to get hold of
  transceivers that can communicate with two HUBs and automatically
  select the one that is working. We would use one HUB as primary and
  the second as backup. Intelligent HUBs with, e.g., SNMP are said to
  be able to facilitate switching between the two networks. The
  solution should support all IP traffic with use of standard software
  and hardware. Fast switch between primary and secondary networks.

- Use token ring network layer with backup ring (IEEE802.5b or
  something like that - hard to get hold implementations of this I
  think). Completely transparent at application level - fast
  switchover.

- Use double contra-rotating FDDI with DAS. Expensive. Completely
  transparent at application level - fast switchover.

To have load balancing I would think you need to have two IP-addresses
per host, i.e., have two Ethernet boards and some software to select
one of the two networks for each new connection. This probably
requires special software to manage switch in routing tables fast
enough if one network goes down.

Regards,
Ornulf Jan Rodseth M.Sc.	ornulf.rodseth@regtek.sintef.no
SINTEF Automatic Control	+(47) 7359-4351 (direct) / -4375 (switchboard)
N-7034 TRONDHEIM, NORWAY	+(47) 7359-4399 (fax)

-----------[000429][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 14:06:08 GMT
From:      zhebu@svusenet.ubs.ch
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.unix.programmer,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Select() on pipe() fd problem?

Paul Smith (cgi@crl.com) wrote:
..
: Run a program that creates a pipe fd from pipe(), and forks.  The child dup()s
: the pipe fd to 0,1,2 and then exec()'s $SHELL -c program a b c.  
A pipe is per default one-way. Do you use two pipes, one for 0 and one for 1 
and 2? You can't use a pipe like, say, a tcp stream connection fd, where you
can read AND write.

Just my $0.02 ....

Urs
--
NAME   Urs Eberle
EMAIL  urs.eberle@zhflur.ubs.ubs.ch
PHONE  ++41-1-236-58-08

-----------[000430][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 14:28:30 GMT
From:      etxmesa@eos.ericsson.se (Michael Salmon)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Redundant/Fault Tolerant Lans Using TCP/IP

In article <3afo46$bpg@nrtphaa9.nt.com>
jorge@b4pph131.bnr.ca (Jorge Rodriguez contractor) writes:
|> Assume the following configuration:
|> 
|> Multiple processors which communicate over "Redundant(2) Ethernet Based" Lans
|> to Various Peripherals (Bi directional) & to each other.  Communications 
|> protocol on LANs is TCP/IP.
|> 
|> A couple of key goals are:
|> 
|> 1)	Be able to perform some type of Load Balancing between both Lans.
|> 2)	Provide "Fault Tolerant" comunications support between Peripherals & 
|> 	Processors.  (Be able to switch LANS w/out
|> 	affecting communications protocol -- i.e. TCP/IP)
|> 3)	Provide a "Dynamic" IP addressing scheme which will allow for 
|> 	"Real Time" Route Table updates without effecting TCP & upper applications
|> 	layers.  These Route Table updates would need to be based on some "Triggered"
|> 	Update message which was broadcast on the Lan due to some Fault.
|> 
|> Does anyone know of a product which runs on top of TCP/IP which may provide this 
|> functionality?  
|> 
|> Information, as to any products which may provide some level of support for this
|> functionality would be greatly appreciated. 

Tandem computer have a reliable Ethernet interface which consists of 2
interfaces that they can switch between, ARP takes care of the change
in Ethernet address. They intended that there be a single LAN
connection so they don't have load balancing. The 2 I/F's need to be
able to talk to each other so you need a bridge (or 2) to handle that.
2 out of 3 isn't bad.

-- 

Michael Salmon

#include	<standard.disclaimer>
#include	<witty.saying>
#include	<fancy.pseudo.graphics>

Ericsson Telecom AB
Stockholm

-----------[000431][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 16:43:28
From:      Stephen_n_willliams@mmacmail.jccbi.gov (Stephen N. Williams)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP/IP Novice

I am entering the world of TCP/IP and would like some references for material 
on the internet that would help me learn what I need to know. If you have such 
docs laying aroung mail to stephen_n_williams@mmac.jccbi.gov.  THANKS

-----------[000432][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 16:00:02 GMT
From:      maass@orchis.enet.dec.com (Joerg Maass)
To:        comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic


Newsgroups: comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Distribution: world
X-Newsreader: mxrn 6.18-8
Followup-To: 
References:  <3aai5a$1ab@news2.delphi.com>
From: maass@orchis.enet.dec.com (Joerg Maass)
Reply-To: Joerg.Maass@frs.mts.dec.com
Organization: Digital Equipment, Frankfurt, Germany
Subject: Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic
Keywords: RMON, Sniffer, traffic

In article <3aai5a$1ab@news2.delphi.com>, dougm@delphi.com (Doug McPherson) writes:
>
>I've been able to use RMON tools to meaure the traffic on my network segments, 
>and I can tell that TCP/IP is using n% of my traffic.  What I *can't*
>tell from these tools is *which* TCP/IP applications are consuming that n %?!
>I.e. I'd like to be able to break the TCP/IP traffic down into
>source/destination groupings, based on the TCP/IP application (e.g.
>telnet, ftp, HTTP,Doom, etc).
>
>Are there tools out there than can "massage" this data out of my RMON probes or
>do I need to use yet another application to gather this data?
>
>I'm currently looking at NNstat to gather the data.  It's free, it runs on my 
>Alpha systems, but it's pretty "low to the ground".   If there are
>similar applications out there that will let me analyze multiple
>segments of TCP/IP traffic, and are easier to install/configure than
>NNstat, I'd very much like to
>know.
>
>"Off the rack" applications would be preferred.
>

Hi Doug,

try our POLYCENTER Probewatch on OSF/1 product together with DECpacketprobes 90
(Ethernet) and 900RR (Token Ring). The Probes are out now, the software will be
available in February.

If you look at RMON statistics, you should ensure that the probes and software
in question support all eight RMON groups, which is not necessarily common.
RMON has the capability to provide traffic matrices and protocol decoding, if
you have the appropriate tools. Both our software and hardware support the full
range of RMON groups, so they should be able to solve your problem.


Yours sincerely



Joerg Maass
-- 


Digital Equipment GmbH                Tel.: +49/6103/383-107
Robert-Bosch-Str. 5                   Fax : +49/6103/383-157
D-63303 Dreieich-Sprendlingen         Joerg.Maass@frs.mts.dec.com


-----------[000433][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 16:27:18 GMT
From:      stein <stein@gcomm.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Local echoing for Telnet protocol

> That's moderately true.  I made the simplifying assumption that this guy
> isn't an amazing speed typist, and that the line was basically quiescent
> when the "telnet> mode line" request was made, since that's usually an
> awkward incantation to make.

Ah, no you're quite right.  I didn't look closely enough.  It is 
rather unlikely that the data RCVD was not in response to that SENT,
given that they occured after the "set line mode".
 


> If it were the case that either the "WILL ECHO" was sitting in an input
> buffer while "mode line" was entered or that the "DONT ECHO" wasn't seen
> by the peer before "WILL ECHO" was sent, then you're right and this is
> somewhat ambiguous.  I would actually expect to see a loop develop in
> that case (1 and 2 below are simultaneous):
> 
> 1.	SENT dont ECHO
> 2.	RCVD will ECHO
> 3.	SENT do ECHO		(response to "will" at 2)
> 4.	RCVD wont ECHO		(response to "dont" at 1)
> 5.	SENT dont ECHO		(response to "wont" at 4)
> 6.	RCVD will ECHO		(response to "do" at 3)
> 7.	SENT do ECHO		(response to "will" at 6)
> 8.	RCVD wont ECHO		(response to "dont" at 5)
> 9.	SENT dont ECHO		(response to "wont" at 8)
> 10.	RCVD will ECHO		(response to "do" at 7)
> 
> (A reasonable system might choose to stop responding to excessive DOs,
> though.)

Fortunately though, there are rules against this kind of thing.  
Consideration 3b on page 2 of RFC854 specifically addresses the 
DONT-WONT-DONT-WONT and the DO-WILL-DO-WILL loops you're suggestng:
"If a party receives what appears to be a request to enter some
mode it is already in, the request should not be acknowledged.  This
non-response is essential to prevent endless loops in the 
negotiation."  So every response after the first 4 is in violation 
(assuming conditions are static throughout).



> However, if it is the case that the remote end is refusing to turn off
> the remote echo option by replying "WILL ECHO" in response to "DONT
> ECHO" (and that does seem to be the case here), then that remote device
> is broken.  That's not a legal thing to do.

I concur.



-- Bob Stein

-----------[000434][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 16:31:17 GMT
From:      stein <stein@gcomm.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: All or nothing write to BSD socket

> Is there some way that a socket can be set that if a write can't fully
> complete (write all of the bytes you asked it to write) you can get
> a -1 back or something, instead of doing a partial write?  I have looked
> at setsockopt() and ioctl() and can't find anything.
 
> What would also be fine is some way to look at the amount of space left
> in the TCP send buffer (which, should tell me if my write might not
> succeed completely).

Both are noble and reasonable, but apparently not possible.  I wanted
to do both with our TCP/IP stack, Piper/IP which is based on BSD Unix,
but came to find there is no way.  The best you can do is select(),
which will tell you whether you can send 1 or more bytes or not.

-- Bob Stein, Galacticomm

-----------[000435][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 16:36:30 GMT
From:      robl@cbis.com (Rob Lesieur)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Return value from inetd time service

What format is the data returned from telneting to the inetd
time service (37/tcp)????  

--
Rob Lesieur
robl@cbis.com
=> My opinions and statements do not necessarily   <=
=> reflect the opinions or policies of my employer <= 

-----------[000436][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 15:17:32 +0100
From:      casper@fwi.uva.nl (Casper H.S. Dik)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: oh dear, spray indicates 80 % losses

cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith) writes:

>:  $ spray eagle
>:  sending 1162 packets of lnth 86 to eagle ...
>:         in 10.4 seconds elapsed time,
>:         940 packets (80.90%) dropped

The only thig spray is suitable for is to find out which of the machines
is the slowest.  A spray from a fast machine to a slow machine will
always drop packets.  Spray is only useful for denial of service.

Casper

-----------[000437][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 17:52:52 GMT
From:      leonard@telcom.arizona.edu (Aaron Leonard)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Do different routes each direction hurt?


In article <3ai4bc$quf@panix3.panix.com>, ulmo@panix.com (bradley ward allen) writes:
|What is the disadvantage of having different routes for each direction?
|
|As long as the routers are:
|
|* Capable of realizing when the link goes down
|* Knowledgable of alternate routes
|
|then the alternate routes will work, right?
|
|So what's the big deal about a packet going two different ways, other
|than a symptom of conflicting data?

Sure, asymmetric routes work fine.  However, even if you have
backup routing set up, asymmetric routes are less reliable
than symmetric ones, in the sense that the probability that
the round-trip path will be down (due to route flap) is
function of the union of the (reliability-weighted) "length" 
of the two paths.  (I mean, your virtual session will be hung 
if there's an path outage in either direction, right?)

So a purely asymmetric route can be expected to be down almost
twice as much as a comparable symmetric one.

Aaron

-----------[000438][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 18:27:43 GMT
From:      mpetry@ddc.cio.eds.com (Marsha Petry)
To:        comp.sys.sun.admin,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Routing question:  Getting a Sun to route

>
>Richard Steinberger (ric@updike.sri.com) wrote:
>:       A remote user connects (from his Sun) to our network of Suns via PPP.
>: He has set the default route (in /etc/defaultrouter) to be the address
>: of the Sun he connects to.  He is able to telnet (and rlogin and
>: ping, etc) to our local Sun with no problems.  [The remote modem dials out,
>: the local one answers...].  But he would like to also be able to
>: connect to other machines on our net, using the the machine he
>: physically comes in on as a router.  This isn't working; that is, the
>: local machine isn't routing his incoming packets to other local machines.
>: [And packets aren't routed out the other way back to his machine either.]
 
>:       Can anyone help with a few details: First, is it possible for a Sun
>: (4.1.3) to do this routing for in incoming/outgoing PPP connection?  Second,
>: what is the form of the relevant route (or related) command?  An RTFM (which
>: M?) would be OK too.  Thanks in advance to all who reply.....
>

This is an older query and perhaps already answered, but since I didn't
see the response I want to give in any of the mail since 11-4, I thought
I'd put my 2 cents in.

We have a similar (possibly exact same?) situation: a remote Sun 
calling into a Sun to connect to a network.  The Suns run SunOS 4.1.3,
and the PPP running is the ppp-2.1.2 version (I didn't see which ppp
you are running).  I could connect the 2 Suns fine, but I could not
see anybody else on the network without doing a lot of manual routes.
Then I tried the *proxyarp* option (suggested in the ppp setup doc) on
the machine which runs the pppd passive (i.e. the "called" machine) --
it worked! I was one happy puppy, considering I'd spent an evening 
on the silly problem. (My puppies were happy too, cause I got to go 
home and play with them!)

The "proxyarp" option is placed in the /etc/ppp/options file.
After ppp is established, you'll see (using the arp -a command) that
the address has been published to the network (and it must be
*published*...I tried manually creating the arp entry and did not
publish it, and that didn't work)

Hope this helps and isn't too much "old news".
______________________________________________________________________
# Marsha Petry                                                       #
# mpetry@ddc.cio.eds.com      **Opinions are my own and that's all** #

-----------[000439][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 94 19:02:46 GMT
From:      ddl@harvard.edu (Dan Lanciani)
To:        comp.unix.solaris,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: solaris window probe

In article <3ah75j$q2o@satisfied.elf.com>, jbvb@elf.com (James VanBokkelen) writes:

| Yep.  Once upon a time, when I maintained FTP Software's DOS TCP
| (based on the MIT PC-IP TCP), we probed 0-windows (and sent ACKs in
| general) with whatever packet was next on the queue.  Cost per packet
| was much higher than cost per byte in a typical setup, so we left
| any trailing data intact.
| 
| Not having the souce handy, I can't read the nasty comment I inserted
| about whichever brain-dead Unixoid TCP ignored the ACK because it
| checked the the data against the window first.  It might even have
| been SunOS 3.something.  If I recall correctly, I tried to get language
| criticizing this practice into RFC 1122, but I was unable to enlist
| enough support to carry through anything as exotic as tinkering with
| the TCP state machine.  Oh, well.  I wound up changing PC/TCP...

The particular over-aggressive, ACK-dropping code in BSD's tcp_input
that causes this problem was also the instigator of the SYN wars
(on self-connect) discussed here a while back.  I believe the patch
I provided will cover both situations.  Personally, I call the problem
a bug in tcp_input but at best it represents an extremely counter-productive
interpretation of the state machine descriptions. :)

				Dan Lanciani
				ddl@harvard.*

-----------[000440][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 19:20:12 GMT
From:      jjm@swlrb9.msd.ray.com (James Murphy {75881})
To:        comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic


NetMetrics from HP does a lot of what you seem to be looking for.

-- 
The opinion expressed here are mine, not my employers.  In fact,
opinions are probably the one thing developed at work that
employers do _not_ claim ownership of.

-----------[000441][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 20:03:22 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Sockets - on IP-Layer (SOCK_RAW)???

> I'm interested too. I want to send my own TCP-packages down to the IP-
> module but I can't figure out how to specify the protocol to IP.
> The receiving end gets my packages alright but with protocol 0 (zero).

The third argument to socket() becomes the value of the IP protocol field.

> It would be even better if I could skip the IP-module too and send my data
> to the ethernet driver. Is that possible?

Yes, using something like BPF, NIT, or DLPI.  I suggest you get the
latest tcpdump release (ftp.ee.lbl.gov) and look and the libpcap sources
that come with it (or perhaps they're a separate file, I can't recall).
It's a neat library that lets you write your own frames to the Ethernet,
or whatever you have.

Also, you might be able to write your own TCP segment using this, but
how are you going to read back the replies?  For a protocol that the
kernel supports (e.g., TCP) the kernel will receive the reply too ...

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000442][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 20:07:46 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: All or nothing write to BSD socket

> The best you can do is select(),
> which will tell you whether you can send 1 or more bytes or not.

Actually, with newer BSD releases (4.4BSD-Lite, probably Reno too),
select() returns true if at least the low water mark amount can be
processed (the SO_SNDLOWAT option).  The default for this socket
option is 1.

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000443][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 06:52:22 -0600
From:      allen@wuerl.wustl.edu (Allen Rueter)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.unix.programmer,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   AIX, ansi and sys/sockets.h

The following short program compiles on AIX(RS6000) with the cc
(extended) but not with c89. Is sys/sockets.h not ansi?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/sockets.h>

main() {
    printf("Hello world\n");
}

% c89 tst.c
"/usr/include/sys/socket.h", line 129.2: 1506-046 (S) Syntax error.
"/usr/include/sys/socket.h", line 139.2: 1506-046 (S) Syntax error.

Thanks in advance.

allen@mir.wustl.edu

-----------[000444][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 21:37:21 GMT
From:      Bob Stein <stein@gcomm.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Test - please ignore

Testing Netscape
gcomm.com - Bob Stein - stein@gcomm.com

-----------[000445][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 21:39:54 GMT
From:      Bob Stein <stein@gcomm.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Test - please ignore

Test message
munich.gcomm.com - Bob Stein - stein@gcomm.com

-----------[000446][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 21:40:58 GMT
From:      "Bob Stein (stein@gcomm.com)" <stein@gcomm.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Test message - please ignore

Test message
munich.gcomm.com - Bob Stein (stein@gcomm.com) - stein@gcomm.com

-----------[000447][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 18 Nov 1994 22:15:53 GMT
From:      rdenny@netcom.com (Robert Denny)
To:        comp.infosystems.www.providers,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Help! WinHTTPD w/socks to Netscape

In <1994Nov11.030230.219@exclbr.spcc.com> sean_shepard@mercury.spcc.com (Sean Shepard) writes:

>I am getting "TCP Error"s in NetScape trying to access an
>HTTPD server I am constructing on my Windows For Workgroups
>machine.  I am using HTTPD 1.3pre, TCP-32, and Windows for
>Workgroups on a Dell Pentium with a Cabletron 22 series 
>ethernet board.

TCP-32 has a bug that results in larger documents getting cut off at the
end, and indeed this sounds like your problem. One thing, you might get a
copy of the current beta (you are actually using a pre-release version from
July, the release was in August). The server's home page is at:

  http://www.alisa.com/win-httpd/

and it has news, FTP instructions, etc.

>I saw that was strange was that my PC would kick out a lot of
>1,518 byte packets and the NeXT didn't send packets that large.
>1,518 bytes is, of course, the maximum allowable by ethernet
>but would that cause any problems for WWW services???

Microsoft has told me that they will release an update to TCP-32 "soon".
Stay tuned to the server's home page (listed above) for news on the update
release.

  -- Bob

-----------[000448][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      18 Nov 1994 22:45:47 GMT
From:      Bob Stein <stein@gcomm.com>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: What address is 1.1.1.1?

> Our SNMP management software find this address in the routing tables
> of a router, though a ping 1.1.1.1 results in no answer.

I've heard of 1.1.1.1 being used to represent your address for dynamic
SLIP, that is, the address that will be assigned to you by your 
service provider each time you make your SLIP connection.  I seem
to recall hearing this in some instructions when I signed up on
free.org.

-- Bob Stein

-----------[000449][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 01:01:59 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.unix.programmer,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Select() on pipe() fd problem?

> A pipe is per default one-way. Do you use two pipes, one for 0 and one for 1 
> and 2? You can't use a pipe like, say, a tcp stream connection fd, where you
> can read AND write.

Pipes under SVR4 are indeed full-duplex.  Not that I advocate this, or
that it's portable, just that I'm sure some people assume this now ...

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000450][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 19 Nov 1994 03:29:21 GMT
From:      mkail@netcom.com (Mike D. Kail)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Address already in use message

Tom Denny (denny@hostfax.aifp.com) wrote:
> We have a concurrent server application in TCP/IP which binds to an address
> on a  well known port number.  When the application is killed, and then
> restarted, bind fails with the message "Address already in use".  We then
> either have to restart the machine or wait for 10-15 minutes before
> restarting the application.  Does anyone have any idea what might be
> causing this? 

Look at the man page for setsockopt()  You need to turn on SO_RESUSEADDR
-- 
/*-----------------------------------------*/
/*  Mike D. Kail     |   mkail@netcom.com  */
/*-----------------------------------------*/

-----------[000451][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 07:48:34 GMT
From:      agulbra@nvg.unit.no (Arnt Gulbrandsen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: passive ftp?

In article <3aglg4$ob4@dmsoproto.ida.org>,
Chuck Davisson <davisson@ida.org> wrote:
>Does anyone know of Mac and PC implementations of
>passive ftp?  We're implementing some changes and 
>ftp from our Mac and PC's won't work.  I've found
>some unix source code that almost works right, 
>but haven't had any luck with the other platforms.

If you found the same source that I did, I made it work right (had
to).  This is the patch I submitted just now for the linux ftp
client, hopefully it will go into other clients without much
trouble.  It also does a couple of other things that I consider
useful.

The top line contains MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS, that was nvg.unit.no (see my
From address): I hacked the ftp client to automatically login with a
good email address.

--Arnt

diff -rc ftp-orig/Makefile ftp/Makefile
*** ftp-orig/Makefile	Wed Jun  8 18:42:12 1994
--- ftp/Makefile	Sat Nov 19 05:21:43 1994
***************
*** 1,3 ****
--- 1,4 ----
+ CFLAGS += -DEMAILADDR=\"MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS\" -DRECVWINDOW=49152 -DSNDWINDOW=49152
  ifdef USE_GNU_READLINE
  CFLAGS += -D__USE_READLINE__ -Druserpass=x_ruserpass
  LDLIBS += -lreadline -ltermcap
diff -rc ftp-orig/cmds.c ftp/cmds.c
*** ftp-orig/cmds.c	Mon May 23 11:03:42 1994
--- ftp/cmds.c	Sat Nov 19 03:21:34 1994
***************
*** 2157,2159 ****
--- 2157,2174 ----
  		printf("Local file \"%s\" is newer than remote file \"%s\"\n",
  			argv[2], argv[1]);
  }
+ 
+ #ifndef NO_PASSIVE_MODE
+ /*
+  * Start up passive mode interaction
+  */
+ 
+ /*VARARGS*/
+ setpassive()
+ {
+ 
+ 	passivemode = !passivemode;
+ 	printf("Passive mode %s.\n", onoff(passivemode));
+ 	code = passivemode;
+ }
+ #endif
diff -rc ftp-orig/cmdtab.c ftp/cmdtab.c
*** ftp-orig/cmdtab.c	Mon May 23 11:03:42 1994
--- ftp/cmdtab.c	Sat Nov 19 03:21:34 1994
***************
*** 55,60 ****
--- 55,63 ----
  int	setsunique(), setrunique(), cdup(), macdef(), domacro();
  int	sizecmd(), modtime(), newer(), rmtstatus();
  int	do_chmod(), do_umask(), idle_cmd();
+ #ifndef NO_PASSIVE_MODE
+ int	setpassive();
+ #endif
  
  char	accounthelp[] =	"send account command to remote server";
  char	appendhelp[] =	"append to a file";
***************
*** 122,127 ****
--- 125,133 ----
  char	umaskhelp[] =	"get (set) umask on remote side";
  char	userhelp[] =	"send new user information";
  char	verbosehelp[] =	"toggle verbose mode";
+ #ifndef NO_PASSIVE_MODE
+ char	setpassivehelp[] = "toggle passive transfer mode";
+ #endif
  
  struct cmd cmdtab[] = {
  	{ "!",		shellhelp,	0,	0,	0,	shell },
***************
*** 166,171 ****
--- 172,180 ----
  	{ "ntrans",	ntranshelp,	0,	0,	1,	setntrans },
  	{ "open",	connecthelp,	0,	0,	1,	setpeer },
  	{ "prompt",	prompthelp,	0,	0,	0,	setprompt },
+ #ifndef NO_PASSIVE_MODE
+ 	{ "passive",	setpassivehelp,	0,	0,	0,	setpassive },
+ #endif
  	{ "proxy",	proxyhelp,	0,	0,	1,	doproxy },
  	{ "sendport",	porthelp,	0,	0,	0,	setport },
  	{ "put",	sendhelp,	1,	1,	1,	put },
diff -rc ftp-orig/ftp.1 ftp/ftp.1
*** ftp-orig/ftp.1	Fri Dec 17 08:11:31 1993
--- ftp/ftp.1	Sat Nov 19 04:56:49 1994
***************
*** 602,607 ****
--- 602,612 ----
  the
  .Tn FTP
  server (see below).
+ .It Ic passive
+ Toggle the use of passive mode.  When using passive mode,
+ the client initiates data connections, otherwise the server
+ does.  RFC 1579, "Firewall-friendly FTP" recommends using
+ passive mode.
  .It Ic prompt
  Toggle interactive prompting.
  Interactive prompting
diff -rc ftp-orig/ftp.c ftp/ftp.c
*** ftp-orig/ftp.c	Tue May 24 11:32:03 1994
--- ftp/ftp.c	Sat Nov 19 05:26:45 1994
***************
*** 192,197 ****
--- 192,199 ----
  	char *user, *pass, *acct, *getlogin(), *getpass();
  	int n, aflag = 0;
  
+ 	char *myname = getlogin();
+ 
  	user = pass = acct = 0;
  	if (ruserpass(host, &user, &pass, &acct) < 0) {
  		code = -1;
***************
*** 220,227 ****
  	n = command("USER %s", user);
  	if (n == CONTINUE) {
  		if (pass == NULL) {
! 			/* fflush(stdout); */
  			pass = getpass("Password:");
  		}
 n = command("PASS %s", pass);
  	}
--- 222,240 ----
  	n = command("USER %s", user);
  	if (n == CONTINUE) {
  		if (pass == NULL) {
! #ifdef EMAILADDR
! 			if ((strcmp(user, "ftp")==0) ||
! 			    (strcmp(user, "anonymous")==0)) {
! 				pass = (char *)malloc(10+strlen(EMAILADDR));
! 				strcpy(pass, myname);
! 				strcat(pass, "@" EMAILADDR);
! 				printf("Using %s as password.\n", pass);
! 			} else {
! 				pass = getpass("Password:");
! 			}
! #else
  			pass = getpass("Password:");
+ #endif
  		}
 n = command("PASS %s", pass);
  	}
***************
*** 1047,1055 ****
  initconn()
  {
  	register char *p, *a;
! 	int result, len, tmpno = 0;
  	int on = 1;
  
  noport:
  	data_addr = myctladdr;
  	if (sendport)
--- 1060,1125 ----
  initconn()
  {
  	register char *p, *a;
! 	int result, len, tmpno = 0, rwin;
  	int on = 1;
  
+ #ifndef NO_PASSIVE_MODE
+ 	int a1,a2,a3,a4,p1,p2;
+ 
+ 	if (passivemode) {
+ 		data = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
+ 		if (data < 0) {
+ 			perror("ftp: socket");
+ 			return(1);
+ 		}
+ 		if (options & SO_DEBUG &&
+ 		    setsockopt(data, SOL_SOCKET, SO_DEBUG, (char *)&on, sizeof (on)) < 0)
+ 			perror("ftp: setsockopt (ignored)");
+ 		if (command("PASV") != COMPLETE) {
+ 			printf("Passive mode refused.\n");
+ 			passivemode = 0;
+ 		}
+ 	}
+ 	if (passivemode) {
+ 
+ /*
+  * What we've got at this point is a string of comma separated
+  * one-byte unsigned integer values, separated by commas.
+  * The first four are the an IP address. The fifth is the MSB
+  * of the port number, the sixth is the LSB. From that we'll
+  * prepare a sockaddr_in.
+  */
+ 
+ 		if (sscanf(pasv,"%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d",&a1,&a2,&a3,&a4,&p1,&p2) != 6) {
+ 			printf("Passive mode address scan failure. Shouldn't happen!\n");
+ 			return(1);
+ 		};
+ 
+ 		data_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
+ 		data_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = 
+ 		    htonl( (a1<<24) + (a2<<16) + (a3<<8) + a4 );
+ /*
+ 		data_addr.sin_addr.S_un.S_un_b.s_b1 = a1;
+ 		data_addr.sin_addr.S_un.S_un_b.s_b2 = a2;
+ 		data_addr.sin_addr.S_un.S_un_b.s_b3 = a3;
+ 		data_addr.sin_addr.S_un.S_un_b.s_b4 = a4;
+ */
+ 		data_addr.sin_port = htons((p1<<8)|p2);
+ 
+ 		if (connect(data, (struct sockaddr *) &data_addr, sizeof(data_addr))<0) {
+ 			perror("ftp: connect");
+ 			abort_remote((FILE *)NULL);
+ 			passivemode = 0;
+ 			return(1);
+ 		}
+ #ifdef IP_TOS
+ 		on = IPTOS_THROUGHPUT;
+ 		if (setsockopt(data, IPPROTO_IP, IP_TOS, (char *)&on, sizeof(int)) < 0)
+ 			perror("ftp: setsockopt TOS (ignored)");
+ #endif
+ 		return(0);
+ #endif
+ 	}
  noport:
  	data_addr = myctladdr;
  	if (sendport)
***************
*** 1075,1080 ****
--- 1145,1156 ----
  	if (options & SO_DEBUG &&
  	    setsockopt(data, SOL_SOCKET, SO_DEBUG, (char *)&on, sizeof (on)) < 0)
  		perror("ftp: setsockopt (ignored)");
+ #ifdef RECVWINDOW
+ 	rwin = RECVWINDOW;
+ 	if (setsockopt(data, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVBUF, 
+ 	    (char *)&rwin, sizeof(rwin)) < 0)
+ 		perror("ftp: setsockopt (SO_RCVBUF) -- ignored");
+ #endif
  	len = sizeof (data_addr);
  	if (getsockname(data, (struct sockaddr *)&data_addr, &len) < 0) {
  		perror("ftp: getsockname");
***************
*** 1118,1124 ****
--- 1194,1207 ----
  {
  	struct sockaddr_in from;
  	int s, fromlen = sizeof (from), tos;
+ #ifdef SNDWINDOW
+ 	int swin;
+ #endif
  
+ #ifndef NO_PASSIVE_MODE
+ if (passivemode)
+ 	return (fdopen(data, lmode));
+ #endif
  	s = accept(data, (struct sockaddr *) &from, &fromlen);
  	if (s < 0) {
  		perror("ftp: accept");
***************
*** 1127,1132 ****
--- 1210,1221 ----
  	}
  	(void) close(data);
  	data = s;
+ #ifdef SNDWINDOW
+ 	swin = SNDWINDOW;
+ 	if (setsockopt(data, SOL_SOCKET, SO_SNDBUF, 
+ 	    (char *)&swin, sizeof(swin)) < 0)
+ 		perror("ftp: setsockopt (SO_SNDBUF) -- ignored");
+ #endif
  #ifdef IP_TOS
  	tos = IPTOS_THROUGHPUT;
  	if (setsockopt(s, IPPROTO_IP, IP_TOS, (char *)&tos, sizeof(int)) < 0)
diff -rc ftp-orig/ftp_var.h ftp/ftp_var.h
*** ftp-orig/ftp_var.h	Mon May 23 11:03:42 1994
--- ftp/ftp_var.h	Sat Nov 19 03:22:56 1994
***************
*** 68,73 ****
--- 68,76 ----
  int	code;			/* return/reply code for ftp command */
  int	crflag;			/* if 1, strip car. rets. on ascii gets */
  char	pasv[64];		/* passive port for proxy data connection */
+ #ifndef NO_PASSIVE_MODE
+ int	passivemode;		/* passive mode enabled */
+ #endif
  char	*altarg;		/* argv[1] with no shell-like preprocessing  */
  char	ntin[17];		/* input translation table */
  char	ntout[17];		/* output translation table */
diff -rc ftp-orig/main.c ftp/main.c
*** ftp-orig/main.c	Mon May 23 11:03:43 1994
--- ftp/main.c	Sat Nov 19 03:21:33 1994
***************
*** 128,133 ****
--- 128,136 ----
  		verbose++;
  	cpend = 0;	/* no pending replies */
  	proxy = 0;	/* proxy not active */
+ #ifndef NO_PASSIVE_MODE
+ 	passivemode = 1; /* passive mode active */
+ #endif
  	crflag = 1;	/* strip c.r. on ascii gets */
  	sendport = -1;	/* not using ports */
  	/*

-----------[000452][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 19 Nov 1994 08:01:41 GMT
From:      sar@plc.com (Steve Rago)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.unix.programmer,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Select() on pipe() fd problem?

In article <1994Nov18.140608.15575@zh014.ubs.ubs.ch> urs.eberle@zhflur.ubs.ubs.ch writes:
>Paul Smith (cgi@crl.com) wrote:
>..
>: Run a program that creates a pipe fd from pipe(), and forks.  The child dup()s
>: the pipe fd to 0,1,2 and then exec()'s $SHELL -c program a b c.  
>A pipe is per default one-way. Do you use two pipes, one for 0 and one for 1 
>and 2? You can't use a pipe like, say, a tcp stream connection fd, where you
>can read AND write.

Actually, you can.  In SVR4, pipes are full-duplex.

Steve Rago
sar@plc.com

-----------[000453][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 19 Nov 1994 20:46:02 -0600
From:      scouten@uiuc.edu (Eric Scouten)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stupid telnet negotiation question...

In article <3ajdt0$2slg@ns2.CC.Lehigh.EDU>, gfm2@ns2.CC.Lehigh.EDU (GEORGE
F. V MOTTER) wrote:

> I am writing a program in Windows and part of it needs to telnet into a Linux
> server on port 23, login, and fork to another program.  I have very little
> experience in writing telnet code so I have a stupid question.
> 
> I connect to port 23, negotiate my little heart out, but I have no clue how to
> tell the Linux box that "I'm sick of negotiating, give me the darn login
> prompt!"  What is the command sequence?

You don't. Your Telnet client *MUST* properly interpret and respond to
every option negotiation request that it gets from the server, even if
just to say "no, I can't do that." Some Telnet servers will refuse to
connect to clients unless the offer a certain minimum set of services.
You'll have to experiment to find out what constitutes the "minimum set"
for Linux.

If you have access to a WWW client, I've created a web page which points
to all of the Telnet RFCs. This page was updated last week to include new
RFCs describing some new Telnet options.

   http://tampico.cso.uiuc.edu/~scouten/mactcp/spec/telnet.html

(This is part of a Macintosh TCP Programmer's Reference Guide. Most of the
rest of the guide will not be of interest to you, but this page is
platform-neutral.)

-es

__________________________________________________________________________
Eric Scouten                                      e-mail: scouten@uiuc.edu    
MS Comp Sci '96, U of Illinois        http://tampico.cso.uiuc.edu/~scouten
To start with, we must stop using students as the _escape_ goats.
   -Anonymous response to student survey

-----------[000454][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 11:58:40 GMT
From:      erik@xs4all.nl (Erik Bos)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP - Virtual IP addresses

frank@beach.silcom.com (Frank Dziuba) writes:

>haltarac@rain.org wrote:
>: Frank Dziuba (frank@beach.silcom.com) wrote:
>: : Hi,
 
>: : I want to be able to have a host machine act as if it has several IP 
>: : addresses so I can have an HTTP daemon(s) serve data from different
>: : directories depending on what 'host' they were connected as. 
 
>: It looks complicated. Why would you need this. If your goal is to hide
>: some parts of the directory names behind an IP address, then
>: you can problably make something more elegant by just mounting those
>: directories just under /
 
>No, the goal is to allow a machine to accept a connection on port 80
>using the http daemon, and allow the daemon to determine, by the IP address,
>what pages it should serve. For example, many systems have multiple domains
>which point to them, and they want you to be able to say something like
>"http://www.xyz.com/" or "http://www.abc.com/" and be able to serve you
>a _different_ home page each time. Unfortunatly, the HTTP protocol does
>not send the "www.xyz.com" part of the request to the daemon, it simply
>sends the "/" request to whatever daemon it finds at the _IP_ address
>that those names resolve to.
 
>That's why you'll often see sites with addresses like "http://www.abc.com/abc"
>which is pointing to the "abc" directory. To a user who is trying to "guess"
>a company's web address, this is not an obvious guess. They would be more
>apt to guess "www.abc.com" for the "abc"company, and end up getting the
>general home page for "The Mall network"  that the pages are hosted on.
 
>Most major companies do _not_ want to be part of a "mall", they want to have
>their own presence. However, maintaining 100 servers for 100 companies is a
>lot more work than maintainig 1 server with multiple IP addresses.

You can also use setup a small http-server at www.abc.com that send
a http-relocation for each page to "http://server.com/abc/". Using
this trick www.abc.com will be accessed when for retrieving /, all
pages are served from server.com



--
Erik Bos	<erik@xs4all.nl>	http://www.xs4all.nl/~erik/


-----------[000455][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 12:59:19 GMT
From:      agulbra@nvg.unit.no (Arnt Gulbrandsen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: udp-checksum?

In article <3ai9n2$uol@anl433.erlm.siemens.de>,
Schmitz <schmitzo@europa1.erlm.siemens.de> wrote:
>does anyone knows that it is correct to implement a UDP-stack
>without a checksum?

It is partially allowed, but I wouldn't say correct.

The RFCs allow sending UDP without the checksum (with 0 in the
checksum field), but think (not sure though) they require you to
check that any incoming checksum is correct.

--Arnt

-----------[000456][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 11:51:48 +0100
From:      szymon@uci.agh.edu.pl (Szymon Sokol)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.dcom.sys.cisco
Subject:   Re: secondary routing reference

Tony Rall (trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com) wrote:
: In article <1994Nov14.164741@acad.drake.edu>,
: George W. Miller <gm0551s@acad.drake.edu> wrote:
: >
: >Can anyone give me a good reference on secondary routing so we may have
: >different ip network numbers on the same wire?
 
: "Secondary routing"?  I've never heard that term applied to having 2
: logical nets on the same physical net.  To me it would mean something
: closer to backup routing, but that does not imply multiple nets per
: net.

This is a term used specifically by Cisco (actually, it is "secondary adress"
not "secondary routing"): you assign TWO (or more) different IP addresses to
the same interface. I do not know any other device than Cisco routers that 
would allow this, so this question probably belongs to comp.dcom.sys.cisco
(and I changed Newsgroups: appriopriately).
--
                        Szymon Sokol -- Network Manager
U     U M     M M     M University of Mining and Metallurgy, Computer Center
U     U MM   MM MM   MM ave. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow, POLAND
U     U M M M M M M M M TEL. +48 12 338100 EXT. 2885  FAX +48 12 338907
 UUUUU  M  M  M M  M  M finger szymon@galaxy.uci.agh.edu.pl for PGP key
                        WWW page: http://www.uci.agh.edu.pl/~szymon/

-----------[000457][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 15:13:01 GMT
From:      john@iastate.edu (John Hascall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: All or nothing write to BSD socket

In article <3aiksl$1b9@munich.gcomm.com>, stein  <stein@gcomm.com> wrote:
}> Is there some way that a socket can be set that if a write can't fully
}> complete (write all of the bytes you asked it to write) you can get
}> a -1 back or something, instead of doing a partial write?  I have looked
}> at setsockopt() and ioctl() and can't find anything.
 
}Both are noble and reasonable, but apparently not possible.  I wanted
}to do both with our TCP/IP stack, Piper/IP which is based on BSD Unix,
}but came to find there is no way.  The best you can do is select(),
}which will tell you whether you can send 1 or more bytes or not.

(I know jack squat about Piper/IP, but if its really BSDish...)
From /usr/include/sys/socketvar.h :

/* can we write something to so? */
#define sowriteable(so) \
    (sbspace(&(so)->so_snd) > (so)->so_snd.sb_lowat && \
        (((so)->so_state&SS_ISCONNECTED) || \
          ((so)->so_proto->pr_flags&PR_CONNREQUIRED)==0) || \
     ((so)->so_state & SS_CANTSENDMORE))

Note the test:

    sbspace(&(so)->so_snd) > (so)->so_snd.sb_lowat

See also get/setsockopt(SO_SNDLOWAT).

John
-- 
John Hascall                   ``An ill-chosen word is the fool's messenger.''

Systems Software Engineer, ISU Comp Center  +  Ames, IA  50011  +  515/294-9551
& Hascall Systems - Unix/C/Internet Consulting, Training, Custom Programming

-----------[000458][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 19 Nov 1994 15:26:21 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: secondary routing reference

In article <3aklc4$mov@galaxy.uci.agh.edu.pl> szymon@uci.agh.edu.pl (Szymon Sokol) writes:

>: "Secondary routing"?  I've never heard that term applied to having 2
>: logical nets on the same physical net.  To me it would mean something
>: closer to backup routing, but that does not imply multiple nets per
>: net.
>
>This is a term used specifically by Cisco (actually, it is "secondary adress"
>not "secondary routing"): you assign TWO (or more) different IP addresses to
>the same interface. I do not know any other device than Cisco routers that 
>would allow this, so this question probably belongs to comp.dcom.sys.cisco
>(and I changed Newsgroups: appriopriately).

For many years, many BSD-based UNIX systems have allowed more than one
IP address to be assigned to a single network interface.  Sometimes you
used `route add 1.2.3.4 0`.  More recently you use something like
`ifconfig xx0 1.2.3.4 alias`.  (Yes, the results of those two are not
quite identical.)


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000459][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 17:46:36 GMT
From:      bass@cais2.cais.com (Tim Bass (Network Systems Engineer))
To:        comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic

HPs NetMetrix (runs on HPs and Suns) will do the trick you ask,
but it is expensive.


Doug McPherson (dougm@delphi.com) wrote:

: I've been able to use RMON tools to meaure the traffic on my network segments, 
: and I can tell that TCP/IP is using n% of my traffic.  What I *can't*
: tell from these tools is *which* TCP/IP applications are consuming that n %?!
: I.e. I'd like to be able to break the TCP/IP traffic down into
: source/destination groupings, based on the TCP/IP application (e.g.
: telnet, ftp, HTTP,Doom, etc).
 
: Are there tools out there than can "massage" this data out of my RMON probes or
: do I need to use yet another application to gather this data?
 
: I'm currently looking at NNstat to gather the data.  It's free, it runs on my 
: Alpha systems, but it's pretty "low to the ground".   If there are
: similar applications out there that will let me analyze multiple
: segments of TCP/IP traffic, and are easier to install/configure than
: NNstat, I'd very much like to
: know.
 
: "Off the rack" applications would be preferred.
 
: Also I don't get to read news as much as I would like, so if you can
: follow up in email, that'd be great.  When I get a chance, I'll post a
: summary of reponses back here.
 
: Thanks in advance and regards!
 
: /doug
 
: --
:  +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
:  | Doug McPherson                       Delphi Internet Services   |
:  | Email: dougm@delphi.com              1030 Massachusetts Avenue  |
:  | Phone: (617) 441-4565                Cambridge, MA 02138        |
:  | FAX: (617) 491-6642                                             |
:  +-----------------------------------------------------------------+

-----------[000460][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 18:39:06 GMT
From:      lprimak@hope.nyc.ny.us (Leonard Primak)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: udp-checksum?

Absolutely not!
UDP programs expect that if the packet got there, it has the right data
in it.  It could not get there, or the packet order could be shuffled.  that's
about it.

In article <3ai9n2$uol@anl433.erlm.siemens.de>, schmitzo@europa1.erlm.siemens.de (Schmitz) writes:
|> 
|> Hi there,
|> does anyone knows that it is correct to implement a UDP-stack
|> without a checksum?
 
-- 
					Leonard Primak
					CS First Boston

-----------[000461][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 18:31:41 +0100
From:      zok@ins.net (Andreas Frackowiak)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Class C subnetting

loiselle@charm.gandalf.ca (Vance Loiselle) writes:
>From what's been discussed, if an organization has one class c
>net of 199.99.166.X and wishes to subnet further, the mask of
>255.255.255.192 provides them with two subnets, 62 hosts each.
>Ques: Would a mask of 255.255.255.128 be useless? No allowable
>subnet values?

With a netmask of ...192 (2 bits subnet-part 6 bits host-part)
You have 4 subnets of a C-class net with each 64 numbers (62 hosts) each.
With a netmask of ...128 (1 bit subnet-part 7 bits host-part)
You have 2 subnets of a C-class net with 128 numbers (126 hosts) each.

>Now, what if instead the organization was given a single subnetted
>class b address, say 134.87.207.X with a mask of 255.255.255.0

Its the same as above.

>I can't figure out if the fact that the base net number is class b
>changes these issues.

The "base net number" does not change these issues.
The "A,B,C" network classes are just defined to easily determine
the netmask from the ip-number, to structure the "ip-number namespace". 
With subnetting/supernetting You define the netmask at Your local network,
no longer using the "default" A,B,C-class netmask.

Andreas

-- 
"Many people naively believe that the famous OSI seven-layer
architecture [...] requires layered implementation" - C. Partridge

Inter Networking Systems                         Internet Services & Consulting
FAX: +49-2305-25411                                                info@ins.net

-----------[000462][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 06:26:56 -0600
From:      hahne@goemon.gol.com (Bruce M. Hahne)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sys.mac.apps,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Dial-on demand PPP for Macintosh LAN?

Sorry if this question belongs elsewhere, but I think I'm hitting in the
right vicinity with my choice of newsgroups.  So far I've checked the
comp.sys.mac.comm FAQ, Eric Behr's MacTCP info file, and MacWorld's
"Networking Bible" looking for an answer to no avail.

BACKGROUND:  Under Unix (my site uses BSD386), it's possible to
configure a machine as a gateway to the Internet and run dial-on-demand
SLIP or PPP from the Unix box.  In other words, I could have a LAN, and
the Unix box watches the IP traffic on the LAN, and whenever the Unix
system sees a packet which needs to go out to the Internet, the Unix box
dials out on a modem and establishes a PPP connection with an upstream
provider.

QUESTION:  Is similar software available for a Macintosh?  I'm advising
a company which has about 15 Macs on an ethernet LAN and wants Internet
connectivity.  They've got a spare machine they could dedicate to
serving as a PPP/router/dial-up machine, but if the software doesn't
exist then they'll have to go with a (more expensive) dedicated
dial-on-demand router.  They're trying to keep costs low, so the
Mac-based solution is preferrable if it's available.

Will TCP/Connect II handle dial-on-demand IP routing for a LAN?  Does
anybody's software do this?

Thanks in advance for any pointers!

Please send responses via email if at all possible; we get our news from
Netcom which has had MAJOR news problems over the past 10 days.  I will
happily post a summary on request.

Thanks,
Bruce Hahne
hahne@gol.com

-----------[000463][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 21:17:24 GMT
From:      bward01@ibm.net
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Subnetting question

I need to add TCPIP support to a Novell network. 

I have one class C license. This site has 4 networks that uses the netware 3.11 
servers as routers.

If I use a subnet mask of 255.255.255.224 this will give 3 bits for the subnet number.

However,  I read somewhere that I can't use subnet numbers of all zero's or all ones
and this would limit me to 6 subnets instead of 8.

Is this true? 

Thanks in advance.

-----------[000464][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 21:23:36 GMT
From:      mgleason@cse.unl.edu (Mike Gleason)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: passive ftp?

agulbra@nvg.unit.no (Arnt Gulbrandsen) writes:

|If you found the same source that I did, I made it work right (had
|to).  This is the patch I submitted just now for the linux ftp
|client, hopefully it will go into other clients without much
|trouble.  It also does a couple of other things that I consider
|useful.
 
|The top line contains MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS, that was nvg.unit.no (see my
|From address): I hacked the ftp client to automatically login with a
|good email address.

Have you tried my freeware ncftp client lately?

	ftp://ftp.cs.unl.edu/pub/ncftp/ncftp.tgz

It does passive FTP, runs on linux, and does much more.

--
===== Mike Gleason <mgleason@cse.unl.edu> ================= Go Huskers! =======
Current version of NcFTP is 1.8.6, and is available from FTP.CS.UNL.EDU, in the
/pub/ncftp directory.  Pre-release versions of NcFTP 2.0.0 are available in the /pub/ncftp/BETA directory.

-----------[000465][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sat, 19 Nov 1994 21:25:17 GMT
From:      ben@rex.uokhsc.edu (Benjamin Z. Goldsteen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stupid telnet negotiation question...

gfm2@ns2.CC.Lehigh.EDU (GEORGE F. V MOTTER) writes:


>I am writing a program in Windows and part of it needs to telnet into a Linux
>server on port 23, login, and fork to another program.  I have very little
                               ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^consider using "rsh"
or "rexec"

>experience in writing telnet code so I have a stupid question.
 
>I connect to port 23, negotiate my little heart out, but I have no clue how to
>tell the Linux box that "I'm sick of negotiating, give me the darn login
>prompt!"  What is the command sequence?
 
>Thanks for the info.

Get the Telnet package from Cray (ftp.cray.com:/src/telnet) or BSD (BSD
4.4, NetBSD, FreeBSD, I don't know whose is the best).  I am not saying
you have done anything wrong, but I am tired of seeing broken TELNET
clients and servers (and any and every company has released a broken
TELNET-related program!).  It is too easy to screw up.  Try to start
from something that already works...

However, while I am no expert in TELNET, a quick browse (reinforced by
experience with TELNET in general) of some older Cray TELNET sources
suggests to me that options can be negotiated at any time.  In other
words, the server decides "I'm sick of negotiating, here is the darn
login prompt!" If the Linux box is not giving you a banner or "login:",
then you probably got yourself into a negotiation loop.

I have nearly 60 RFC's and related material covering TELNET (I never
read them either...) if you would like.  The reason why I have so many
is that I have some of the obsolete RFC's.  Also, some options have
their own RFC's.

Best regards,
-- 
Benjamin Z. Goldsteen

-----------[000466][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      19 Nov 1994 22:35:27 GMT
From:      Derek_T.L._Kwan@galaxy.com (Derek T.L. Kwan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Looking for software....

Hi there:

Right now I'm looking for the following Windows software for PC, can anyone
tell me where to find them? (Prefer shareware...)

SLIP server
SMTP server
NNTP server
FTP server
FINGER server

Thanks in advance

Derek

-----------[000467][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 02:36:51 GMT
From:      ian@rocket.cc.umr.edu (Ian Koenig)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Sockets???


I am working on getting sockets or something to that extent to work on 
a SunOS 5.3 system.  I have been able to complie and have work correctly this
same program on our HP/8000 machine (I think that is the right x000)

I basically just need to know what i need to look for or proper man pages
but I am definitly interested in anything anyone has to contribute.

here is the server code for my program.  It is an example program from my
socket howto guide and I can not get that to work sooooo... 

#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#define  MYPORT    1066


main()
  {
    int    sd, ns;
    char   buf[256];
    struct sockaddr sockaddr;
    int    fromlen;

    struct   servent      *sp;
    struct   hostent      *hp;
    struct   sockaddr_in  sin;

    sd = socket(AF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0);

 
    /* port information */
    hp     = gethostbyname("saucer");


    bzero((char *)&sin, sizeof(sin));
    bcopy(hp->h_addr, (char *) &sin.sin_addr, hp->h_length);
    sin.sin_port      = MYPORT;
    sin.sin_family    = hp->h_addrtype;

    if (bind(sd, (char *)&sin, sizeof(sin)) == -1)
      {
        perror("error in bind");
        exit();
      }

    listen(sd,1);
 
    for(;;)
      {
        ns = accept(sd,&sockaddr   ,&fromlen       );
        write(ns,"Hello",5);
        read(ns,buf,sizeof(buf));
        printf(" %s\n",buf);
        close(ns);
      }
    }


and this is the client side.
/* p191 elementary handout */

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>

#include <netdb.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#define  MYPORT    1066



main()
  {
    int    sd;
    char   buf[256];
    struct servent       *sp;
    struct hostent       *hp;
    struct sockaddr_in   sin;

    sd = socket(AF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0);
    
    /* get the host information including IP address */
    hp = gethostbyname("saucer");

    bzero((char *)&sin,sizeof(sin));
  
    /* Copy the IP address in hp to sin */
    bcopy(hp->h_addr, (char *)&sin.sin_addr, hp->h_length);

    /* assign port ID */
    sin.sin_port = MYPORT;

    /* specify address type */
    sin.sin_family = hp->h_addrtype;

    /* note sin variable used in connect */
    if (connect(sd,(char *)&sin,sizeof(sin)) == -1)
      {
        perror("Bad connection");
        exit();
      }

    read(sd,buf,sizeof(buf));
    printf("Client receives %s\n",buf);
    write(sd,"World",5);
    close(sd);
  }


any help is greatly appreciated.

thanks
ian

ian@umr.edu
 --

Here is my signature file, yes it needs some help, and the doctor says I
will be out of rehab in a couple of weeks.
------------
"You know you gotta be tough when you go up against a barrage of laser
weapons with a puny little sword.  "  
		-Chris DeBons paraphrasing Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi
------------
Now are you going to come quietly or do I have to wear ear plugs? 

-----------[000468][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 03:30:19 GMT
From:      david_diamond@skymir.usc.edu (David Diamond)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Looking for SMTP example...

Can someone post some code (C, Pascal, BASIC, english) that might give
an example of an actual SMTP session sending mail?  I need to have 4th
Dimension (Mac database) send email.  I have the TCP/IP externals for
it and I'm wondering how much of a challege this would be.  What I'd
like to do is have 4D send the message with the addresses (many) to one
of our campus mail servers and let that mail server deal with getting
it out.  Essentially have 4D act as our local SMTP gateway does.

David Diamond                                           ____
Technology Services Coordinator                         \  /
USC News Service - University of Southern California     \/
(213) 740-2215                                            

-----------[000469][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 20 Nov 94 12:57:03 PDT
From:      bvs@ver.com
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip, bvs@ver.com
Subject:   where is the archive?




Where is the archive for this group?

I looked in the FAQ, and asked archie, but could not find the FTP
site for comp.protocols.tcp-ip.

Thanks in advance.

-----------[000470][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 10:37:09 GMT
From:      stefano@di.unipi.it (Stefano Suin)
To:        comp.protocols.nfs,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Bootpd foe Windows for workgroup


Hi all, Can anyone tell me if a bootp server for Windows or Windows
for workgroup it's available?  I would like to use a diskless PC with WFG,
booting form an other PC running WFG.

Any help is appreciated. 


stefano


--


                                  /\
                                 / \@
                                /   \
                              (( ~ ~ ))
                               (  ^  )
 ---------------------------o00O-----O00o------------------------------
|    Stefano Suin                 %%                                   |
|   UNIX System Manager           %%  E-mail=stefano@di.unipi.it       |
|Department of Computer Science   %%         stefano@unipi.it          |
|   University of Pisa            %%                                   |
|	   &			  %%				       |
|UnipiNet Manager (SERRA service) %%  Tel 39-50-887219		       | 
|   Corso Italia, 40              %%  fax 39-50-887226                 |
|    Pisa    (ITALY)              %%                                   |
 ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                            (__|!    !|__)



-----------[000471][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 21:26:35 -0500
From:      ajguido@cnj.digex.net (A.J. Guido)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.lans.misc,comp.unix.admin
Subject:   DHCP Info ???


I'm looking for any info on DHCP ( Dynamic Host Configuration 
Protocol). I have RFC1531, so I sort of know how the protocol 
works, but what I'm really after is real-world experience.  Has 
anyone successfully implemented DHCP? If so, with what products?
Which routers support it ? How does it work, or not work, with DNS, 
NIS, etc?? Or if anyone can point me to a possible source of info, 
I would greatly appreciate it.  Thank you very much in advance !!!


A.J. Guido

-----------[000472][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 15:56:30 GMT
From:      shafto@aristotle.ils.nwu.edu (Eric Shafto)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Bootp part of Netware/IP?

Does it come with bootp?  Is there a bootp NLM available otherwise?
Failing either of those, is there a bootp FAQ to help me set it up on
my Unix host?

-----------[000473][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 16:44:58 GMT
From:      david_diamond@skymir.usc.edu (David Diamond)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Need a copy of RFC 882

Where would I find this?

David Diamond                                           ____
Technology Services Coordinator                         \  /
USC News Service - University of Southern California     \/
(213) 740-2215                                            

-----------[000474][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 20 Nov 1994 16:54:48 GMT
From:      adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Class C subnetting

In article <3alcpt$5a9@popp.ins.de>,
                Andreas Frackowiak <zok@ins.net> wrote:

>loiselle@charm.gandalf.ca (Vance Loiselle) writes:
>>From what's been discussed, if an organization has one class c
>>net of 199.99.166.X and wishes to subnet further, the mask of
>>255.255.255.192 provides them with two subnets, 62 hosts each.
>>Ques: Would a mask of 255.255.255.128 be useless? No allowable
>>subnet values?
>
>With a netmask of ...192 (2 bits subnet-part 6 bits host-part)
>You have 4 subnets of a C-class net with each 64 numbers (62 hosts) each.
 
>With a netmask of ...128 (1 bit subnet-part 7 bits host-part)
>You have 2 subnets of a C-class net with 128 numbers (126 hosts) each.
>

A net directed broadcast to x.y.z.255 implies all hosts on (and all
subnets of) net x.y.z This would clash with a subnet directed broadcast
to subnet x.y.z.3. I assumed for similar reasons, subnet 0 is not
allowed either as a conseqence of historical useage for broadcasts, and
now notational network id use.

The exact mechanics of this would to some extent I think depend upon how
a gateway went about forwarding such directed broadcasts.

This would imply that a Netmask of ...192 applied to a Class C net or an
8 bit subnet of a Class B net would only yield two fully useable
subnets.

This would also imply the netmasks of ...128 in above case would yield
no useable subnets. (Note: I say useable, one *could* put machines on
subnets all 1s and all 0s but it I think it would lead to ambiguous
directed broadcasting.)

I look at subnet (and hosts) counting in terms of

  subnets = (1 << num_bits_for_subnetid) - 2; or for hosts:
    hosts = (1 << num_bits_for_hostid) - 2;

The -2 is to reserve the all 1s and all 0s bit combinations.

If my understanding *is* wrong, I appologise for confusing the issue,
and would appreciate a definitive answer from one who is 100% certain.

-- 
Adam

=======================================================================
| Computech  Tel/Fax: 0181 673 7817  email: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk |
=======================================================================

-----------[000475][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 15:18:32 +0100
From:      roque@master.di.fc.ul.pt (Pedro Roque Marques)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   RFC 1063


I'd like to know if the usual IP implementations do implement RFC 1063 -
Probe MTU Option. 
Witch routers do implement this and witch hosts ?

-- 
	Pedro Roque (roque@di.fc.ul.pt)


-----------[000476][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 17:39:07 GMT
From:      john@iastate.edu (John Hascall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stupid telnet negotiation question...

Eric Scouten <scouten@uiuc.edu> wrote:
}gfm2@ns2.CC.Lehigh.EDU (GEORGE F. V MOTTER) wrote:
}>I am writing a program in Windows and part of it needs to telnet into a Linux
}>server on port 23, login, and fork to another program.  I have very little
}>experience in writing telnet code so I have a stupid question.
 
}>I connect to port 23, negotiate my little heart out, but I have no clue how
}>to tell the Linux box that "I'm sick of negotiating, give me the darn login
}>prompt!"  What is the command sequence?
 
}You don't. Your Telnet client *MUST* properly interpret and respond to
}every option negotiation request that it gets from the server, even if
}just to say "no, I can't do that."

  On the other hand, the negotiation should be finite -- the other
  end is basically limited to asking you about each option once<1>.

  If you see the same option negotiated more than once, then one or
  both implementations are broken.

John
---------------------
<1> An option can be renegotiated if something has changed since it
    was last negotiated -- typically something external to the program,
    for example, a user request ("telnet> mode line"), a program
    request (TIOCSETP/NOECHO), a system request (SIGWINCH).
-- 
John Hascall                   ``An ill-chosen word is the fool's messenger.''

Systems Software Engineer, ISU Comp Center  +  Ames, IA  50011  +  515/294-9551
& Hascall Systems - Unix/C/Internet Consulting, Training, Custom Programming

-----------[000477][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Sun, 20 Nov 1994 17:48:12 GMT
From:      adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Address already in use message

In article <denny.785194315@hostfax>,
                Tom Denny <denny@hostfax.aifp.com> wrote:

>We have a concurrent server application in TCP/IP which binds to an address
>on a  well known port number.  When the application is killed, and then
>restarted, bind fails with the message "Address already in use".  We then
>either have to restart the machine or wait for 10-15 minutes before
>restarting the application.  Does anyone have any idea what might be
>causing this? 
>

Your application is probably forgetting to close the listen() socket as
well as accept()ed sockets, or is just doing a shutdown on it.

I had this once...

What I normally do with servers is to initialise the server socket
number to -1 and on exit close() if server_socket >= 0.

-- 
Adam

=======================================================================
| Computech  Tel/Fax: 0181 673 7817  email: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk |
=======================================================================

-----------[000478][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 20:50:15 GMT
From:      mtl1@Isis.MsState.Edu (Michael Todd Lattanzi)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP/IP Information needed

I want to write some software which communicated with a proprietary piece 
of hardware through TCP/IP.  Can anyone tell me where I can get a copy 
of the TCP/IP protocol?


Thanks,
Todd Lattanzi
lattanzi@ee.msstate.edu


-----------[000479][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 22:17:38 GMT
From:      ard@cs.waikato.ac.nz (Andrew Donkin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.infosystems.www.providers
Subject:   RFC-1413 (ex. 931) server code?

This feels like a FAQ, but I haven't seen mention of it anywhere, so I'll
stick my head out and ask it anyway.

I want to run a server to deal with RFC931-style requests, initially so
that our machines can tell HTTP servers who is requesting pages.  I'm sure
we'll come up with more uses later.

I also understand RFC-931 has been superceded by 1413.

Are there sample implementations?  Even better, is there a Solaris 2
implementation, or SVR4 source that I can start from?

Many thanks in advance -

--
,------------------------------------------------------------------------,
|                   Andrew Donkin - ard@cs.waikato.ac.nz                 |
|          Department of Computer Science, University of Waikato         |
 `------------------------------------------------------------------------'

-----------[000480][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 10:19:37 -0700
From:      tho@carbon.denver.colorado.edu (Tuan Thanh Ho)
To:        comp.lang.modula3,comp.lang.modula2,comp.lang.oberon,comp.object,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer,comp.dcom.telecom.tech
Subject:   <>**!! Computer Books 4 Sale !!**<>


I have the following books for sale :

Please note the book condition:

Brand New = (!)
Excellent = (****)
Good      = (***)
Average   = (**)
Poor      = (*)

All books are hard bound unless otherwise noted.

- S. Atre, Data Base: Structured Techniques for Design, Performance, and
  Management, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1988, $25 (!).

- K. Kummerle, J. O. Limb, F. A. Tobagi, eds., Advances in Local Area
  Networks, IEEE Press, 1987, $19 (****).

- J. W. L. Ogilvie, Modula-2 Programming, McGraw Hill, 1985, $19 (!).

- W. Stallings, Local and Metropolitan Area Networks, 4th ed., Macmillan,
  1993, $25 (!).

- W. H. Inmon and J. H. Caplan, Information Systems Architecture, John Wiley
  & Sons, 1992, $25 (!).

- D. C. Andrews, and N. S. Leventhal, Fusion: Integrated IE, CASE, and JAD -
  A Handbook for Reengineering The Systems Organization, Yourdon Press
  Computing Series, Yourdon Press, 1993, $25 (!).  

- R. Sedgewick, Algorithms in Modula-3, Addison Wesley, 1993, $25 (!).

- J. T. Arnold, Simplified Digital Automation with Microprocessors,
  Academic Press, 1979, $19 (****).

- V. Milutinovic, ed., Introduction to Microprogramming, Prentice Hall, 
  1992, $25 (!).

- J. Kirkwood, Sybase Architecture and Administration, Ellis Horwood, 1993,
  $25 (!).

- N. Wirth, and J. Gutknecht, Project Oberon: The Design of an Operating
  System and Compiler, Addison Wesley, 1992, $25 (!).

- M. M. Gorman, Enterprise Database in a Client/Server Environment, John
  Wiley & Sons, 1994, $25 (!).

- S. Bapat, Object-Oriented Networks: Models for Architecture, Operations,
  and Management, Prentice Hall, 1994, $25 (!).

- D. E. Thomas and P. Moorby, The Verilog Hardware Description Language,
  Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1991, $25 (!).

- D. E. Comer and D. L. Stevens, Internetworking with TCP/IP: Design,   
  Implementation, and Internals, Vol. II, Prentice Hall, 1991, $25 (!).

- R. C. Camp, T. A. Smay, and C. J. Triska, Microprocessor Systems 
  Engineering, Matrix Publishers, 1979, $19 (***).

- P. Coad and E. Yourdon, Object-Oriented Analysis, Prentice Hall, 1991,
  $25 (!).

- S. Carl-Mitchell and J. S. Quarterman, Practical Internetworking with
  TCP/IP and UNIX, Addison Wesley, 1993, $25 (!).

- F. Hayes-Roth, D. A. Waterman, and D. B. Lenat, eds., Building Expert
  Systems, Addison Wesley, 1983, $19 (****).

- J. A. Aseltine, W. R. Beam, J. D. Palmer, and A. P. Sage, Introduction
  to Computer Systems Analysis, Design, and Applications, John Wiley & Sons,
  1989, $19 (!).

- J. Martin, Telecommunications and the Computer, 3rd ed., Prentice Hall,
  1990, $25 (!).

- J. Martin, K. K. Chapman, and J. Leben, Systems Application Architecture,
  Common Communications Support: Distributed Applications, Prentice Hall,
  1992, $25.

- E. Rich, Artificial Intelligence, McGraw Hill, 1983, $19 (****).

- R. L. Shrader, Electronic Communication, 2nd ed., McGraw Hill, 1967, $15
  (***).

- S. A. Rago, Unix System V Network Programming, Addison Wesley, 1993, $25
  (!).

- K. Sherman, Data Communications: A User's Guide, 3rd ed., Prentice Hall,
  1990, $25 (!).

- P. K. Andleigh and M. R. Gretzinger, Distributed Object-Oriented Data-
  Systems Design, Prentice Hall, 1992, $25 (!).

- G. Salton and M. J. McGill, Introduction to Modern Information Retrieval,
  McGraw Hill, 1983, $25 (!).

- W. J. Collins, Data Structures: An Object-Oriented Approach, Addison 
  Wesley, 1992, $25.

- J. D. Foley, and A. Van Dam, Fundamentals of Interactive Computer Graphics,
  Addison Wesley, 1982, $19 (!).

- E. W. Reed and I. S. Larman, Fluid Power with Microprocessor Control: An
  Introduction, Prentice Hall, 1985, $19 (****).

- T. C. Bartee, Editor-in-Chief, Digital Communications, Howard Sams & Co.,
  1986, $35 (!).

- C. G. Guy, Data Communications for Engineers, McGraw Hill, 1992, $29 (!).

- C. L. Wyatt, Electro-optical System Design for Information Processing,
  McGraw Hill, 1991, $35 (!).

- J. S. Vandergraft, Introduction to Numerical Computations, Academic Press,
  1978, $29 (!). 

- F. Halsall, Data Communications, Computer Networks and Open Systems, 3rd
  ed., Addison Wesley, 1992, $25 (****). 

- D. R. Smith, Digital Transmission Systems, Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1985,
  $20 (****).

- W. S. Meisel, Computer-Oriented Approaches to Pattern Recognition,
  Academic Press, 1972, $25 (***).


If interested, Please e-mail me at: tho@carbon.denver.colorado.edu
               or Phone me at     : (303) 364-4426

Thanks,

Tuan T. Ho



-----------[000481][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 1994 23:15:19 GMT
From:      Ed Kubaitis <ejk@uiuc.edu>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.infosystems.www.providers
Subject:   Re: RFC-1413 (ex. 931) server code?

ard@cs.waikato.ac.nz (Andrew Donkin) wrote:
>
> This feels like a FAQ, but I haven't seen mention of it anywhere, so I'll
> stick my head out and ask it anyway.
> 
> I want to run a server to deal with RFC931-style requests, initially so
> that our machines can tell HTTP servers who is requesting pages.  I'm sure
> we'll come up with more uses later.

I'm sure you will, but as far as I know, your server will take a
significant performance hit, and you will gather no, um, *useful*
information from Mac or Windows browsers or Unix systems that
don't run identd. I'll trade you a Perl RFC1413 query example
for a description of the 'more uses later' you contemplate.

--------------------------
Ed Kubaitis - ejk@uiuc.edu


-----------[000482][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 01:59:22 GMT
From:      bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov (Brett Bobley)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

Hi, folks.  I'm having trouble getting a dynamic SLIP route to propogate
via RIP. Can anyone give me some advice?  Let me explain my setup:

We own a class B address 152.119.X.X and use a 24 bit mask,
255.255.255.0.  In my building, the building backbone uses 152.119.1.X. 
Each office in my building has a 3Com Netbuilder bridge/router hanging off
of the backbone, connecting the backbone to their local nets.  My 3Com,
for example, has two ethernet ports.  Port 1 is connected to the backbone
and has IP 152.119.1.253.  Then Port 2 is connected to my network and has
IP 152.119.253.99.  My subnet uses the addresses 152.119.253.X.

Ok, that is the setup!

On my network, I have various Unix, Macs, Vaxes, etc.  I also have a
Telebit netblazer ST tcp/ip terminal server/router.  The ethernet port is
assigned IP 152.119.253.28.  When I dial up the netblazer and make a SLIP
connection from home, I have the netblazer IP pool automatically assign me
IP 152.119.253.60.  The netblazer then broadcasts this route (via RIP) to
my subnet (i.e. to 152.119.253.255).  The RIP update seems to work fine. 
For example, my Unix boxes immediately pick up the route and has the IP of
152.119.253.60 (my machine at home) reachable via the gateway of
152.119.253.28 (the netblazer).  Now I can reach any of the machines on my
subnet from my home machine.

The problem is, my 3com gateway machine does not pick up the route!  If I
look at the routing tables on the 3Com, it doesn't have a special route
for 152.119.253.60 as going through 152.119.253.28.

Why isn't this working?  I even tried adding the route statically directly
on the 3com, but the 3com still won't put it into the routing table.

My suspicion is that the 3Com doesn't "like" the fact that I am using a 24
bit mask for all my machines but using a full 32 bit mask for the SLIP
machine.

What suggestions do you have?  How do most folks handle SLIP/PPP routing
and such?  Any tips would be appreciated!

Brett

-- 
Brett Bobley
U.S. Coast Guard
Washington, DC
Internet: bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov

-- 
Brett Bobley
U.S. Coast Guard
Washington, DC
Internet: bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov

-----------[000483][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 03:56:13 GMT
From:      wren@io.nosc.mil (Wren Lee)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.dcom.sys.cisco
Subject:   Re: secondary routing reference

Szymon Sokol (szymon@uci.agh.edu.pl) wrote:
: Tony Rall (trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com) wrote:
: : In article <1994Nov14.164741@acad.drake.edu>,
: : George W. Miller <gm0551s@acad.drake.edu> wrote:
: : >
: : >Can anyone give me a good reference on secondary routing so we may have
: : >different ip network numbers on the same wire?
 
: : "Secondary routing"?  I've never heard that term applied to having 2
: : logical nets on the same physical net.  To me it would mean something
: : closer to backup routing, but that does not imply multiple nets per
: : net.
 
: This is a term used specifically by Cisco (actually, it is "secondary adress"
: not "secondary routing"): you assign TWO (or more) different IP addresses to
: the same interface. I do not know any other device than Cisco routers that 
: would allow this, so this question probably belongs to comp.dcom.sys.cisco
: (and I changed Newsgroups: appriopriately).
: --
>> I have a 3com router that does this also.  I forget the term they used
>> but it was less arcane than secondary addressing.
>> I believe wellfleet allows it also.
>> its probably a feature to be looked for in router wares.  
>> we have used it to great advantage.

--
aloha,
/wren

wren lee,  Systems Engineer, SAIC Comsystems
Office:(808) 471 5475 Fax:(808) 471 7062  Email: wren@nosc.mil

-----------[000484][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 05:22:55 GMT
From:      ian@saucer.cc.umr.edu (Ian Koenig)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   SunOS 5.3 Server sockets?



I am attempting to get sockets to work on SunOS 5.3.  Where can I get help
on how to do this?  Straight bind and connect do not work, sooo... 
I have looked at t_connect and t_bind but I am not sure of getting this
figured out correctly or not.

If at all possible I would like to get some sample code or where I need to
go to find this.

thanks
ian

ian@umr.edu

--

Here is my signature file, yes it needs some help, and the doctor says I
will be out of rehab in a couple of weeks.
------------
"You know you gotta be tough when you go up against a barrage of laser
weapons with a puny little sword.  "  
		-Chris DeBons paraphrasing Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi
------------
Now are you going to come quietly or do I have to wear ear plugs? 

-----------[000485][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 13:44:27 -0500
From:      taddy@cc.gatech.edu (Rajesh R. Talpade)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP control block query


Hi Folks !


I have a  simple application program (source) using a TCP socket to 
transfer data to a peer application on another machine (destination).

My query is:

If I startup the source, and allow the TCP connection to be 
initiated at this end (I can see SYN's being sent out), and then
do a control-C (i.e. kill the source), how does TCP get this signal
(thru which routine), and how does it clear up the related control 
block ?? 

I put printf's in the code where TCP gets a PRU_ABORT, but it 
doesn't seem to get there.

I am running this on a Sparc LX with SunOs 4.1.3


Any pointers will be appreciated.



Thanks a lot.


Rajesh.
taddy@cc.gatech.edu
-- 

 _______________________________
||  	  Live Life !!!        ||		(404)-712-9050	
||  	It's no rehearsal.     ||		taddy@cc.gatech.edu		
 -------------------------------

-----------[000486][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 06:01:00 GMT
From:      bnaren@ece.ucdavis.edu (Naren B.)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Wanted programs


I was looking for examples of programs that use sockets and implement
utilities like talk, ftp etc. I am a beginner and am looking for simple
programs. I am looking for code that runs on UNIX platforms.

Please e-mail any responses since I do not read this newsgroup very often.


-----------[000487][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 06:34:24 GMT
From:      john@entc.tamu.edu (John T. Willis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HTTP server for Winsock?

In article <dino.31.0502EEE7@cam.org>, dino@cam.org (Dino Moriello) says:
>
>Does anyone know if a http server program exist to run under a PC winsock 
>platform?

Multiple versions, simplest is the winsock visual basic web server
that comes with IPPORT.

-----------[000488][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 08:17:25 GMT
From:      trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: More detailed 4 you

My guess is that the arp requests from your Winsock system
either aren't reaching the HP machine or contain something
unpalatable to the HP.  (Or perhaps the responses aren't
making it back to Winsock.)

Try tracing on the thinnet segment.  Compare the Winsock arp
packets with those from other machines.

-- 
Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com

-----------[000489][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 09:07:10 GMT
From:      trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Subnetting question

In article <3alq14$18mm@news-s01.ny.us.ibm.net>,  <bward01@ibm.net> wrote:
>
>If I use a subnet mask of 255.255.255.224 this will give 3 bits for the subnet number.
>
>However,  I read somewhere that I can't use subnet numbers of all zero's or all ones
>and this would limit me to 6 subnets instead of 8.
>
>Is this true? 

Yes.

-- 
Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com

-----------[000490][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 09:11:26 GMT
From:      etxmesa@eos.ericsson.se (Michael Salmon)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.infosystems.www.providers
Subject:   Re: RFC-1413 (ex. 931) server code?

In article <3aohu2$tdf@ogre.cs.waikato.ac.nz>
ard@cs.waikato.ac.nz (Andrew Donkin) writes:
|> This feels like a FAQ, but I haven't seen mention of it anywhere, so I'll
|> stick my head out and ask it anyway.
|> 
|> I want to run a server to deal with RFC931-style requests, initially so
|> that our machines can tell HTTP servers who is requesting pages.  I'm sure
|> we'll come up with more uses later.
|> 
|> I also understand RFC-931 has been superceded by 1413.
|> 
|> Are there sample implementations?  Even better, is there a Solaris 2
|> implementation, or SVR4 source that I can start from?

You can take a look at ftp://lysator.liu.se/pub/ident

-- 

Michael Salmon

#include	<standard.disclaimer>
#include	<witty.saying>
#include	<fancy.pseudo.graphics>

Ericsson Telecom AB
Stockholm

-----------[000491][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 09:22:03 GMT
From:      trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

You aren't (or shouldn't be) using a 32 bit subnet mask for your slip
systems, you're using host routes - which is something different.
(Which is good, because you're also using RIP, and that doesn't work
properly with variable subnet masks.)  Can RIP be used to broadcast
host routes?  I don't know.

But if you manually added a host route to your 3com router, I'd be
surprised if it didn't work (although I have no experience with 3com).

I prefer using proxy arp to handle the "routing" for point-to-point
links.  Why clutter the routing table of every machine on the LAN with
numerous host routes?  I don't know whether the Netblazer will do
proxy arp for its remote connections.

-- 
Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com

-----------[000492][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 94 18:34:21 +0930
From:      nichols@scm.dsto.gov.au
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Advise Wanted: Corporate Subnetting Std

In article <x663kKZ.bsimon@delphi.com>, Bob Simon <bsimon@delphi.com> writes:
> My corporation has a class B address.  I am on a committee which is defining
> rules by which subnet and host addresses will be assigned.  I recommended
> that RFC 1219 be followed strictly, but was outvoted by those who prefer the
> simplicity of assigning subnets in counting order (1-254) with a mask of
> 255.255.255.0.

My corporation has 5 class B nets and we would use neither of those two
solutions. We have recently begun a process of distibuting the addresses
accross the network topology in such a way as to be quite efficient with 
address utilisation and leave plenty of unused ranges throughout the net
to accomodate growth and reorganisation.

We use VLSM and OSPF but we divide up the address space and distribute in a
structured way which is consistent with route summarisation given our topology.

If I remeber RFC 1219 correctly then I think that you would probably use up
the address space, starting from the begining, and working through to the end
while minimising unused ranges. This doesn't allow for flexibility. Do the 
distribution manually and you will be able to fine tune a much better solution.
You will get used to VLSM quite quickly.

Subnetting on 255.255.255.0 is quite a good starting point but I think that it
would be a mistake to be locked in to that. Try using VLSM/OSPF and 
255.255.255.0 initially. Later subnet sizes can be adjusted to match actual 
requirements. Subnets may be made smaller or larger by just changing the mask.
If you make some smaller then you can reuse the left-over-part as a new subnet.

If you want flexible subnetting then you must assign end node addresses 
systematically from the start of the range; allowing the ren of the range to 
be removed later.

> This is not so terrible, but I am concerned about another proposal to assign
> host addresses in predefined ranges.  For example, PCs may be assigned
> addresses in the range 1-200; servers may be given addresses from 200-220;
> and routers may get the range 245-254.  This would completely eliminate the
> possibility of adding additional subnets (beyond 254 subnets) should the need
> arise in the future.
                                                           
This may seem nice from a aesthetic perspective but it fails
to satisfy any real need. There are other important considerations which 
should take presidence over this aesthetic solution. Yes, this may be slighly
easier to manage allocations but the advantage is relatively trivial.

I would suggest routers at the start of the subnet range so that their 
addreses can remain unchanged while the subnet length can be varied.
The hosts come next, numbered from the bottom of the range, so the overall
subnet range which is in use can be as small as practicable.

Additional structure can be really useful if packet filtering 
or prioity queuing (etc) based on addresses is a possibility, then 
you should organise the address space based on priorities or security 
levels. This can yield great efficiencies in minimising both the config to 
define those nodes' addresses later, and in the processor loading required 
to give those packets special treatment; whatever it may be.

Incidentally, you can not just define arbitary ranges because bit masking 
is most efficient at defining whole (binary integer) fractional ranges 
within subnets. 

> I would appreciate comments discussing any advantages or disadvantages of
> this proposal.  Are any of you aware of organizations which had to renumber
> IP hosts due to an inflexible or inefficient addressing scheme?

Yeah, we have to do that to but we know the way to do it now!

Have you seen RFC 1597 (re conservation of addresses)

Regards, Peter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Nichols
Information Technology Services    E-mail:peter.nichols@dsto.defence.gov.au
Corporate Information Systems Unit
Defence Science & Technology Organisation             Phone: +61 8 259 5379
PO Box 1500, Salisbury, 5108, Australia                 Fax: +61 8 259 5537
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



-----------[000493][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 94 18:48:57 +0930
From:      nichols@scm.dsto.gov.au
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: IP addressing strategies

In article <Cyxz3o.IA2@cix.compulink.co.uk>, galileoswieng@cix.compulink.co.uk ("Galileo Internationa") writes:
>> How should we arrange our addresses?  Should we apply for a segment of 
>> Internet address space now even if we'll probably never use it?  Should 
>> we ignore the Internet and design a priveta addressing scheme and worry 
>> about the Internet in the future?

You have to be able to demonstrate a need for real IP addresses these days.
A good guide on alternative addressing is RFC 1597. It describes ways of using
"private reserved" addresses or normal addresses or a combination of these to 
match your actual requirements. The application form for addresses is also
worth a read before you makeup your mind.

see my other posting, from today, in this group, regarding allocating the 
addresses within you org. 

We use a mixture; all of the reserved addresses and 4 normal class Bs.
This is the only way you'll ever get a Class A size address space!

Regards, 
        Peter

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Nichols
Information Technology Services    E-mail:peter.nichols@dsto.defence.gov.au
Corporate Information Systems Unit
Defence Science & Technology Organisation             Phone: +61 8 259 5379
PO Box 1500, Salisbury, 5108, Australia                 Fax: +61 8 259 5537
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


-----------[000494][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 94 19:17:32 +0930
From:      nichols@scm.dsto.gov.au
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: The smallest subnet possible

In article <3ag5kn$flf@bcarh8ab.bnr.ca>, Evan Champion <evanc@bnr.ca> writes:
>> What I'd recommand is setting up a small subnet (255.255.255.248, for
>> example) for your dial-in server and hosts, and then advertise the dial-
>> in users as routes outside of that subnet (rather than proxy-ARPing
>> them).
>>
>> For example, if you have a gateway at 192.9.200.1, a host at .2 and some
>> dial-in servers at .3, .4, .5 and .6, then I'd assign 192.9.200.254 down
>> through 192.9.200.9 as the dial-in users.  This would allow you to have
>> 246 users active at one time.
>> 
>> To make this work you will need gateways, hosts and servers which
>> understand host routes and honor them [not all do!].

Yes, an interesting solution; but as you suggest at the end it all really 
comes done to what a particular dial-in server supports.

Cisco's cs500 has a good way of doing this for SLIP and PPP. This may only 
be in new s/w, ie. >9.21... (it changed a bit then)

The idea is that the server's interface is dynamic ("unnumbered") so the 
dialin node can use almost any address that isn't in the LAN/WAN. 
If the address is from the attached LAN range then the dialin node 
works as if on the LAN. Alternately if the address is not in the 
LAN subnet then the dialin server will do the necessary routing. 
That is to advertising a host route if the address is from a subnet 
which is already in use in the WAN or a new subnet route if appropriate.

The addressing scheme described above would be supported using any of
"host routes", proxy ARP and/or "unnumbered interface".

> The current configuration is as follows:
> 
> terminal server --> PPP customer
> 192.197.166.6       199.84.54.1
> 255.255.255.0       255.255.255.248
 
> The PPP clients have their own networks separate from the local
> Ethernet.
> 
> Now, what I have been told is that an IP host can only talk to
> another IP host if it is on the same subnet unless there is a
> router, and then the router must be on the same net as the IP
> host.
> 
> So, assuming I subnet at 255.255.255.252, the IP configuration
> would be
> 
> *.0 network address
> *.1 address of the local PPP interface
> *.2 address of the remote PPP interfae
> *.3 broadcast address
> 
> *.4 network address
> *.5 address of the local PPP interface
> *.6 address of the remote PPP interface
> *.7 broadcast address
> 
> etc. etc.

This is the correct basic conceptual model for a static Leased-Line type of
network using Variable Length Subnet Masking, VLSM; but it will not allow 
the flexibility which is normally required in a dialin modem pool for 
SLIP/PPP access.

Since this can be a product specific solution have you tried the vendor or
the manual :-) ?

Regards,
      Peter

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Nichols
Information Technology Services    E-mail:peter.nichols@dsto.defence.gov.au
Corporate Information Systems Unit
Defence Science & Technology Organisation             Phone: +61 8 259 5379
PO Box 1500, Salisbury, 5108, Australia                 Fax: +61 8 259 5537
---------------------------------------------------------------------------




-----------[000495][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      20 Nov 94 19:26:53 +0930
From:      nichols@scm.dsto.gov.au
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Wanted: IP packet level ENCRYPTION

Hi all,

Do you know of a device to do Packet Level Encryption in a LAN environment?

By this I mean encryption of the data portion of the Network Protocol
datagrams, ie. scrambling the TCP/IP or Novell/IPX or AppleTalk/DDP
datagrams' payload. The packet headers would be left clear to allow routing
across an ordinary multiprotocol WAN.

I expect that this function would be best performed by a discrete physical
module which could join high security LANs to an ordinary WAN at a LAN
interface. Other techniques may be of interest.

I am looking for something like a (multiprotocol) router which takes packets
from one secure LAN and scrambles the data payload of the packet before
routing it out on to another ordinary LAN (or WAN). The reverse process
would be applied by another such box at the other side of the network.

I am not interested in Frame level (Ethernet, X25 or Frame Relay) or link
level encryption. Nor am I interested in security systems which do not
encrypt the data.

I would be interested to hear of any such products regardless of the
particular protocols that they can handle, their speed or security level
at which they operate. Please reply by Email (as well as News if you wish).

Regards,

Peter Nichols
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Nichols
Information Technology Services    E-mail:peter.nichols@dsto.defence.gov.au
Corporate Information Systems Unit
Defence Science & Technology Organisation             Phone: +61 8 259 5379
PO Box 1500, Salisbury, 5108, Australia                 Fax: +61 8 259 5537
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000496][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 22:22:25 -0600
From:      scouten@uiuc.edu (Eric Scouten)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP for Macintosh

In article <3aqog7$74e@ankh.iia.org>, roxi@roxi. wrote:

> I am looking for a good TCP/IP stack for the Macintosh.  Appreciate any info 
> that could be sent my way.  Thanks,

The standard on Macintosh is to use Apple's MacTCP driver, which is
included with System 7.5 and is available as a separate package for users
of older systems.

MacTCP will be replaced sometime next year by Open Transport, which is
Apple's attempt to merge the networking products into a single API and
meet emerging standards at the same time. (Of course, MacTCP will continue
to be in widespread use for some time thereafter.)

For more information on programming MacTCP, I suggest you consult my
MacTCP Programmer's Reference Guide at:

  http://tampico.cso.uiuc.edu/~scouten/mactcp


BTW, your newsreader is distributing an incorrect address on the "From:"
header. Please fix it.

-es

__________________________________________________________________________
Eric Scouten                                      e-mail: scouten@uiuc.edu    
MS Comp Sci '96, U of Illinois        http://tampico.cso.uiuc.edu/~scouten
But if your Snark be a Boojum... You will softly and suddenly vanish away,
And never be met with again!
   -Lewis Carroll, Hunting of the Snark

-----------[000497][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 94 12:25:17 GMT
From:      mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de (Mario Klebsch DG1AM)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Address already in use message

adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow) writes:

>In article <denny.785194315@hostfax>,
>                Tom Denny <denny@hostfax.aifp.com> wrote:
 
>>We have a concurrent server application in TCP/IP which binds to an address
>>on a  well known port number.  When the application is killed, and then
>>restarted, bind fails with the message "Address already in use".  We then
>>either have to restart the machine or wait for 10-15 minutes before
>>restarting the application.  Does anyone have any idea what might be
>>causing this? 
>>
 
>Your application is probably forgetting to close the listen() socket as
>well as accept()ed sockets, or is just doing a shutdown on it.

Does't the kernel close all open descriptors, when the process exites?
This is what I learned about UNIX. Do sockets behave different ?

Mario
--
Mario Klebsch, DG1AM, mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de		+49 531 / 391 - 7457
Institut fuer Robotik und Prozessinformatik der TU Braunschweig
Hamburger Strasse 267, 38114 Braunschweig, Germany

-----------[000498][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 12:40:52 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <3aporr$mia@juniper.almaden.ibm.com>, trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall) writes:
|> You aren't (or shouldn't be) using a 32 bit subnet mask for your slip
|> systems, you're using host routes - which is something different.
|> (Which is good, because you're also using RIP, and that doesn't work
|> properly with variable subnet masks.)  Can RIP be used to broadcast
|> host routes?  I don't know.

Actually, RIP-2 handles both host routes and variable-length subnet
masks.

|> But if you manually added a host route to your 3com router, I'd be
|> surprised if it didn't work (although I have no experience with 3com).

I don't think I would be surprised.  Many hosts and routers seem (from
my experiments here) to ignore host routes since they're not required to
accept them.

|> I prefer using proxy arp to handle the "routing" for point-to-point
|> links.  Why clutter the routing table of every machine on the LAN with
|> numerous host routes?  I don't know whether the Netblazer will do
|> proxy arp for its remote connections.

Why the clutter?  Because it works better if you have multiple servers
and users have assigned IP addresses.  I agree that for simple
installations, proxy-ARP alleviates a lot of headaches.  But many
routers out there will *not* age ARP entries, which makes proxy-ARP
unworkable for configurations with multiple dial-in servers and dynamic
addressing.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000499][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 22:57:46 -0600
From:      msv9203@tamsun.tamu.edu (Marshall Scott Veach)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Socket Programming

I am trying to write a client/server system that has multiple servers
which distribute a particular client's requests... i.e. a client asks
a particular server for info and the server gathers info from the other
server and returns info to client.

I am recieving the following error whenever I have more than two servers
in the net...

ld.so: call to undefined procedure _fopen from 0x40a0

...if I have two or one server the fopen call works fine.  Also, I *think*
that this error will occur on any system call not just file system calls.

I am not intimate with the ways libraries are dynamically allocated, etc.
can anyone help point me to a source of info that might clear this problem
up?

marshall veach


-----------[000500][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 13:40:54 GMT
From:      camerong@syntegra.bt.co.uk (Gary Cameron)
To:        comp.sys.novell,comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Packet through-put on CISCO 7000

CISCO 7000 Through-put.

I am considering the purchase of a couple of CISCO 7000 routers 
for a network. Does anyone have any test data on the through-put 
of this product. I am particularly interested in figures for:

Novell    	bridging and routing
TCP/IP 	bridging and routing
DECnet     	bridging and routing
LAT	bridging
Rest 	bridging

We are looking at connecting the CISCO 7000 into an FDDI ring 
and using Ethernet for the rest of the outlets.

I understand the maximum through-put is 220 000 packets per 
second. Is there any limitation to  this figure when using the above 
protocols?

Has anyone got good or bad experiences of the CISCO 7000 that 
they would like to pass on ???

Thanks 
Gary Cameron

Mo beachd agamsa...

----------------------------------------------------------------------
All opinions expressed here my own and not the companies. Maybe...
Gary Cameron

E-mail camerong@leeds.syntegra.bt.co.uk    (ignore imitation copies)
Fon    ++ 44 532 XXXXXX 
----------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000501][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 14:03:00 GMT
From:      edm@harpo.dev.uga.edu (Ed Maioriello)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: BOOTP question

In article <CzDJsI.n04@ngc.com>, Annie Leung <annie@ngc.com> wrote:
>If a bootp client does not know its IP address, can it still specify
>a specific BOOTP Server IP address ?  If yes, does that mean this
>packet will have to be broadcasted on the DLC layer but with Destination
>IP address in the IP layer being that of the BOOTP server ?  Isn't this
>considered a special case then since we usually only broadcast on the DLC
>layer if the IP destination address is a broadcast address ?
>
>
Annie,

I could be wrong, but I think bootp requests have to be both dlc and IP
broadcasts.  I do believe that there is a bit to flip though that tells
the server whether the reply can be a dlc unicast or must be a
broadcast.  (default is "can be unicast" or "0", I think).

Hope this helps,

Ed Maioriello                                         edm@eris.ucns.uga.edu
University Computing & Networking Services            edm@harpo.dev.uga.edu
University of Georgia  ----------------------------------------------------
Athens, Ga. 30602      | First Rule of Troubleshooting: 
(706)-542-6468         |                     If it don't work - plug it in! 


-----------[000502][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 14:09:02 GMT
From:      edm@harpo.dev.uga.edu (Ed Maioriello)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: 802.2 help

In article <50.1223.901@freddy.supernet.ab.ca>,
Mike Laplaunte <mike.laplaunte@freddy.supernet.ab.ca> wrote:
>
>Problem:
>
>We have just started using 16 bit cards that are from a third party
>manufacturer.  We are using the ODI drivers along with IBM's DXM drivers
>(specifically DXMA and DXMC).  Now, upon bootup, if I don't run the ODI's
>I get 802.2 communcation just fine, but, the moment I load the "TOKEN"
>driver, I hear a click from the MAU (expected), but I lose my 802.2 connection.
>
Mike,

This was probably better suited to comp.sys.novell, but here goes
anyway.  Both the DXMC driver and the TOKEN.COM mlid are trying to
control your TR card, and that is your problem.  Try using the
LANSUP.COM mlid.  Instead of talking to the TR hardware, it will talk to
the ASI interface of your dixie-mod drivers.  Don't forget that if you
need your IPX to cross source routed bridges you will need to load
ROUTE.COM for the TOKEN-RING board.

Hope this helps,

Ed Maioriello                                         edm@eris.ucns.uga.edu
University Computing & Networking Services            edm@harpo.dev.uga.edu
University of Georgia  ----------------------------------------------------
Athens, Ga. 30602      | First Rule of Troubleshooting: 
(706)-542-6468         |                     If it don't work - plug it in! 


-----------[000503][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 94 13:38:54 MET
From:      hadersbeck@horus.mch.sni.de (Martin Hadersbeck)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   WFW-TCP/IP routing problem to NT

Hello

We have a big problem concerning TCP/IP from Microsoft.
Our network consists of a WIN/NT Advanced Server 3.1 and
WfW-3.11 Clients running TCP/IP-32. Now the clients connected
are not all on the same subnet. The problem is that the 
clients may successfully ping and telnet the server but
if they want to access shared resources from the server
there is no way to do that. The only clients which can use
the servers resources are the ones in the same subnet as 
server itself. This has to be done by manually entering 
the correct information in the network browser window, but
it works.
But as far as I know is TCP/IP a protocol with routing 
abilities. So how can it be made possible for all clients
to profit from the servers resources.

Oh I forgot to say that the TCP/IP-protocol is the only
one which is installed.

I hope somebody could give a helpful hint here.


Thanks in advance


Martin


-----------[000504][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 14:57:25 GMT
From:      mattis@argos.uu.panix.com (Mattis Fishman)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Address already in use message

Tom Denny (denny@hostfax.aifp.com) wrote:
: We have a concurrent server application in TCP/IP which binds to an address
: on a  well known port number.  When the application is killed, and then
: restarted, bind fails with the message "Address already in use".  We then
: either have to restart the machine or wait for 10-15 minutes before
: restarting the application.  Does anyone have any idea what might be
: causing this? 
 
: Thanks for your help!

It seems to me that it is possible that the server went down while a client
still had a stream socket connection. This will prevent the server from 
binding to the well known port until the client closes its end.
Even after closing the socket on the client side, there may be a delay, 
until the address is available. On AIX, netstat reports a state of TIME_WAIT
during this time. I believe that this may be due to unsent data and therefore
manipulated using setsockopt(... SO_LINGER ...) 

Mattis

-----------[000505][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 16:53:23
From:      PPMORRIS@mailbox.syr.edu (Peter P. Morrissey)
To:        comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic

In article <1994Nov18.160002.15195@janix.mfr.dec.com> maass@orchis.enet.dec.com (Joerg Maass) writes:
>Newsgroups: comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
>Path: newstand.syr.edu!travelers.mail.cornell.edu!news.kei.com!hookup!olivea!koriel!wnoc-sfc-news!news.dec-j!jrd.dec.com!mets86.mse.tay.dec.com!jac.zko.dec.com!crl.dec.com!pa.dec.com!mrnews.mro.dec.com!janix.mfr.dec.com!news
>From: maass@orchis.enet.dec.com (Joerg Maass)
>Subject: Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic
>Message-ID: <1994Nov18.160002.15195@janix.mfr.dec.com>
>Keywords: RMON, Sniffer, traffic
>Lines: 59
>Sender: news@janix.mfr.dec.com (SDSC USENET News System)
>Reply-To: Joerg.Maass@frs.mts.dec.com
>Organization: Digital Equipment, Frankfurt, Germany
>X-Newsreader: mxrn 6.18-8
>References:  <3aai5a$1ab@news2.delphi.com>
>Date: Fri, 18 Nov 1994 16:00:02 GMT
>Xref: newstand.syr.edu comp.dcom.net-management:49 comp.dcom.lans.ethernet:12936 comp.protocols.tcp-ip:29794



>Newsgroups: comp.dcom.net-management,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
>Distribution: world
>X-Newsreader: mxrn 6.18-8
>Followup-To: 
>References:  <3aai5a$1ab@news2.delphi.com>
>From: maass@orchis.enet.dec.com (Joerg Maass)
>Reply-To: Joerg.Maass@frs.mts.dec.com
>Organization: Digital Equipment, Frankfurt, Germany
>Subject: Re: ? Distributed analysis of IP traffic
>Keywords: RMON, Sniffer, traffic
 
>In article <3aai5a$1ab@news2.delphi.com>, dougm@delphi.com (Doug McPherson) writes:
>>
>>I've been able to use RMON tools to meaure the traffic on my network segments, 
>>and I can tell that TCP/IP is using n% of my traffic.  What I *can't*
>>tell from these tools is *which* TCP/IP applications are consuming that n %?!
>>I.e. I'd like to be able to break the TCP/IP traffic down into
>>source/destination groupings, based on the TCP/IP application (e.g.
>>telnet, ftp, HTTP,Doom, etc).
>>
>>Are there tools out there than can "massage" this data out of my RMON probes or
>>do I need to use yet another application to gather this data?
>>
>>I'm currently looking at NNstat to gather the data.  It's free, it runs on my 
>>Alpha systems, but it's pretty "low to the ground".   If there are
>>similar applications out there that will let me analyze multiple
>>segments of TCP/IP traffic, and are easier to install/configure than
>>NNstat, I'd very much like to
>>know.
>>
>>"Off the rack" applications would be preferred.
>>
 
>Hi Doug,
 
>try our POLYCENTER Probewatch on OSF/1 product together with DECpacketprobes 90
>(Ethernet) and 900RR (Token Ring). The Probes are out now, the software will be
>available in February.
 
>If you look at RMON statistics, you should ensure that the probes and software
>in question support all eight RMON groups, which is not necessarily common.
>RMON has the capability to provide traffic matrices and protocol decoding, if
>you have the appropriate tools. Both our software and hardware support the full
>range of RMON groups, so they should be able to solve your problem.

Actually there are 9 RMON groups. And, RMON does not have the ability to break
down traffic in they manner described above. It can really only see up to 
layer 2. The exception to this is when packets are actually captured.

Most applications that give you the data in question are proprietary i.e. HP 
Netmetrix. There are also some RMON probes that may provide extensions or
proprietary MIBS that contain this data, but then it isn't RMON any more.

_Pete M.


>Yours sincerely



>Joerg Maass
>-- 


>Digital Equipment GmbH                Tel.: +49/6103/383-107
>Robert-Bosch-Str. 5                   Fax : +49/6103/383-157
>D-63303 Dreieich-Sprendlingen         Joerg.Maass@frs.mts.dec.com



-----------[000506][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 15:16:41 GMT
From:      tma@encore.com (Thanh Ma)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: nfswatch binary for U.W.??

cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith) writes:


>Does anyone have either nfswatch compiled for U.W. or another tool
>that can snoop on what's going on with the NFS client and / or server
>activity??

I believe that Mike ported tcpdump (check ftp.novell.de).

Thanh Ma
tma@encore.com

-----------[000507][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 15:32:46 GMT
From:      neil_r@gradient.com (Neil Rowland)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,alt.winsock
Subject:   Help: where does ECONNREFUSED come from?

I'm trying to connect to a server using TCP, and I consistently get
ECONNREFUSED back, which I gather means "connection forcibly rejected".
Now this begs the urgent questions:

1) Why is the connection request being rejected?
   (What are the possible reasons?  The docs I've got don't list any.)
2) What can I do about it?
   (For each possible reason, in turn.)

Looked at from another angle: what is the mechanism by which a server
rejects a connection request?  I know there's an accept() API, but I 
find nothing like a reject() call to refuse a connection.  I have the 
source to the server, and might be able to figure out what its gripe 
is if I knew where to look.

Can anyone out there give me a clue?  Or a string to grep for?  Copious
thanks in advance.

-----------[000508][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 94 15:55:08 GMT
From:      jpcalvez@ifremer.fr (Jean Pierre Calvez)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

Why can't I send broadcast UDP datagrams of the same length that point to
point datagrams? 
I understand that the IP layer is responsible for fragmenting UDP datagrams
when their length exceed the MTU of the LAN. This works well for point to point
datagrams, but not for broadcasting.
I use SunOS4.1.3 and ethernet. The MTU is 1500, and the maximum size of the messages
that I can broadcast is 1472.
Why fragmenting is not performed by IP? Has anyone an idea?
It doesn't seem logical to me.


Jean-Pierre CALVEZ


-----------[000509][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 16:05:48 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <3aporr$mia@juniper.almaden.ibm.com> trall@almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall) writes:
>You aren't (or shouldn't be) using a 32 bit subnet mask for your slip
>systems, you're using host routes - which is something different.
>(Which is good, because you're also using RIP, and that doesn't work
>properly with variable subnet masks.)  Can RIP be used to broadcast
>host routes?  I don't know.
> ...

Yes, although the 4.3BSD routed has a few, easily fixed bugs with host
routes.


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000510][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 16:15:46 GMT
From:      seth@amanda.dorsai.org (Seth Bromberger)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   RFC1597 vs RFC1627

Has anyone implemented the procedures detailed in RFC1597, particularly 
in light of RFC1627?  We're looking into this as a backup measure in the 
event we can't get a class-B address space, but don't want to be stuck 
renumbering 8,000 hosts.

Please reply via e-mail.  Thanks!

Seth Bromberger

-----------[000511][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 16:17:01 GMT
From:      vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <3aq4gk$fvq@newhub.xylogics.com> carlson@xylogics.com writes:
>In article <3aporr$mia@juniper.almaden.ibm.com>, trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall) writes:
 
> ...
>|> But if you manually added a host route to your 3com router, I'd be
>|> surprised if it didn't work (although I have no experience with 3com).
>
>I don't think I would be surprised.  Many hosts and routers seem (from
>my experiments here) to ignore host routes since they're not required to
>accept them.
> ...

I thought Tony Rall was talking about static routes, not RIP routes.
Mixing static routes with any kind of routing protocol is a classic
recipe for problems.  People who do that almost always start complaining
that their static routes mysteriously disappear.

From what I've seen, hosts generally handle host routes just fine,
especially those based on BSD code.  Some router boxes have caused
problems.  I've seen some simply ignore host routes.  Others decide to
trim the host bits and infer network routes.  Before recent releases in
which they've finally gotten host routes working well enough, I suffered
from a popular brand that would trim the host bits, infer a network
route, use their worse than simplistic mapping between RIP and IGRP
metrics twice, and so advertise trans-Atlantic black holes.  (Again,
that vendor seems to have fixed that problem.)  Those and other hassles
with routers convinced me to modify `routed` to combine host and network
routes when their next hops and metrics are compatible, reducing the
opportunities for router box creativity.


Vernon Schryver    vjs@rhyolite.com

-----------[000512][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 16:39:59 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,alt.winsock
Subject:   Re: Help: where does ECONNREFUSED come from?

In article <3aqeiu$d08@gradient.gradient.com>, neil_r@gradient.com (Neil Rowland) writes:
|> I'm trying to connect to a server using TCP, and I consistently get
|> ECONNREFUSED back, which I gather means "connection forcibly rejected".
|> Now this begs the urgent questions:
|> 
|> 1) Why is the connection request being rejected?
|>    (What are the possible reasons?  The docs I've got don't list any.)

This means that there's no listening port on the remote machine for the
requested connection you made.  If you list the listening connections
with "netstat -a | fgrep LISTEN" (or an equivalent on your system) and
you see that there *does* appear to be a listening port there, then one
of two things could be happening:

	1.  The server has a hacked TCP which is able to send RST in
	    response to SYN on a valid port under application control.

	2.  The port number you're sending isn't quite right.

If you're using sockets on your end, make sure you've got the port
number in the sockaddr_in structure in NETWORK order, not host order:

	struct sockaddr_in sin;

	sin.sin_family = AF_INET;
	sin.sin_port = htons(23);
	sin.sin_addr.s_addr = ...

This is a common error on backwards machines, like PCs.

|> Looked at from another angle: what is the mechanism by which a server
|> rejects a connection request?  I know there's an accept() API, but I 
|> find nothing like a reject() call to refuse a connection.  I have the 
|> source to the server, and might be able to figure out what its gripe 
|> is if I knew where to look.

Some APIs (god, how I loathe that abbreviation) have implicit reject
semantics when an accepted but as-yet unused connection is closed.
This probably isn't the case for this application, though.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000513][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 16:41:47 GMT
From:      dts@proteon.com (Daniel Senie)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.dcom.sys.cisco
Subject:   Re: secondary routing reference

In article <3aklc4$mov@galaxy.uci.agh.edu.pl> szymon@uci.agh.edu.pl (Szymon Sokol) writes:
>Tony Rall (trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com) wrote:
>: In article <1994Nov14.164741@acad.drake.edu>,
>: George W. Miller <gm0551s@acad.drake.edu> wrote:
>: >
>: >Can anyone give me a good reference on secondary routing so we may have
>: >different ip network numbers on the same wire?
 
>: "Secondary routing"?  I've never heard that term applied to having 2
>: logical nets on the same physical net.  To me it would mean something
>: closer to backup routing, but that does not imply multiple nets per
>: net.
>
>This is a term used specifically by Cisco (actually, it is "secondary adress"
>not "secondary routing"): you assign TWO (or more) different IP addresses to
>the same interface. I do not know any other device than Cisco routers that 
>would allow this, so this question probably belongs to comp.dcom.sys.cisco
>(and I changed Newsgroups: appriopriately).

Proteon routers allow multiple IP addresses per interface. There is no
performance difference between having one and many (other than the
obvious if you add additional traffic). Performance through any assigned
IP address is the same as through any other.

I would expect that most of the router vendors similarly support multiple
IP addresses on an interface, so your statement above that you did not
know of "any other device than Cisco routers that would allow this"
does not reflect actual practice. I've enncountered a lot of devices
that can and do support this.


-- 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Daniel Senie                 Internet:     dts@proteon.com
Proteon, Inc.
508-898-2800                 Packet Radio: N1JEB@KA1SRD.MA

-----------[000514][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 16:47:52 GMT
From:      jliou@tsegw.tse.com (Jack Liou)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP connect() on non-blocking socket

Is their any books talk about the use/behavior of using TCP connect()
on a non-blocking socket?
I know the connect itself should return EAGAIN to tell its a non-blocking
socket, but will the threeway-handshake continue?
Thanks for the pointers.

Jack
-- 

              / \ / \ / \
               | .   . |
-------^^^---------^---------^^^------

-----------[000515][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 16:54:06 GMT
From:      colin@mayfield.hp.com ()
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Help: where does ECONNREFUSED come from?

Neil Rowland (neil_r@gradient.com) wrote:
: I'm trying to connect to a server using TCP, and I consistently get
: ECONNREFUSED back, which I gather means "connection forcibly rejected".
: Now this begs the urgent questions:
 
: 1) Why is the connection request being rejected?
:    (What are the possible reasons?  The docs I've got don't list any.)

Here's some ideas:

  - If there is no "server" listening on that port number that you're trying
    to connect to. (Some UNIX machines have a netstat -an which shows
    the ports and their states.

    Can you check that the port # is in the LISTEN state on the server.

  - If the port # is controlled through inetd (ie telnet ftp), then
    you can configure the inetd.sec file to dis-allow access to that port.

    Check the inetd.sec file.

  - There could be a router in the way that denies you.
    Don't know of anyway of figuring that out unless you have the
    router's config.

Hope that helps
Colin
-//-
colin@mayfield.hp.com


-----------[000516][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 17:12:14 GMT
From:      colin@mayfield.hp.com ()
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   RFC1122 & UDP Broadcasts

RFC1122 section 3.2.1.3 states:

     For most purposes, a datagram addressed to a broadcast or
     multicast destination is processed as if it had been
     addressed to one of the host's IP addresses; we use the term
     "specific-destination address" for the equivalent local IP

My UDP Broadcast programs have been binding to either the interfaces broadcast 
address or "INADDR_ANY", but this indicates that you could also bind to
the local IP address and still receive broadcast packets - is this correct?

BTW - It doesn't seem to work on my machine (HP-UX s700 9.X)

Cheers
Colin Wynd
-//-
colin@mayfield.hp.com

-----------[000517][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 17:54:51 GMT
From:      rstone@superior.carleton.ca (Ron Stone)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Auto-discovery code

Hi, 

I am looking for some sample code to get an idea of how to
auto-discover ip addresses across subnets.

Thanks in advance.

==========================================================

Ron Stone                           rstone@ccs.carleton.ca

-----------[000518][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 18:21:59 GMT
From:      roxi@roxi. (Rene Oxild)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP for Macintosh

I am looking for a good TCP/IP stack for the Macintosh.  Appreciate any info 
that could be sent my way.  Thanks,

roxi@ios.com


-----------[000519][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 19:17:23 GMT
From:      tan@ctt.bellcore.com (Yiwen Tan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   RFC for PPP and SLIP

Hi, Netters,

	I am looking for documentation (preferably rfc) about PPP and SLIP. Can someone tell me what I can ftp it (or the rfc numbers) ?  Thanks.

Yiwen

-----------[000520][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 94 19:21:35 GMT
From:      oxr1@encon.pge.com (Omid Razavi)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   PPP or SLIP for Solaris 2.3

I am looking for PPP or SLIP packages for a Solaris 2.3 internet server.
I plan to dialup from my home PC to this machine. There is a SunLink PPP 
product that Sun Express sells for $1K. I wonder if there is any public 
domain packages out there. 

Thank you,

Omid Razavi
oxr1@pge.com
415-973-2052


-----------[000521][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 19:47:19 GMT
From:      mintz@cup.hp.com (Ken Mintz)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Subnetting to be avoided ?

Meschberger (fmeschbe@pax.eunet.ch) wrote:
> I recently heard someone recomending not to use subnetting, i.e.
> not to use a subnetz mask of 255.255.255.0 on a Class B address.
> Is there some issue in that, or is it just hype ?

  I would never dissuade someone from subnetting.  It is too powerful a
  mechanism to ignore.
  
  But there are problems that often arise when subnetting is combined with
  poor network administration.  This might cause some people to consider
  subnetting to be dangerous.

  The basic design problem is that subnetted IP addresses are not self-
  descriptive.  That is, there is no bit encoding that identifies what part
  of the address is a subnet number.  This can actually be viewed as a
  feature under some circumstances.  But it is also a source of
  administrative confusion.

  One problem arises with subnet broadcasts on physical networks where not
  all systems use the same subnet mask.  This can result in unexpected ICMP
  unreachables and even ICMP redirects because the "broadcast" is seen as a
  unicast on some systems.

  Another problem arises on multihomed systems with implementations that do
  not support so-called variable-length subnets.  This often leads to
  unexpected routing taboos that are not accounted for when designing the
  network topology.

-- Ken Mintz

-----------[000522][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 20:06:14 GMT
From:      wmah@wnet.gov.edmonton.ab.ca (Wayne Mah)
To:        comp.sys.novell,comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Packet through-put on CISCO 7000

In article <3aq816$5mg@pheidippides.axion.bt.co.uk>, camerong@syntegra.bt.co.uk (Gary Cameron) says:
>
>CISCO 7000 Through-put.
>
>I am considering the purchase of a couple of CISCO 7000 routers 
>for a network. Does anyone have any test data on the through-put 
>of this product. I am particularly interested in figures for:
>
>Novell          bridging and routing
>TCP/IP  bridging and routing
>DECnet          bridging and routing
>LAT     bridging
>Rest    bridging
>
>We are looking at connecting the CISCO 7000 into an FDDI ring 
>and using Ethernet for the rest of the outlets.
>
>I understand the maximum through-put is 220 000 packets per 
>second. Is there any limitation to  this figure when using the above 
>protocols?

You need at least version 10.0 to get the 200,000+ pps figure for
the SP.  You get this performance with TCP/IP, IPX, SRB, and
transparent bridging.  With 9.x software, the 7000 only does about
110,000 pps.  10.0 and higher supposedly has improved buffering
that accounts for the 2x increase.  I asked Cisco about what type
of buffering scheme was used, but they said it was a trade secret
and would not reveal the algorithm.

>
>Has anyone got good or bad experiences of the CISCO 7000 that 
>they would like to pass on ???

Good experiences.  We have 3 7000s and 1 7010.  The 3 7000s have
been rock solid in the last 15 months of production.  No hardware
failures.  We did, however, run into a couple of production stopping
bugs, but were able to revert back to an older version or get a 
patch right away.  The 7010 was installed just yesterday into the
production network.  It has the SSE, but right now that feature is
turned off until next week.

>
>Thanks 
>Gary Cameron
>
>Mo beachd agamsa...
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>All opinions expressed here my own and not the companies. Maybe...
>Gary Cameron
>
>E-mail camerong@leeds.syntegra.bt.co.uk    (ignore imitation copies)
>Fon    ++ 44 532 XXXXXX 
>----------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000523][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 1994 20:57:42 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <CzML8D.Do8@calcite.rhyolite.com>, vjs@calcite.rhyolite.com (Vernon Schryver) writes:
|> I thought Tony Rall was talking about static routes, not RIP routes.

My misreading; you're right, he probably was talking about static
routes.  In any event, static routes would be pretty useless in this
case if the users roam even a little.

|> Mixing static routes with any kind of routing protocol is a classic
|> recipe for problems.  People who do that almost always start complaining
|> that their static routes mysteriously disappear.

Yep, pretty common.

|> From what I've seen, hosts generally handle host routes just fine,
|> especially those based on BSD code.  Some router boxes have caused

Actually, I've used some reasonably-well-known BSD-based systems whose
'routed's drop host routes.  I have no idea why.

|> problems.  I've seen some simply ignore host routes.  Others decide to
|> trim the host bits and infer network routes.  Before recent releases in
|> which they've finally gotten host routes working well enough, I suffered
|> from a popular brand that would trim the host bits, infer a network
|> route, use their worse than simplistic mapping between RIP and IGRP
							  ^^^^^^^^^^^^

Ha!  Yep, been there, seen that.

The bottom line for users is that there are cross-vendor compatibility
problems, and that you have to fish around for a number of tricks to
work around them.  Sigh.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000524][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      21 Nov 94 21:54:13 GMT
From:      davids@jsbus.com ()
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   HPARPA DOS TCP problem


Hello All,
  I have a customer having problems with HPARPA getting
an ENOBUFS (55) on a send() socket call. I would have expected
an EWOULDBLOCK (35). The version is HPARPA Services for DOS v2.1.
I can't find a manual on this version nor any other docs on
possible parameters that could be used to releive a congestion
problem. Any suggestion would be appriciated. Since I doubt
that this is one others would be interested in, please send
the replies to davids@jsbus.com. Thanks in advance for any
help.
						davids
--
David Sandman   | VSL - Middleware your Network  |JSB Corporation
Sr VSL Engineer | Application is crying out for. |108 Whispering Pines Dr
ph 408.438.8300 | MultiProtocols, MultiPlatforms |Suite 115
fx 408.438.8360 |      Can't you hear it?        |Scotts Valley, CA 95066

-----------[000525][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 08:57:41 +0800
From:      peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au (Peter N Lewis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: passive ftp?

In article <3alqco$5j5@crcnis3.unl.edu>, mgleason@cse.unl.edu (Mike
Gleason) wrote:

>Have you tried my freeware ncftp client lately?
>
>        ftp://ftp.cs.unl.edu/pub/ncftp/ncftp.tgz
>
>It does passive FTP, runs on linux, and does much more.

"and does much more" :-)  This is a huge understatement.  NcFTP is
excellent, highly recomended for all your unix ftping needs...
   Peter.
-- 
Peter N Lewis <peter.lewis@info.curtin.edu.au> - Macintosh TCP fingerpainter

-----------[000526][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Mon, 21 Nov 1994 22:30:11 GMT
From:      lierman@ssd.comm.mot.com (Ken Lierman)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Secure SLIP?


I have a need to SLIP into an internet provider, and then telnet into a remote
machine for work.  There are security issue in doing this. Is there any way to
encrypt packets so that they could not be intercepted on the intermediate machine?

Thanks for the info!!!

Ken



-----------[000527][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 00:01:51 GMT
From:      bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov (Brett Bobley)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <3aporr$mia@juniper.almaden.ibm.com>, trall@almaden.ibm.com
(Tony Rall) wrote:

> You aren't (or shouldn't be) using a 32 bit subnet mask for your slip
> systems, you're using host routes - which is something different.
> (Which is good, because you're also using RIP, and that doesn't work
> properly with variable subnet masks.)  Can RIP be used to broadcast
> host routes?  I don't know.
> 
> But if you manually added a host route to your 3com router, I'd be
> surprised if it didn't work (although I have no experience with 3com).
> 
> I prefer using proxy arp to handle the "routing" for point-to-point
> links.  Why clutter the routing table of every machine on the LAN with
> numerous host routes?  I don't know whether the Netblazer will do
> proxy arp for its remote connections.
> 
> -- 
> Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com

Tony,

Yes, the Netblazer supports proxy arp.  However, for proxy arp I would
have to enter the MAC address of all the machines which might be dialing
in via SLIP.  This kind of defeats the convenience of having a SLIP ip
pool.

I need to learn more about "host routes" and check the 3Com manuals to see
how I can add the routes.

tks for the help,

Brett

-- 
Brett Bobley
U.S. Coast Guard
Washington, DC
Internet: bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov

-----------[000528][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 00:07:29 GMT
From:      johannes@titan.westfalen.de (Johannes Stille)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: PPP via telnet

In article <1994Nov14.235533.28510@iglou.com>,
	Ben Peoples <bpeoples@iglou.iglou.com> wrote:
>Does anybody know if its possible to run PPPD via a telnet (or any way of connecting 
>two computers over the 'net).  It seems that you would just asyncmap (escape out)
>the ^] character...

Generally, it is possible. It isn't supported by every OS, though. I
have read a report from someone who did it with Linux.

I don't think that avoiding the ESC character is enough, isn't telnet a
7-bit protocol? Best solution would be "rlogin -8 -E" (if supported by
your software), as this gives you a completely 8-bit, 256 character
clean line that even can support SLIP.

	Johannes

-----------[000529][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 00:08:17 GMT
From:      bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov (Brett Bobley)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <3aq4gk$fvq@newhub.xylogics.com>, carlson@xylogics.com wrote:

> In article <3aporr$mia@juniper.almaden.ibm.com>,
 trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall) writes:
> |> You aren't (or shouldn't be) using a 32 bit subnet mask for your slip
> |> systems, you're using host routes - which is something different.
> |> (Which is good, because you're also using RIP, and that doesn't work
> |> properly with variable subnet masks.)  Can RIP be used to broadcast
> |> host routes?  I don't know.
> 
> Actually, RIP-2 handles both host routes and variable-length subnet
> masks.
> 
> |> But if you manually added a host route to your 3com router, I'd be
> |> surprised if it didn't work (although I have no experience with 3com).
> 
> I don't think I would be surprised.  Many hosts and routers seem (from
> my experiments here) to ignore host routes since they're not required to
> accept them.
> 
> |> I prefer using proxy arp to handle the "routing" for point-to-point
> |> links.  Why clutter the routing table of every machine on the LAN with
> |> numerous host routes?  I don't know whether the Netblazer will do
> |> proxy arp for its remote connections.
> 
> Why the clutter?  Because it works better if you have multiple servers
> and users have assigned IP addresses.  I agree that for simple
> installations, proxy-ARP alleviates a lot of headaches.  But many
> routers out there will *not* age ARP entries, which makes proxy-ARP
> unworkable for configurations with multiple dial-in servers and dynamic
> addressing.

Why would there be "clutter" ?  Currently, all of the routers in my
building have a single routing entry for my subnet (152.119.253.0 via
152.119.1.253).  Why would they need more?  In other words, I envision MY
3com having to have these "host routes" but not ALL the routers on the
LAN.  Would the use of host routes require that all the routers on my LAN
have an entry for each of my SLIP users?

I guess my ultimate question is (forgive me if this sounds naive):  if all
of the routers on my LAN know to send all 152.119.253.X traffic to my
3Com, why can't my 3Com be smart enough to know that certain addresses
(e.g. 152.119.253.60) go via my Netblazer and the rest are directly
connected to its ethernet port ?

thanks for your help,

Brett

-- 
Brett Bobley
U.S. Coast Guard
Washington, DC
Internet: bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov

-----------[000530][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 00:10:39 GMT
From:      bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov (Brett Bobley)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP for Macintosh

In article <3aqog7$74e@ankh.iia.org>, roxi@roxi. wrote:

> I am looking for a good TCP/IP stack for the Macintosh.  Appreciate any info 
> that could be sent my way.  Thanks,
> 
> roxi@ios.com

Well, we (like most folks) use MacTCP, which is an Apple product.  It is
available from Apple and is also bundled with many Apple comms-related
software (it comes with Versaterm, eXodus, and many others).

I believe that Intercon systems also makes their own TCP stack but I've
never used it.

Brett

-- 
Brett Bobley
U.S. Coast Guard
Washington, DC
Internet: bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov

-----------[000531][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 08:35:58 -0500
From:      rschrack@cyber1.servtech.com (robert schrack)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Class C subnetting

In article <19941120.165448.01@comptech.demon.co.uk>,
Adam Goodfellow <adam@comptech.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>In article <3alcpt$5a9@popp.ins.de>,
>                Andreas Frackowiak <zok@ins.net> wrote:
>
>>loiselle@charm.gandalf.ca (Vance Loiselle) writes:
>>With a netmask of ...192 (2 bits subnet-part 6 bits host-part)
>>You have 4 subnets of a C-class net with each 64 numbers (62 hosts) each.
 
>>With a netmask of ...128 (1 bit subnet-part 7 bits host-part)
>>You have 2 subnets of a C-class net with 128 numbers (126 hosts) each.
>
>A net directed broadcast to x.y.z.255 implies all hosts on (and all
>subnets of) net x.y.z This would clash with a subnet directed broadcast
>to subnet x.y.z.3. I assumed for similar reasons, subnet 0 is not
>allowed either as a conseqence of historical useage for broadcasts, and
>now notational network id use.
>
>This would also imply the netmasks of ...128 in above case would yield
>no useable subnets. (Note: I say useable, one *could* put machines on
>subnets all 1s and all 0s but it I think it would lead to ambiguous
>directed broadcasting.)
>
    This is correct.  According to RFC-950, you should not use a value
of all ones or all zeros in the subnet field.  So if your subnet field is
only one bit (netmask = 128), neither 0 or 1 is allowed to be used.  If
the netmask is 192, you get 2 subnets (x.y.z.64, x.y.z.128).  x.y.z.0 is
now ambiguous since you're not sure if it is the entire network, or just
a subnetted part.
    Also true that you could put hosts on those subnets.  It may work,
it may not.  Novell's tpcip.nlm v.1.0 allowed a netmask of 128 to split
a net into 2 subnets with no problems.  Imagine my surprise when we upgraded
to a new version that wouldn't load because of illegal net masks.

rob

-----------[000532][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 01:00:42 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP connect() on non-blocking socket

> Is their any books talk about the use/behavior of using TCP connect()
> on a non-blocking socket?
> I know the connect itself should return EAGAIN to tell its a non-blocking
> socket, but will the threeway-handshake continue?

Yes, the three-way handshake continues.  If you call select(), the
descriptor will be writable if the connect() completes OK, or readable
if an error occurs.  For the readable case, you can either call getsockopt()
for SO_ERROR to fetch the error value, or call read(), expecting a return
of -1 with errno set to the error value (ECONNREFUSED, ETIMEDOUT, etc.).

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000533][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 01:11:36 GMT
From:      adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stupid telnet negotiation question...

In article <CzJA66.FsH@rex.uokhsc.edu>,
                Benjamin Z. Goldsteen <ben@rex.uokhsc.edu> wrote:

>gfm2@ns2.CC.Lehigh.EDU (GEORGE F. V MOTTER) writes:
>
>
>>I am writing a program in Windows and part of it needs to telnet into a Linux
>>server on port 23, login, and fork to another program.  I have very little
>                               ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^consider using "rsh"
>or "rexec"
>
>>experience in writing telnet code so I have a stupid question.
 
>>I connect to port 23, negotiate my little heart out, but I have no clue how to
>>tell the Linux box that "I'm sick of negotiating, give me the darn login
>>prompt!"  What is the command sequence?
>

Funny - I keep hearding about tel;net logins problems - guess what they
are trying to connect to - yes you've guessed it - a linux box.

Is their a particularly nasty quirk in BSD 4.3 telnet derived telnet
clients that agrivates this?

The telnet on my machine suffers from this as well apparently - only to
linux boxes though, and this client is a port from the BSD 4.3 telnet I
think...

-- 
Adam

=======================================================================
| Computech  Tel/Fax: 0181 673 7817  email: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk |
=======================================================================

-----------[000534][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 01:45:38 GMT
From:      waltjune@winternet.com (Walter June)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: WFW-TCP/IP routing problem to NT

Martin Hadersbeck (hadersbeck@horus.mch.sni.de) wrote:
: Hello
 
: We have a big problem concerning TCP/IP from Microsoft.
: Our network consists of a WIN/NT Advanced Server 3.1 and
: WfW-3.11 Clients running TCP/IP-32. Now the clients connected
: are not all on the same subnet. The problem is that the 
: clients may successfully ping and telnet the server but
: if they want to access shared resources from the server
: there is no way to do that. The only clients which can use
: the servers resources are the ones in the same subnet as 
: server itself. This has to be done by manually entering 
: the correct information in the network browser window, but
: it works.
: But as far as I know is TCP/IP a protocol with routing 
: abilities. So how can it be made possible for all clients
: to profit from the servers resources.

Try putting the other domain(workgroup) names in the lmhost or
host files. Initial copies of these should be in your Windows
directory as lmhost.sam and host.sam and should be renamed
to lmhost or host. The browser in WfWG needs this to find
other domains especially if you are not using NETBEUI
protocol.

--
+--------------------------------------------------+
| Walter C. June     Inet waltjune@winternet.com   |
| Shorewood, MN USA  CIS  71561,3372               |
+--------------------------------------------------+

-----------[000535][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 02:39:34 GMT
From:      patrick@vega.oes.amdahl.com (Patrick Horgan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Address already in use message

This is in the FAQ, but I'll have mercy on you:) After opening the socket,
do something like this:

    int boolean=1;

    . . .
    socket=socket(whatever options);

    if(setsockopt(socket,SOL_SOCKET,SO_REUSEADDR,
                                (char *)&boolean,sizeof(boolean))<0){
        exit or whatever you want here.
    }
    . . . go ahead and use the socket here.


The man page for setsockopt mentions:

SO_REUSEADDR        toggle local address reuse
the boolean argument is non-zero to enable the option.





Patrick

-- 

     These opinions are mine, and not Amdahl's (except by coincidence;).

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  
  /                        |                           | (\               \
 |  Patrick J. Horgan      |  Amdahl Corporation       |  \\    Have       |
 |  patrick@oes.amdahl.com |  1250 East Arques Avenue  |   \\  _ Sword     |
 |  Phone : (408)992-2779  |  P.O. Box 3470 M/S 316    |    \\/    Will    |
 |  FAX   : (408)773-0833  |  Sunnyvale, CA 94088-3470 |   _/\\     Travel |
  \                        |  O16-2294                 |      \)          /
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----------[000536][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 11:04:29 -0500
From:      sthyagar@csc.com (Sudha Thyagarajan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP/IP for Block mode

I was wondering what delimiters one needs to look for
when using TCP/IP for block mode (say Uniscope). 
Looking for Start-of-Text and End-of-Text wouldn't
work for binary data.

Please post or e-mail your reply. Thanks.

Sudha

-----------[000537][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 12:53:43 -0500
From:      andy@learnix (Andy Barclay)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Subnetting to be avoided ?

Actually, I believe the proper term for taking a bunch of class C nets
and making them look like one large net is "supernetting".
Functionally equivalent to subnetting, except that bits are borrowed
from the network portion of the ip instead of the host portion.
A lot of people frown upon this practice, because it may (usually)
involves an netmask with non-contiguous binary 1's.

Regards,
Andy W. Barclay.        andy@learnix.ca

   Isn't it great now that UNIX is user-friendly!
   Why it seems like just yesterday that UNIX was
   responding to my commands with "huh?" or "what?"


-----------[000538][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 94 06:43:31 GMT
From:      ddl@harvard.edu (Dan Lanciani)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP connect() on non-blocking socket

In article <CzMMnu.4Js@tsegw.tse.com>, jliou@tsegw.tse.com (Jack Liou) writes:
| Is their any books talk about the use/behavior of using TCP connect()
| on a non-blocking socket?

No doubt. :)

| I know the connect itself should return EAGAIN to tell its a non-blocking

Be careful here.  The error code is somewhat platform-specific.  Classic
BSD code will return EINPROGRESS.  Winsock (a standard sockets for Microsoft
Windows) uses EINPROGRESS for a completely different purpose and returns
EWOULDBLOCK from a connect on a non-blocking socket.  Of course, these are
just the "errors" that tell you the operation has started and not finished.
Almost any other error could be returned to tell you that the attempt failed
immediately.  Some systems might even return success, indicating that the
connection has already been made.

| socket, but will the threeway-handshake continue?

Indeed.  The connection process is usually already asynchornous and
the blocking status of the socket merely controls whether your process
will wait.  In other words, the connect call does approximately:

if(already connected)
	return EISCONN
if(already connecting)
	return EALREADY
if(attempt to start connect fails)
	return reason
if(socket non-blocking)
	return EINPROGRESS
while(socket is connecting)
	sleep
return status

				Dan Lanciani
				ddl@harvard.*

-----------[000539][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 07:58:22 GMT
From:      tli@cisco.com (Tony Li)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: RFC1597 vs RFC1627

In article <CzML6A.ABL@dorsai.org> seth@amanda.dorsai.org (Seth Bromberger)
writes:  
    Has anyone implemented the procedures detailed in RFC1597, particularly 
    in light of RFC1627?  We're looking into this as a backup measure in the 
    event we can't get a class-B address space, but don't want to be stuck 
    renumbering 8,000 hosts.
    
Yes.  We're using RFC 1597 addresses for the portions of our network that
don't need or want globally unique addresses.  For us, this is primarily
labs.

Tony

-----------[000540][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 08:29:44 GMT
From:      trall@trall.almaden.ibm.com (Tony Rall)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <bobley-2111941901210001@kslip1.apl.jhu.edu>,
Brett Bobley <bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov> wrote:
>
>Yes, the Netblazer supports proxy arp.  However, for proxy arp I would
>have to enter the MAC address of all the machines which might be dialing
>in via SLIP.  This kind of defeats the convenience of having a SLIP ip
>pool.

That's not the way proxy arp is setup.  A machine (in this case, your
Netblazer) doing proxy arp uses its own MAC address.  It simply has to
know the IP addresses of those that it's proxying for.  

On the Netblazer, the command would be something like:

proxy 172.1.1.20 ether 00:00:c0:da:01:1c

which means: when you receive an arp for IP address 172.1.1.20 (which
would be assigned to one of your slip systems), publish the indicated
MAC address - which should the hardware address of the Blazer's
ethernet interface (the same could be done with token ring) - in the
arp response.  You would need one of these commands for each of your
slip connections.

-- 
Tony Rall    trall@almaden.ibm.com

-----------[000541][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 17:15:40 -0500
From:      izzy@panix.com (Izzy Schiller)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP-IP on IBM AS/400

Does anyone have experience of using TCP-IP on the IBM AS/400 
minicomputer. We are trying to connect our AS/400 to Inetenet via the new 
TCP-IP and hope someone tried this before us. 

Please let me know here or email izzy@panix.com

Thank you. 

-----------[000542][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 18:51:46 -0500
From:      pravin@cs.umd.edu (Pravin Bhagwat)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Fast Retransmit feature in TCP

Hi,
	Roughly what % of TCP implementations in the
Internet today support fast retransmission? I suppose 
this feature was added in 4.3 Reno release of TCP. 
I am just wondering if all new releases of TCP, including
those on DOS, Windows and OS/2 also support this.

Thanks

-*- Pravin -*-

-----------[000543][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 01:03:57 -0800
From:      mattc@leland.stanford.edu (Matthew William Clarke)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   IBM Ethernet Credit Card Adapter II packet driver?

Can anyone tell me if there is a packet driver available for the
IBM Ethernet Credit Card Adapter II (it's a PCMCIA ethernet card).
Thanks,
-Matt Clarke
mattc@leland.stanford.edu


-----------[000544][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 94 12:22:39 GMT
From:      hart@apanix.apana.org.au (Leigh Hart)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: How do I put a server on internet?

powers@gwis2.circ.gwu.edu (Eric S Powers) writes:

>We have a server that is running Novell.  It does have the proper TCP/IP 
>connection.
 
>However, whenever we try to access our server from ftp or telnet it says 
>that it is not available.
 
>Are there any suggestions on how we need to set up Novell so that users 
>can access our server via the internet?

Novell what?  Novell have many products, Netware being one, UnixWare
being another.  Please, please, please, when asking questions of a
technical nature, please please please put the technical details in!

Cheers

Leigh
--
| "By the time they had diminished | Leigh Hart                |
|  from 50 to 8, the other dwarves | <hart@eppie.apana.org.au> |
|  began to suspect 'Hungry' ..."  | C/- 195 Gilles Street     |
|   -- Gary Larson, "The Far Side" | Adelaide  SA  5006        |

-----------[000545][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 12:47:12 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <bobley-2111941907470001@kslip1.apl.jhu.edu>, bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov (Brett Bobley) writes:
|> In article <3aq4gk$fvq@newhub.xylogics.com>, carlson@xylogics.com wrote:
 [...]
|> > Why the clutter?  Because it works better if you have multiple servers
|> > and users have assigned IP addresses.  I agree that for simple
|> > installations, proxy-ARP alleviates a lot of headaches.  But many
|> > routers out there will *not* age ARP entries, which makes proxy-ARP
|> > unworkable for configurations with multiple dial-in servers and dynamic
|> > addressing.
|> 
|> Why would there be "clutter" ?  Currently, all of the routers in my
|> building have a single routing entry for my subnet (152.119.253.0 via
|> 152.119.1.253).  Why would they need more?  In other words, I envision MY
|> 3com having to have these "host routes" but not ALL the routers on the
|> LAN.  Would the use of host routes require that all the routers on my LAN
|> have an entry for each of my SLIP users?

Huh?  If all of your remote nodes dialing in are within the same subnet
as the server (152.119.253.0, apparently), then these remote nodes are
proxy-ARPed, they're *not* routed.  You don't need *any* routes in this
case.  Routing has nothing to do with it.

What I was suggesting was that if things got more complicated -- having
more than one dial-in server or having more remote IP addresses than
your subnet can hold, for examples -- you'd probably have to switch to
using routing protocols, in which case either *every* node on the subnet
will need to know about these host routes or you'll need a firewall
between the server and the rest of the net.

|> I guess my ultimate question is (forgive me if this sounds naive):  if all
|> of the routers on my LAN know to send all 152.119.253.X traffic to my
|> 3Com, why can't my 3Com be smart enough to know that certain addresses
|> (e.g. 152.119.253.60) go via my Netblazer and the rest are directly
|> connected to its ethernet port ?

This is done by ARP, not by routing.  The Netblazer will have to answer
ARP queries for those addresses (this is termed "proxy-ARP") and give
its MAC address as the translation for those IP addresses.  This will
work fine, but will break down if (1) the users are actually travelling
sales guys and sometimes plug directly into the net and othertimes dial
in, and you've got a famous-name router, (2) the users are dialing into
more than one server and are apt to hang up and dial right back, or (3)
you've got more users than fit on the subnet.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000546][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 12:51:40 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: PPP via telnet

In article <1994Nov22.000729.9185@osnabrueck.westfalen.de>, johannes@titan.westfalen.de (Johannes Stille) writes:
|> In article <1994Nov14.235533.28510@iglou.com>,
|> 	Ben Peoples <bpeoples@iglou.iglou.com> wrote:
|> >Does anybody know if its possible to run PPPD via a telnet (or any way of connecting 
|> >two computers over the 'net).  It seems that you would just asyncmap (escape out)
|> >the ^] character...
|> 
|> Generally, it is possible. It isn't supported by every OS, though. I
|> have read a report from someone who did it with Linux.
|> 
|> I don't think that avoiding the ESC character is enough, isn't telnet a
|> 7-bit protocol? Best solution would be "rlogin -8 -E" (if supported by
|> your software), as this gives you a completely 8-bit, 256 character
|> clean line that even can support SLIP.

Nope; the TELNET protocol (RFC 854) is guaranteed eight bit clean when
"binary" mode is enabled (RFC 856).  (Most implementations are eight bit
clean even without this option.)  The rlogin protocol (RFC 1282) is not
clean, due to the "window size change" in-band character sequence.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000547][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 13:45:25 GMT
From:      jan.melander@got.wmdata.se (Jan Melander)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   [Q] Multiple proc. to  use the same socket?

Hi,

I'd like to open a socket and pass the descriptor on to another proc that
already exists.
Is this possible? If so, how shall I do it?

Cheers,

Janne
jan.melander@got.wmdata.se

-----------[000548][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 23:49:10 -0600
From:      schmidt@tango.cs.wustl.edu (Douglas C. Schmidt)
To:        comp.object,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.solaris,comp.lang.c++,comp.client-server
Subject:   ACE version 2.15.5 now available

The latest version of the ACE OO network programming toolkit is now
available for anonymous ftp from ics.uci.edu in the file
./gnu/C++_wrappers.tar.Z.  I've enclosed the README file from the
release below.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

	Doug

----------------------------------------
[An HTML version of this README file is available at URL
http://www.cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/ACE.html.  All software and
documentation is available via both anonymous ftp and the Web.]

THE ADAPTIVE COMMUNICATION ENVIRONMENT (ACE)

An Object-Oriented Network Programming Toolkit

OVERVIEW OF ACE

The ADAPTIVE Communication Environment (ACE) is an object-oriented
network programming toolkit.  ACE encapsulates the following
user-level BSD UNIX and System V Release 4 (SVR4) UNIX IPC facilities
via type-secure, object-oriented interfaces:

	. UNIX IPC mechanisms -- Internet- and UNIX-domain sockets,
		TLI, Named pipes (FIFOs) and STREAM pipes (note
		that a Windows NT version of Internet-domain
		sockets is also now available)
	. Event multiplexing via select and poll Solaris and DCE
		pthreads 
	. SVR4 explicit dynamic linking facilities -- 
		dlopen/dlsym/dlclose
	. The mmap family of memory-mapping APIs
	. System V IPC -- shared memory, semaphores, message queues
	. Sun RPC (GNU rpc++, written by Michael Lipp)

In addition, ACE includes a set of higher-level network programming
frameworks that integrate and enhance the lower-level C++ wrappers to
support the dynamic configuration of concurrent network daemons
composed of complex distributed application services.  These
frameworks include the following:

	. Reactor Framework 
	. Service Configurator Framework
	. ADAPTIVE Service Executive Framework 

Many of the C++ wrappers and higher-level components have been
described in issues of the C++ Report, as well as in proceedings of
the following journals, conferences, and workshops:

    	. The 2nd C++ World conference, October, 1993
	. The 11th and 12th Annual Sun Users Group Conference in
		December, 1993 and June, 1994 
	. The 2nd International Workshop on Configurable Distributed
		Systems, March, 1994
	. The 6th USENIX C++ Conference, April, 1994
	. The 1st Conference on the Pattern Languages of Programs,
		August, 1994
	. The 9th OOPSLA Conference held in October, 1994 
	. 3rd C++ World conference in November, 1994
	. The Winter USENIX Conference in January, 1995
	. The OOP conference in Munich, Germany, February, 1995
	. IEE Distributed Systems Engineering Journal, to appear 1995

ACE components are currently being used in a number of commercial
products including the AT&T Q.port ATM signaling software product, the
Ericsson EOS family of PBX monitoring applications, the Motorola
Iridium global mobile communications system.

OBTAINING ACE

ACE is available for anonymous ftp from the ics.uci.edu (128.195.1.1)
host in the gnu/C++_wrappers.tar.Z file (approximately 1 meg
compressed).  This release contains contains the source code,
documentation, and example test drivers for C++ wrapper libraries and
higher-level network programming frameworks developed as part of the
ADAPTIVE project at the University of California, Irvine and
at Washington University.

The following subdirectories are included in C++_wrappers.tar.Z file:

	. apps    -- Several example applications written using the ACE wrappers
        . bin     -- utility programs for building this release
        . build   -- a separate subdirectory that keeps links into the main
                     source tree in order to facilitate multi-platform
                     build-schemes
        . include -- symbolic links to the include files for the release
        . lib     -- object archive libraries for each C++ wrapper library
	. libsrc  -- the source code for the following C++ wrappers:

		. ASX -- higher-level C++ network programming framework
		. Get_Opt -- a C++ version of the UNIX getopt utility
		. SOCK_SAP -- wrapper for BSD sockets
		. TLI_SAP -- wrapper for SVR4 TLI 
		. FIFO_SAP -- wrapper for FIFOS (named pipes)
		. SPIPE_SAP -- wrapper for SVR4 STREAM pipes and connld 
		. Log_Msg -- library API for a local/remote logging
			facility 
		. Mem_Map -- wrapper for BSD mmap() memory mapped files 
		. Message_Queues -- wrapper for SysV message queues
		. Reactor -- a framework for event demultiplexing and
			event handler dispatching 
		. Semaphores -- wrapper for SysV semaphores
		. Service Configurator -- a framework for dynamically
			linking/unlinking 
		. Shared_Memory -- wrapper for SysV shared memory
		. Shared_Malloc -- wrapper for SysV/BSD shared mallocs 
	
	. rpc++ -- C++ interface to Sun RPC developed by Michael Lipp
	           (mnl@dtro.e-technik.th-darmstadt.de).  This code
		   is distributed "as is" (under the GNU GPL) and is 
		   not part of the ACE release that I maintain.
  	. tests -- programs that illustrate how to use the various wrappers
	. WIN32 -- contains the versions of ACE that are ported to 
		   Windows NT (currently on the SOCK_SAP C++ wrappers
		   for sockets are ported)

In addition, a relatively complete set of postscript documentation and
papers is included with the release.  The documentation is stored in
gnu/C++_wrappers_doc.tar.Z file (approximately 2.5 meg compressed).
The following directories are included along with the documentation.

	. doc     -- LaTeX documentation (in both latex and .ps format)
	. papers  -- postscript versions of various papers describing ACE 

Please note that there are companion tar files called
C++_wrappers_doc.tar.Za[a-c].  I used the UNIX "split" command to make
sure each of these files is less than 1.2 Meg in size to accommodate
ACE users who only have access to modem connections on PCs.  To
recreate the original tar file, simply to the following:

% cat C++_wrappers_doc.tar.Za[a-c] doc.tar.Z
% uncompress doc.tar.Z
% tar xvf doc.tar

BUILDING AND INSTALLING ACE

Please refer to the INSTALL file for information on how to build and
test the ACE wrappers.  The overall ACE release is very large (~2
Meg).  Therefore, I'm sorry, but I will be unable to distribute the
ACE wrappers via email.  The BIBLIOGRAPHY file contains information on
where to obtain articles that describe the ACE wrappers and the
ADAPTIVE system in more detail.

The current release has been tested fairly extensively on Sun
workstations running Sun OS 4.1.x and Solaris 2.x using GNU G++ and
Sun C++ 3.x and 4.x.  Portions of the release have also been ported to
SCO UNIX, HP-UX, OSF/1, Windows 3.1 and Windows NT.  I expect that
major portions of the release will port easily to other platforms.  If
anyone is willing to help coordinate ports to other platforms please
let me know.

ACE MAILING LIST

A mailing list is available for discussing bug fixes, enhancements,
and porting issues regarding ACE.  Please send mail to me at the
ace-users-request@ics.uci.edu if you'd like to join the mailing list.

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION FOR ACE

You are free to do anything you like with the ACE source code such as
including it in commercial software.  Moreover, you are under no
obligation to freely redistribute any of your source code that is
built using ACE (be aware that rpc++ is distributed under the GNU GPL,
which has a different copyright policy).  However, you may not do
anything to the original ACE code contained in this release that will
prevent it from being distributed freely (such as copyrighting it,
etc.).  If you have any improvements, suggestions, and or comments,
I'd like to hear about it!  It would be great to see this distributed
evolve into a comprehensive, robust, and well-documented C++ class
library that would be freely available to everyone.  Naturally, I am
not responsible for any problems caused by using these C++ wrappers.

        Thanks,
	
	Douglas C. Schmidt 
	schmidt@cs.wustl.edu 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
        
Special thanks to Paul Stephenson for devising the recursive Makefile
scheme that underlies this distribution, as well as for devoting
countless hours to discussing object-oriented techniques for
developing distributed application frameworks.

Thanks to Olaf Kruger for explaining how to instantiate templates for
shared libraries on SunOS 4.
 

-- 
Dr. Douglas C. Schmidt 			(schmidt@cs.wustl.edu)
Department of Computer Science, Washington University
St. Louis, MO 63130. Work #: (314) 935-7538; FAX #: (314) 935-7302
http://www.cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/

-----------[000549][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 14:17:45 GMT
From:      eickholt@miraculix.mitropa.com (Frank Eickholt)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   screened subnets

HI
I heard from a few people that "screened subnets" were a secure possibilty to
connect a LAN into Internet.
Please, will me someone explain this concept. I know it works a bit like the
fire-wall concept.

So long
FRANK


-----------[000550][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 14:59:15 GMT
From:      msohnius@novell.co.uk (Martin Sohnius)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: nfswatch binary for U.W.??

Paul Smith (cgi@crl.com) wrote:
: Environment: UnixWare SVR4.2, v 1.1.2
 
: I'm having fun hacking nfswatch 4.1 to get it compiled for UnixWare.
 
: It supposed to sniff NFS client/server packets from your
: DLPI device (set to promisuous mode).
 
: Well there's many minor edits to added either NFS or DLPI header files here
: and there and some minor symbol name changes to get it to compile.  But
: it's choking on my Intel ether express 16 device name of ee160, which is
: LAN card 0.  The device node is named /dev/ee16_0.  Well, to make a long
: story short, I've spent about an hour on the source, reading through the 
: main, and following through the device open and dlattach() function 
: and it's failing in the dlokack() function.  giving error message;
: nfswatch: ee160: Error 0.  Given that the device node is named 
                ^^^^^^^
: /dev/ee16_0, this may be understandable.  A physical link to /dev/ee160
: does not fix this problem.
 
: Looking throught the code, there where several assuptions made about
: device names and where the LUN # would be.  
 
: Does anyone have either nfswatch compiled for U.W. or another tool
: that can snoop on what's going on with the NFS client and / or server
: activity??

You'd never get "Error 0" from a failed system call (such as trying to
open the wrong file).  Somewhere perror() (or strerror()) is called under
a condition where the failure either was not due to a failed system call,
or where errno was reset to 0 before the call to perror().

--
                        +----------------------------------+
Martin Sohnius          | "If you can't be funny,          |
Novell Labs Europe      |  at least be interesting."       |
Bracknell, England      |     - Harold W. Ross             |
+44-1344-724031         +----------------------------------+
                        (I speak for myself, not for Novell or anyone else.)

-----------[000551][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 14:59:35 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Address already in use message

In article <mkl.785420717@whoopi> mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de (Mario Klebsch DG1AM) writes:
>Does't the kernel close all open descriptors, when the process exites?
>This is what I learned about UNIX. Do sockets behave different ?

The problem is that file descriptors are not the same as protocol control
blocks. Ultimately the problem is the original question asker didnt RTFM

[hint: man setsockopt]

Alan
-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000552][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 15:11:01 GMT
From:      msohnius@novell.co.uk (Martin Sohnius)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.unix.programmer,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: AIX, ansi and sys/sockets.h

Allen Rueter (allen@wuerl.wustl.edu) wrote:
: The following short program compiles on AIX(RS6000) with the cc
: (extended) but not with c89. Is sys/sockets.h not ansi?
 
: #include <stdio.h>
: #include <errno.h>
: #include <sys/types.h>
: #include <sys/sockets.h>
 
: main() {
:     printf("Hello world\n");
: }
 
: % c89 tst.c
: "/usr/include/sys/socket.h", line 129.2: 1506-046 (S) Syntax error.
: "/usr/include/sys/socket.h", line 139.2: 1506-046 (S) Syntax error.

May I ask to obvious question?  Why post this in comp.unix.unixware?

But, for the record, on UnixWare the compile of your program fails with
the much more sensible error message:

$ cc tst.c
UX:acomp: ERROR: "tst.c", line 4: cannot find include file: <sys/sockets.h>

:-)

--
                        +----------------------------------+
Martin Sohnius          | "If you can't be funny,          |
Novell Labs Europe      |  at least be interesting."       |
Bracknell, England      |     - Harold W. Ross             |
+44-1344-724031         +----------------------------------+
                        (I speak for myself, not for Novell or anyone else.)

-----------[000553][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 16:01:10 GMT
From:      zhebu@svusenet.ubs.ch
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: SunOS 5.3 Server sockets?

: I am attempting to get sockets to work on SunOS 5.3.
 ..
: I have looked at t_connect and t_bind but I am not sure of

Both, the socket and the tli interface work on SunOS 5.3. Sockets are 
implemented as a library. Expect some minor problems with incorrect socket
options that might have worked under some BSD-Systems. To link a socket
program use -lsocket and -lnsl, to link a tli-program -lnsl should do.

--
NAME   Urs Eberle
EMAIL  urs.eberle@zhflur.ubs.ubs.ch

-----------[000554][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 19:08:13 GMT
From:      bernard@cpio1frmug.fr.net (Bernard Fouche)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.unix.programmer,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Select() on pipe() fd problem?

In article <1994Nov18.140608.15575@zh014.ubs.ubs.ch>, zhebu@svusenet.ubs.ch writes:
|> Paul Smith (cgi@crl.com) wrote:
|> ..
|> : Run a program that creates a pipe fd from pipe(), and forks.  The child dup()s
|> : the pipe fd to 0,1,2 and then exec()'s $SHELL -c program a b c.  
|> A pipe is per default one-way. Do you use two pipes, one for 0 and one for 1 
|> and 2? You can't use a pipe like, say, a tcp stream connection fd, where you
|> can read AND write.

pipe(2) under SVR4.0 and later is now built over streams and so each
returned fd can be used to read and write. Have a look at the man page..

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Email                 : bernard@cpio1.frmug.fr.net
Postal Mail           : CPIO S.A., 4 Rue Beaubourg, 75004 Paris, France

-----------[000555][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 19:33:28 GMT
From:      doug@eng.auburn.edu (Doug Hughes)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Xyplex, telnet, zmodem etc


In an earlier posting I had stated that telnet was not 8 bit clean
and rlogin was.. I got it backwards, sort of..   
telnet in binary mode enable is 8 bit clean. Many implementations
do this by default.. Best to check a particular implementation.
 rlogin (RFC1282) is not 8bit clean because of in-band window
size change operations.  use Telnet and the set sess pasthru, avoid
rlogin from the xyplex.  Who knows what weirdness "connect" is. It
looks sort of like telnet, and may be, but I'm not in a position
to know/say.


-- 
____________________________________________________________________________
Doug Hughes					Engineering Network Services
System/Net Admin  				Auburn University
			doug@eng.auburn.edu
"The Light at the end of the tunnel is the headlamp of an oncoming train"

-----------[000556][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 19:37:29 GMT
From:      doug@eng.auburn.edu (Doug Hughes)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Xyplex, telnet, zmodem etc

In article <Czoozt.9wG@mail.auburn.edu>, doug@eng.auburn.edu (Doug Hughes) writes:
> 
> In an earlier posting I had stated....
......stuff deleted....

sorry, wrong newsgroup.. ignore this. (I would cancel, but something
is amiss there, and we don't control the newsserver here)

doug

-----------[000557][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 19:40:41 GMT
From:      frank@beach.silcom.com (Frank Dziuba)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: HELP - Virtual IP addresses

Erik Bos (erik@xs4all.nl) wrote:
: frank@beach.silcom.com (Frank Dziuba) writes:

<snip>

: >That's why you'll often see sites with addresses like "http://www.abc.com/abc"
: >which is pointing to the "abc" directory. To a user who is trying to "guess"
: >a company's web address, this is not an obvious guess. They would be more
: >apt to guess "www.abc.com" for the "abc"company, and end up getting the
: >general home page for "The Mall network"  that the pages are hosted on.
 
: >Most major companies do _not_ want to be part of a "mall", they want to have
: >their own presence. However, maintaining 100 servers for 100 companies is a
: >lot more work than maintainig 1 server with multiple IP addresses.
 
: You can also use setup a small http-server at www.abc.com that send
: a http-relocation for each page to "http://server.com/abc/". Using
: this trick www.abc.com will be accessed when for retrieving /, all
: pages are served from server.com

However, in my example 'www.abc.com' and 'server.com' are the same machine
so you idea won't work.

frank

: --
: Erik Bos	<erik@xs4all.nl>	http://www.xs4all.nl/~erik/


--

Frank Dziuba
Silicon Beach Communications
frank@silcom.com


-----------[000558][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 19:49:27 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

> Why can't I send broadcast UDP datagrams of the same length that point to
> point datagrams? 
> I understand that the IP layer is responsible for fragmenting UDP datagrams
> when their length exceed the MTU of the LAN. This works well for point to point
> datagrams, but not for broadcasting.
> I use SunOS4.1.3 and ethernet. The MTU is 1500, and the maximum size of the messages
> that I can broadcast is 1472.
> Why fragmenting is not performed by IP? Has anyone an idea?
> It doesn't seem logical to me.

This appears to have been an implementation decisions made long ago in
the BSD TCP/IP code, that most vendors just copy.  There's no technical
reason that a UDP datagram destined for a broadcast address cannot be
fragmented--it's a policy decision that broadcasting puts enough of a
load on the network already, so why make it worse by multiplying it by N.
These days, you should consider multicasting instead of broadcasting.

You can always fix it if you have the sources :-)  Just remove the following
test from ip_output():

        if (in_broadcast(dst->sin_addr, ifp)) {
		...
		/* don't allow broadcast messages to be fragmented */
                if ((u_short)ip->ip_len > ifp->if_mtu) {
                        error = EMSGSIZE;
                        goto bad;
                }

    Rich Stevens

-----------[000559][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 94 19:55:05 GMT
From:      ddl@harvard.edu (Dan Lanciani)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

In article <1994Nov21.155508.25315@molene.ifremer.fr>, jpcalvez@ifremer.fr (Jean Pierre Calvez) writes:
| Why can't I send broadcast UDP datagrams of the same length that point to
| point datagrams? 
| I understand that the IP layer is responsible for fragmenting UDP datagrams
| when their length exceed the MTU of the LAN. This works well for point to
| point datagrams, but not for broadcasting.
| I use SunOS4.1.3 and ethernet. The MTU is 1500, and the maximum size of the
| messages that I can broadcast is 1472.
| Why fragmenting is not performed by IP? Has anyone an idea?
| It doesn't seem logical to me.

For quite a while, BSD networking code had a specific check on broadcast
datagrams to be sure they were not large enough to require fragmentation.
If they were too large, they were not sent.  I assume the reasoning was
that broadcast fragments were net-unfriendly; however, it can cause unexpected
behavior (especially on nets with small mtus).  I've removed the check in
every protocol stack I've implemented based on the BSD sources and I've
never had a problem.  If you are up to it, you could probably patch the
SunOS object files and/or merge a release of the BSD code for which
source is available.

				Dan Lanciani
				ddl@harvard.*

-----------[000560][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 20:09:27 GMT
From:      robert@banana.dis.fedex.com (Robert Smith)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   local address reuse

Hi all,

I have a problem with a simple client-server set of programs that are
being used to test the behaviour of the system when the server side	
is killed and then needs to be restarted. The problem in general is	
that the local address stays in a TIME-WAIT condition when the server	
side is killed. The client side detects connection is broken and exits	
normally. When I try to restart the server, I get error: bind()
(125Address already in use). I am unable to restart the server for	
4 minutes because of this condition. I have tried using
setsockopt(SO_LINGER with l_linger=0) and setsockopt(SO_REUSEADDR) in
both the server and the client as well as no setsockopt calls.
 
If just the server process is started and killed, a restart works.

The machine is SUN 1000/Solaris.

The same condition happens on DEC/ultrix but the TIME-WAIT condition
is shorter.
 
Thanks in advance for any info that may help solve this.

-----------[000561][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 20:29:17 GMT
From:      cudrnak@rtsg.mot.com (Scott S. Cudrnak)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Wanted: FTP site for sockets PING source.

Hello,

Is there an FTP site that has the source code for PING (ICMP echo)
using sockets?

Thanks,

Scott

-----------[000562][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 21:02:24 GMT
From:      pang@erg.abdn.ac.uk (Pang Siong Loon)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.nfs
Subject:   Help! PC-NFS

Hi,
I am struggling hard to find a way to change the TCP timer (retransmission timer) and the TCP window size of the PC-NFS version 4.0 and version 5.0.  Is there anybody has the experience to change this two parameters can give me a help?

Please kindly email me at s.l.pang@aberdeen.ac.uk

Thank you very much.

pang
Aberdeen, UK




-----------[000563][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 21:15:31 GMT
From:      jb@projo.com (John Ballem)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Dialup SLIP for Solaris


I'm looking for a good public domain (or not ?) slip for Solaris 2.3 on a sun platform, any idea's ?

Thanks in advance,

jb@projo.com


-----------[000564][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 22:08:56 GMT
From:      robertsr@helios.usq.EDU.AU (roger roberts)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Lanwatch Diags Software

       I am interested in purchasing a product from FTP Software called
Lanwatch however I require answers to some particular questions relating to
card specific versions of this software.

1.Will I be able to filter on MAC or IP addresses and observe CRC,IP checksum
  ,alignment,shorts and longs caused or from a single workstation?
2.Will I be able to save this information to a file and print it out for later
  examination?
3.Will I be able to add alias names so that common hosts may be easily 
  recognised in a report or on data displayed to the screen?
4.Will I be able to nest filters ie. filter on a MAC address and a particular
  protocol?
    
Could you please advise the answers to these questions by return mail.

This is a request for information only.

Thank-you for your assistance.

Roger Roberts               University of Southern Queensland
                                Toowoomba
                                Australia
                        mail: robertsr@usq.edu.au





-----------[000565][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 22:18:43 GMT
From:      aisg@gate.net (Advanced Information Systems Group)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   SPX/IPX to TCP/IP Gateway


Has anyone heard about FEL Computing's LANlink TCP product? It acts as a 
gateway for Novel connected PCs to TCP/IP networks. It enables pooling TCP/IP
licesnses and negates the need for TCP/IP on the desktop. Client software is 
loaded on the PCs, whioch communicate with the gateway via IPX. The clients
include telnet, ftp and a winsock driver. 

There is also a simular product by IPSwitch. Any comments would be 
appreciated. Is this a sound approach?


Thanks,

John Klann
407-774-7181
klann@advinfo.com

-----------[000566][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 22:38:42 GMT
From:      Derek_T.L._Kwan@galaxy.com (Derek T.L. Kwan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   SLIP connection

Hi there...

	I was trying to install CSLIP on COM1 & COM2, and use a NULL MODEM cable to
connect with another PC that also installed CSLIP for COM 1. And meanwhile my
COM 2 was connected to a MODEM, and the other side also have CSLIP installed.
In short, there is a PC that COM 1 was connected to PC 'A' and COM 2 was
connected to PC 'B'.  In theory, I should be able to send data from PC 'A'
through modem, get through my PC then through the NULL modem cable and reach
PC 'B". I have tested the connection between my PC and PC 'A', as well as to
PC 'B' one at a time.(and it works)  However when I installed CSLIP on both
COM port and have no error message, but the TCP Manager (TCPMAN for Windows) 
can only config for ONE com port at a time. Therefore I was not able to use
my PC as a 'BRIDGE'.  Is there a newer version of TCPMAN or something that
will allow me to do things like that?

Diagram:

PC 'A' <------MODEM-----> My PC <--------NULL MODEM CABLE-----> PC 'B'

Derek

-----------[000567][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      22 Nov 1994 22:42:38 GMT
From:      jm@esl.com (Julie Mills)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Where are the Ping and Talk protocols defined?

Where can I get information about these protocols?

Julie




-----------[000568][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 07:17:00 -0500
From:      jeff.binkley@asacomp.com (Jeff Binkley)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   PPP for AIX

  I'm looking for PPP software for AIX v3.X.  IBM doesn't appear to have 
included it with AIX.  If anyone can point me in the right direction I'd 
appreciate it.

                 Jeff Binkley   
                 ASA Compucom

---
...CMPQwk 1.42-09 #9999
CmpQWK 1.42-09 9999


-----------[000569][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 23:12:02 GMT
From:      filip@phil.eunet.be (Filip Vandamme)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   test, pls ignore


Much obliged,
filip

-----------[000570][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Tue, 22 Nov 1994 23:53:57 GMT
From:      filip@phil.eunet.be (Filip Vandamme)
To:        comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Su: oh dear, spray indicates 80 % losses

Hello everybody,

Thanks very much for your numerous responses. Especially, tribute goes to the
following people:

  david.evans.cnv666@nt.com (David Evans), grappone@acsu.buffalo.edu (Matthew
  R. Grappone), raj@cup.hp.com (Rick Jones), kwiatkowski@zrz.tu-berlin.de
  (Manfred Kwiatkowski), cgi@crl.com (Paul Smith), casper@fwi.uva.nl (Casper
  H.S. Dik)

From them, I gathered that (pls. correct me if I'm wrong on this):

Spray seems only to provide a rate for RPC (Remote Procedure Call) performance
between any two RPC compliant hosts. This doesn't only entail the network and
its hardware, but also the main processor speed, amount of RAM, etc (This in
contrast to the CRC checking of ethernet frames). Every time spray sends a
packet, it actually asks for a small (remote) procedure execution, without wai-
ting for its response. At the end the sprayd daemon returns the number of suc-
cessful executions or otherwise socket buffer overflows as failures, accompanied
of the elapsed time necessary for transmission. This explication seems to go
alone with my network observations:

  Doing a spray from a Sparc 2 station to a Sparc 5 station doesn't result in
  packet drops. Alternatively, spraying from the Sparc 5 to the Sparc 2, gives
  an average of 60 % losts (both are on the same ethernet segment). Adjusting
  the delay between packets to 1 us results in no losses at all.

This, would also explain why spray  seem to slow down its transmission rate
over slow links, since elapsed time would only be returned at the end by the
receiving host (I haven't seen the sources to be 100% sure of this though).
  Thus, it would seem that spray's large packet lost could even be monitored on
perfectly healthy systems and networks. Apparently, even in combination with
localhost, as my Solaris 2.3 man pages mention:

 "spray is not useful as a  networking  benchmark.  spray  can report a large
  number of packets dropped when the drops were caused by spray sending packets
  faster than they can be buffered  locally  (before  the  packets  get  to the
  network medium)."

Of course that leaves the question open why interactive sessions occasionaly
freeze on our systems. Do I really have to attach special hardware to pinpoint
the cause. And what symptons should I be looking for? As it occurs very
irregular and as it has always been around (even before I was with the firm)
I found it difficult to believe that I would be a cabling problem.

Much obliged,
filip

-----------[000571][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 02:01:29 GMT
From:      rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Fast Retransmit feature in TCP

>	Roughly what % of TCP implementations in the
> Internet today support fast retransmission? I suppose 
> this feature was added in 4.3 Reno release of TCP. 
> I am just wondering if all new releases of TCP, including
> those on DOS, Windows and OS/2 also support this.

Fast retransmit was 4.3BSD Tahoe (1988) and fast recovery was 4.3BSD Reno
(1990) so there's no reason whatsoever for any vendor not to include
them today.  If you find any without it, please post their names :-)

On Unix systems you can run nm(1) and grep for tcprexmtthresh (since most
poeple just copy the code) as a verification that your system has it.  I
just looked at an old SVR4.0 with a really old Lachman TCP/IP stack and
it has the variable.  The presence of the variable only verifies fast
retransmit--there's no easy way to check for the fast recovery code.

	Rich Stevens

-----------[000572][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 11:22:19 -0500
From:      smartin@cpisun3.navsea.navy.mil (Sam Martin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Printing via WAN:Newbie

Hi All:

Printing fm Unix S5R4 using lpd to an Intel Netport ExpressXL configured 
for ip. Pretty confident of the Netport config, likewise print services setup.
We have had success wwhen the Netport is on our local segment.

As best as I can tell, we are 3 hops from the lan the netport is on. We use 
Novell LWG for DOS, but assign the Netport a static ip address. We cannot
ping the netport from our segment, but a client on the same segment as the 
netport respondes to a ping OK. The netport can be pinged from that segment.
There are 2 SYTEK bridges which I am not including in the hop count. We have
registered the Ethernet address of the netport with both bridges, as they 
will not pass ipx traffic,.....reminder:Newbie appears in subject, I may be
garbling some of this.....Intel suggests they cannot be responsible for 
reliable operation with hop count of 4 or greater.
The netport will not reply to ping from a Wellfleet with same subnet number,
but which sits on the other side of the 2 SYTEK bridges.
My question? The SYTEK bridges, what do they care about an Ethernet address?
If the tcpip address is correct, and I'm confident of that, what does the 12
byte NIC address have to do eith any of this?
I need a FAQ!!! 
TIA
Sam

-----------[000573][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 05:11:40 GMT
From:      bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov (Brett Bobley)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <3asp8g$knu@newhub.xylogics.com>, carlson@xylogics.com wrote:

> In article <bobley-2111941907470001@kslip1.apl.jhu.edu>,
 bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov (Brett Bobley) writes:
> |> In article <3aq4gk$fvq@newhub.xylogics.com>, carlson@xylogics.com wrote:
 [...]
> |> > Why the clutter?  Because it works better if you have multiple servers
> |> > and users have assigned IP addresses.  I agree that for simple
> |> > installations, proxy-ARP alleviates a lot of headaches.  But many
> |> > routers out there will *not* age ARP entries, which makes proxy-ARP
> |> > unworkable for configurations with multiple dial-in servers and dynamic
> |> > addressing.
> |> 
> |> Why would there be "clutter" ?  Currently, all of the routers in my
> |> building have a single routing entry for my subnet (152.119.253.0 via
> |> 152.119.1.253).  Why would they need more?  In other words, I envision MY
> |> 3com having to have these "host routes" but not ALL the routers on the
> |> LAN.  Would the use of host routes require that all the routers on my LAN
> |> have an entry for each of my SLIP users?
> 
> Huh?  If all of your remote nodes dialing in are within the same subnet
> as the server (152.119.253.0, apparently), then these remote nodes are
> proxy-ARPed, they're *not* routed.  You don't need *any* routes in this
> case.  Routing has nothing to do with it.
> 
> What I was suggesting was that if things got more complicated -- having
> more than one dial-in server or having more remote IP addresses than
> your subnet can hold, for examples -- you'd probably have to switch to
> using routing protocols, in which case either *every* node on the subnet
> will need to know about these host routes or you'll need a firewall
> between the server and the rest of the net.
> 
> |> I guess my ultimate question is (forgive me if this sounds naive):  if all
> |> of the routers on my LAN know to send all 152.119.253.X traffic to my
> |> 3Com, why can't my 3Com be smart enough to know that certain addresses
> |> (e.g. 152.119.253.60) go via my Netblazer and the rest are directly
> |> connected to its ethernet port ?
> 
> This is done by ARP, not by routing.  The Netblazer will have to answer
> ARP queries for those addresses (this is termed "proxy-ARP") and give
> its MAC address as the translation for those IP addresses.  This will
> work fine, but will break down if (1) the users are actually travelling
> sales guys and sometimes plug directly into the net and othertimes dial
> in, and you've got a famous-name router, (2) the users are dialing into
> more than one server and are apt to hang up and dial right back, or (3)
> you've got more users than fit on the subnet.

James,

I appreciate the information. I will try using proxy-arp on my Netblazer
tomorrow and see if it solves my problem.  I guess the failure in my
reasoning was as follows:  I pictured the dynamic SLIP interface as being
analogous to a second ethernet interface.  Hence, I figured that hosts on
my network had to "route" through the Netblazer's ethernet port in order
to reach the SLIP "port".    But because they were both part of the same
subnet, the 3Com could not do the routing.

Just curious, though:  what if I connected my Netblazer directly to my
building LAN (which uses 152.119.1.X network)?  I could then assign its
ethernet port an address like 152.119.253.28 and then assign the SLIP port
something like 152.119.254.1 (remember that I'm using a 24-bit mask). 
This would put them on two different subnets.  Would this enable me to
"route" to my SLIP connections rather than having to use proxy-arp?

thanks again,

Brett

-- 
Brett Bobley
U.S. Coast Guard
Washington, DC
Internet: bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov

-----------[000574][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 05:21:11 GMT
From:      kruckenb@sal.cs.utah.edu (Pete Kruckenberg)
To:        comp.protocols.ppp,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.os.linux.development
Subject:   How to write v.35 driver?

I'm going to be writing a few drivers for a v.35 (high-speed
sychronous serial) board for Linux. The first driver will be whatever
is used to connect via "dedicated" (DDS) 56kbps or T-1 (E-1)
link. I've read in many places that this is just HDLC between the v.35
board and the CSU/DSU. I need to find out, though, if it's just HDLC,
or if it's PPP as well. Or, should I abstract it and make it just HDLC
and let the OS determine if it should be using PPP, SLIP, etc?

Where is a good source for learning how all of these things work, as
far as data communications go? I'm looking for something of a more
technical nature, that explains where and when the various protocols
are used, plus how the protocols work, etc. On-line resources are
preferrable, but I welcome recommendations for books, magazines, etc,
as well.

Thanks for your help.
Pete Kruckenberg
pete@dswi.com
kruckenb@sal.cs.utah.edu

-- 
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Pete Kruckenberg                       School: kruckenb@sal.cs.utah.edu
  University of Utah                       Work: pete@dswi.com
  Computer Engineering    For even more addresses, "finger pete@dswi.com"

-----------[000575][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 09:32:44 GMT
From:      haen@bbn.hp.com (Herbert Neugebauer)
To:        comp.unix.osf.misc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Secure Login / File Transfer

Hi,

I'm currently involved in a project to provide a WAN network and
systems management solution for a european bank. For them security
is of course a big issue.

For our beta release we're still using rlogin and ftp for login
and file transfer purposes. But using these tools we have to send
passwords (somtimes even the root password) over the network.
Since the bank uses DCE on each machine I'm now wondering if there
are already tools available based on DCE rpc's and DCE security
features that implement secure logins or file transfers over
the net (WAN!) without the need to transfer passwords.

I have to admit that I'm new to DCE so I would really appreciate
any help even if you consider it to be something that everybody
should already know.

  Thanx in advance

          Herbert

-- 
--- Herbert Neugebauer            private eMail: haen@veces.bb.bawue.de ---
 |  Hewlett Packard GmbH Boeblingen    HP eMail: haen@hpbbn.bbn.hp.com   |
 |  Herrenberger Str. 130    Werk 4    HP Phone: +49 7031 14 7318        |
 |  NSMD - Solution Engineering        HP Fax  : +49 7031 14 1388        |
 |  Network & System Management Division         Germany                 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 |  #include <std.disclaimer> : The statements above are my own and do   |
 |                    not necessarily reflect official policies of HP.   |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000576][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 09:42:48 GMT
From:      guargua@radar.iet.unipi.it
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Simple FTP C code

I'm looking for simple example of FTP code in C language.
Where could I find it?
Tanks for any pointers.

Giacomo Guarguaglini

-----------[000577][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 23:10:38 -0800
From:      skl@ScalableNetwork.com (Samuel Lam)
To:        comp.protocols.nfs,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ip broadcast towards udp discard port, why?

In article <3avkfd$l8n@uxmain.nlr.nl>, graat@uxfiles.nlr.nl (graat j.w.) wrote:
>during network analyses I found several packets broadcasted by pc
>machines to the standard udp discard port (port 9). Does anybody have
>any idea what this is used for?

Software license enforcement.

...Sam
-- 
<skl@ScalableNetwork.com> -- Scalable Network Systems Ltd.


-----------[000578][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 20:15:59 -0500
From:      barmar@nic.near.net (Barry Margolin)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Where are the Ping and Talk protocols defined?

In article <3ats4u$m1t@gatekeeper.svl.trw.com> jm@esl.com writes:
>Where can I get information about these protocols?

Ping uses ICMP Echos, so it's defined in the ICMP protocol specification,
RFC 792.

I don't think Talk is formally defined anywhere.  Which is why
implementations differ (its definition is the source code, and it has
machine dependencies).
-- 

Barry Margolin
BBN Internet Services Corp.
barmar@near.net

-----------[000579][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 14:36:59
From:      schweier@wirtschaft.uni-kassel.de (Thomas Schweier)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   How to configure the LPD server?

Hello,

I have configured a PC 486 as an lpd server connected to an hpiv laserjet 
printer.  Now I have the following problem: if I print  from another 
pc to the hpiv with the command lpr,  the file was sent to the server, but 
then I got the following message:

PRINTER ERROR: error printing on printer hpiv on device com2.

But when I print  to the device com2 on dos, there were no problems.

Can anybody help me. 

Thanks, 

Thomas Schweier, e-mail: schweier@wirtschaft.uni-kassel.de



-----------[000580][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 13:31:25 GMT
From:      carlson@Xylogics.COM (James Carlson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: (Q) SLIP & Subnetting

In article <bobley-2311940011080001@kslip1.apl.jhu.edu>, bobley@mailstorm.dot.gov (Brett Bobley) writes:
[...]
|> I appreciate the information. I will try using proxy-arp on my Netblazer
|> tomorrow and see if it solves my problem.  I guess the failure in my
|> reasoning was as follows:  I pictured the dynamic SLIP interface as being
|> analogous to a second ethernet interface.  Hence, I figured that hosts on
|> my network had to "route" through the Netblazer's ethernet port in order
|> to reach the SLIP "port".    But because they were both part of the same
|> subnet, the 3Com could not do the routing.

Most TCP/IP implementations will install an "interface route" for these
proxy-ARPed interfaces on the box to which the SLIP link is attached.
These interfaces aren't "real" routes though, and they're not advertised
to the net so no other box should be aware of them.

Don't confuse routing and forwarding.  "Forwarding" is the process of
deciding what to do with packets that you receive which don't have your
address on them.  "Routing" is the process of creating and maintaining
some of the tables used by the fowarding code.  In the case of
proxy-ARP, all you're doing is forwarding between interfaces, you're
not doing routing at all.

|> Just curious, though:  what if I connected my Netblazer directly to my
|> building LAN (which uses 152.119.1.X network)?  I could then assign its
|> ethernet port an address like 152.119.253.28 and then assign the SLIP port
|> something like 152.119.254.1 (remember that I'm using a 24-bit mask). 
|> This would put them on two different subnets.  Would this enable me to
|> "route" to my SLIP connections rather than having to use proxy-arp?

You wouldn't be able to use 152.119.253.28 as its Ethernet interface IP
address.  152.119.1.28 would be a lot more reasonable.  Ethernet is a
broadcast medium, and all interfaces attached to it must have IP
addresses within the same subnet range.  (Unless you're putting two
distinct subnets on the same physical medium.  This is possible to do,
but nodes on the different subnets will not be able to talk without
going through a router.)

Yes, your SLIP interfaces could have remote addresses configured that
way, and you'd have to use routing to advertise their existence to the
rest of the world.

---
James Carlson <carlson@xylogics.com>            Tel:  +1 617 272 8140
Annex Software Support / Xylogics, Inc.               +1 800 225 3317
53 Third Avenue / Burlington MA  01803-4491     Fax:  +1 617 272 2618

-----------[000581][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 00:25:56 +0800
From:      alan@belhk.com (Alan Chan)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sys.mac.apps,comp.sys.mac.comm
Subject:   Re: Dial-on demand PPP for Macintosh LAN?

In article <199411201104.AA03993@goemon.gol.com>, hahne@goemon.gol.com (Bruce M. 
Hahne) writes:
> Sorry if this question belongs elsewhere, but I think I'm hitting in 
> the right vicinity with my choice of newsgroups.  So far I've checked 
> the comp.sys.mac.comm FAQ, Eric Behr's MacTCP info file, and 
> MacWorld's "Networking Bible" looking for an answer to no avail. 
>  
> BACKGROUND:  Under Unix (my site uses BSD386), it's possible to 
> configure a machine as a gateway to the Internet and run 
> dial-on-demand SLIP or PPP from the Unix box.  In other words, I 
> could have a LAN, and the Unix box watches the IP traffic on the LAN, 
> and whenever the Unix system sees a packet which needs to go out to 
> the Internet, the Unix box dials out on a modem and establishes a 
> PPP connection with an upstream provider. 
>  
> QUESTION:  Is similar software available for a Macintosh?  I'm advising 
> a company which has about 15 Macs on an ethernet LAN and wants 
> Internet connectivity.  They've got a spare machine they could dedicate 
> to serving as a PPP/router/dial-up machine, but if the software 
> doesn't exist then they'll have to go with a (more expensive) 
> dedicated dial-on-demand router.  They're trying to keep costs low, so 
> the Mac-based solution is preferrable if it's available. 
>  
> Will TCP/Connect II handle dial-on-demand IP routing for a LAN?  
> Does anybody's software do this? 
>  
Hi,

Although the following is not a real *dial on demand* solution, it might be helpful if budget is 
tight.

You could use PortShare from Stalker Software. We did evaluate PortShare with TCP/Connect II 
on an thernet LAN to access Internet through PPP dial-up. It works just fine.

Alan


_______________________________________
Alan Chan
alan@belhk.com
_______________________________________


-----------[000582][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 13:56:44 GMT
From:      tuyo@mumford.mit.edu (Mike M. Tuyo)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Communication with a box using X.25?


I was looking for pointers on where to look for things.  I'm working on
a project that needs to communicate with an X.25 machine.

Basically we have an X.25 card for the HP we're using, and some supporting
software it.  Does anyone know of things written to send tcp sockets
to an X.25 machine?  I'd appreciate any help.

-thanx


-----------[000583][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 14:43:57 GMT
From:      graat@uxfiles.nlr.nl (graat j.w.)
To:        comp.protocols.nfs,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   ip broadcast towards udp discard port, why?

Hi everyone,

during network analyses I found several packets broadcasted by pc
machines to the standard udp discard port (port 9). Does anybody have
any idea what this is used for? I cannot think of any reason for doing
this.

Source address:      <host ip address>
       port:         9
Destination address: 255.255.255.255
            port:    9

The data in the packets is 14 bytes long and starts with 'PC-NFS'
followed by eight ascii characters (looks like a hexadecimal string).
My guess is it has something to do with pc-nfs, but what?

Regards,

Jonh Graat
--
   John Graat  
   Informatics Division, IR-NOP           |  email:  graat@nlr.nl
   The National Aerospace Laboratory NLR  |  phone:  +31 5274 8444
   Voorsterweg 31, 8316 PR Marknesse      |  direct: +31 5274 8437
   P.O. Box 153, 8300 AD Emmeloord        |  fax:    +31 5274 8210
   The Netherlands                        |


-----------[000584][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 14:47:31 GMT
From:      seth@dorsai.org (Seth Bromberger)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Another subnetting question

If an organization had a class-B address, would it be possible to subnet 
it as follows?

4 x 16K hosts (2 usable subnets)

and from one of these 16K-host subnets, further subnet into

8 x 2K hosts (6 usable subnets)

giving, in one class-B address space, one subnet of 16K hosts and 6 
subnets of 2K hosts each?

I understand that there might be a problem with this as far as RIP is 
concerned, but wouldn't OSPF or BGP-4 take care of it?

Please respond via email.  Thanks.

Seth Bromberger

-----------[000585][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 15:33:20 GMT
From:      nelson@crynwr.crynwr.com (Russell Nelson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Faking out a router for ftp mirrors?

We've all seen how various popular ftp sites (ftp.uu.net, wuarchive,
SimTel, SunSite) have mirrors in various places.  The problem, of
course, is deciding which mirror to use.  Well, I was wondering if it
might not be possible to have all the SimTel (e.g.) mirrors use the
same IP address, and change the routing depending on where you are.
For example, PSI could put a SimTel mirror on their backbone, AlterNet
on theirs, etc., and set a route to their own mirror.

Obviously the host would have to have its own real IP address for the
net it was actually on, otherwise it wouldn't be able to do the
mirroring that lets it keep its files updated.  The IP stack on the
mirror host would have to support IP address aliasing, as does BSD/OS
and Linux.  That's not the hard part.  The hard part is getting the
routing correct so that multiple parts of the Internet can have
different routes to the same IP address.

Can this be done?

--
-russ <nelson@crynwr.com>    http://www.crynwr.com/crynwr/nelson.html
Crynwr Software   | Crynwr Software sells packet driver support | ask4 PGP key
11 Grant St.      | +1 315 268 1925 (9201 FAX)  | What is thee doing about it?
Potsdam, NY 13676 | What part of "Congress shall make no law" eludes Congress?

-----------[000586][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 16:03:53 GMT
From:      haen@bbn.hp.com (Herbert Neugebauer)
To:        comp.unix.osf.misc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.admin,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Secure Login / File Transfer

In article <3av27s$2c2@hpbblb.bbn.hp.com>,
Herbert Neugebauer <haen@hpbbn.bbn.hp.com> wrote:
>Hi,
>
>I'm currently involved in a project to provide a WAN network and
>systems management solution for a european bank. For them security
>is of course a big issue.
>
>For our beta release we're still using rlogin and ftp for login
>and file transfer purposes. But using these tools we have to send
>passwords (somtimes even the root password) over the network.
>Since the bank uses DCE on each machine I'm now wondering if there
>are already tools available based on DCE rpc's and DCE security
>features that implement secure logins or file transfers over
>the net (WAN!) without the need to transfer passwords.
>
>I have to admit that I'm new to DCE so I would really appreciate
>any help even if you consider it to be something that everybody
>should already know.

What I forgot to mention in the post above, the tools I'm looking
for do not necessarily need to be based on DCE. I know that DCE on
a WAN network (especially using X.25) can be a performance problem.

Thanx in advance

       Herbert

-- 
--- Herbert Neugebauer            private eMail: haen@veces.bb.bawue.de ---
 |  Hewlett Packard GmbH Boeblingen    HP eMail: haen@hpbbn.bbn.hp.com   |
 |  Herrenberger Str. 130    Werk 4    HP Phone: +49 7031 14 7318        |
 |  NSMD - Solution Engineering        HP Fax  : +49 7031 14 1388        |
 |  Network & System Management Division         Germany                 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 |  #include <std.disclaimer> : The statements above are my own and do   |
 |                    not necessarily reflect official policies of HP.   |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000587][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 00:29:50 -0500
From:      tla@io.org (Steve Thompson)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Prioritizing different IP packets?


I'm not sure that this is the correct forum for this question, but I'm gonna
ask anyways....

I'm curious to find out how one might go about prioritizing packets. 
Specifically, I'm using PPP over and async line and I'd like to relegate
packets generated by a ftp session to a lower priority than the ones 
generated by telnet. 

Telnet kinda sucks when I'm using ftp simultaneously.  The reasong that I'm
unsure of the sutibility of this message relates to how this is implimented.

Is this something that should be configured/hacked into my kernal, or is
there a more mundane solution?  I was informed by someone that this 
facility is specd out somewhere, but I am unable to determine where.

Any direction would be appreciated.

Regards,

Steve Thompson

-----------[000588][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 18:01:09
From:      fks@ftp.com  (Frances K. Selkirk)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: DHCP Info ???

In article <3ap0gr$e37@cnj.digex.net> ajguido@cnj.digex.net (A.J. Guido) writes:

> I'm looking for any info on DHCP ( Dynamic Host Configuration 
> Protocol). I have RFC1531, so I sort of know how the protocol 
> works, but what I'm really after is real-world experience.  Has 
> anyone successfully implemented DHCP? If so, with what products?

We have a DHCP server in our new Services OnNet product for Windows -
I think it may still be the only commercial DHCP server available. In
contrast, several (most?) of the current TCP/IP packages for DOS
and/or Windows include DHCP clients. 

Enjoy,

--
Frances K. Selkirk                                        fks@ftp.com
FTP Software, Inc.    Technical Information Services   (800) 382-4FTP
---------------------------------------------------------------------
FTP server = ftp.ftp.com        BBS =508-659-6240  |  support@ftp.com
WWW server = http://www.ftp.com                    |  info@ftp.com


-----------[000589][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 18:42:28
From:      fks@ftp.com  (Frances K. Selkirk)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Lanwatch Diags Software

In article <robertsr.785542136@helios> robertsr@helios.usq.EDU.AU (roger roberts) writes:

>        I am interested in purchasing a product from FTP Software called
> Lanwatch however I require answers to some particular questions relating to
> card specific versions of this software.
> 
> 1.Will I be able to filter on MAC or IP addresses and observe CRC,IP checksum
>   ,alignment,shorts and longs caused or from a single workstation?

Yes. 

> 2.Will I be able to save this information to a file and print it
> out for later examination?

You can't print out the error count screen, or at least you couldn't
in the last version (I confess I do not have the latest on my PC),
but you can save all the traffic collected, and check it again. For
printable files, we have three options:

	 The full saved trace
	 Statistics for all TCP connections in the saved trace
	 A list of protocols and packet lengths in the saved trace,
	   sorted by source and/or destination MAC-layer addresses

> 3.Will I be able to add alias names so that common hosts may be easily 
>   recognised in a report or on data displayed to the screen?

Yes.

> 4.Will I be able to nest filters ie. filter on a MAC address and a particular
>   protocol?

You can use one operator (AND, OR, or NOT) per filter. 

Regards,

--
Frances K. Selkirk                                        fks@ftp.com
FTP Software, Inc.        Technical Support            (800) 382-4FTP
---------------------------------------------------------------------
FTP server = ftp.ftp.com        BBS =508-659-6240  |  support@ftp.com
WWW server = http://www.ftp.com                    |  info@ftp.com


-----------[000590][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 18:15:07 GMT
From:      dd.id=ahdnn1a.dzx6nq/@diamondnet.sprint.com (Dave Sabbagh)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Bandwidth Calculations for TCP/IP  -  tcpip_q.txt [1/1]  -  tcpip_q.txt [1/1]

WAN Bandwidth Estimation - TCP/IP                                               
                                                                                
I'm looking for information regarding estimating                                
WAN bandwidth for my client/server application.                                 
The application has PC/Windows as the client and an                           
IBM 3090/MVS as the server.  The PC/Windows front end                           
is written in MS Visual C++ and the 3090/MVS server is                          
written in C.  Remote Procedure Calls (RPC) are used                            
to connect the client with the server.  Communication                          
is via TCP/IP over our company's internal TCP/IP network.                                                    
                                                                                
We have estimated average and peak concurrent end user                          
logons,  application data transmission sizes (about 1200 bytes),                                   
the RPC usage within the application, and allowed                               
network response times (about 3 seconds). We have added the overhead                              
of TCP/IP to our application data transmission  
size.                                                                           
                                                                                
Does anyone know of a formula or other metrics that we
can use to calculate the bandwidth required?                              
A formula that tells me if I need 56Kbps, 128Kbps, 
512Kbps, or T1 is what I need. 

-----------[000591][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 18:38:26 GMT
From:      aa839@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Peter Burke)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Job offer - C SPX Netbios APPC TCP/IP, Canada


+-----------------------------------------------------+
|                       URGENT                        |
|           COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE DEVELOPER         |
+-----------------------------------------------------+
 
Communications software developer urgently required for a large Montreal,
Canada based software development company.  Experience in one or more of
C, SPX, Netbios, APPC, TCP/IP is required.  Applicant must be functional 
in a French language environment.  Position is permanent, salary is open.
 
Please contact
Ed Kaluzny
ConsulPRO
1550, boul. de Maisonneuve ouest, Suite 1040
Montreal, QC  H3G 1N2
CANADA
telephone: (514) 932-9523
fax: (514) 932-9562
--
Peter Burke            aa839@freenet.carleton.ca            Montreal, Canada
--

-----------[000592][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 18:50:52 GMT
From:      static@caprica.com (Static/riskin/stolarz)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   SLIP for SPARC

I am trying to get a version of the old maligned SLIP software that will
compile on a sparc under Gnu C.  Or, I would like someone who happens to
have sliplogin compiled on a sparc to let me get a copy.  Our internet
service provider provides slip still, not PPP and we need to connect
.

Thank you in advance

static@caprica.com



-----------[000593][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 17:28:04 +0100
From:      robjan@rabo.nl (Rob Janssen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: RFC1597 vs RFC1627

In <CzML6A.ABL@dorsai.org> seth@amanda.dorsai.org (Seth Bromberger) writes:

>Has anyone implemented the procedures detailed in RFC1597, particularly 
>in light of RFC1627?  We're looking into this as a backup measure in the 
>event we can't get a class-B address space, but don't want to be stuck 
>renumbering 8,000 hosts.

Yes, we are using this in our planned addressing scheme which is already
implemented at some test sites.

The comments in RFC1627 don't address the problem depicted in RFC1597.
Also, they don't outline an alternative solution that is practical.
It is easy to write comments like that, but not very productive.

Rob

-----------[000594][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 94 19:34:41 GMT
From:      ddl@harvard.edu (Dan Lanciani)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Fast Retransmit feature in TCP

In article <3au7pp$ljl@noao.edu>, rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens) writes:
| >	Roughly what % of TCP implementations in the
| > Internet today support fast retransmission? I suppose 
| > this feature was added in 4.3 Reno release of TCP. 
| > I am just wondering if all new releases of TCP, including
| > those on DOS, Windows and OS/2 also support this.
| 
| Fast retransmit was 4.3BSD Tahoe (1988) and fast recovery was 4.3BSD Reno
| (1990) so there's no reason whatsoever for any vendor not to include
| them today.  If you find any without it, please post their names :-)
| 
| On Unix systems you can run nm(1) and grep for tcprexmtthresh (since most
| poeple just copy the code) as a verification that your system has it.  I
| just looked at an old SVR4.0 with a really old Lachman TCP/IP stack and
| it has the variable.  The presence of the variable only verifies fast
| retransmit--there's no easy way to check for the fast recovery code.

Beware, though, that the original BSD implementation of fast retransmit
used a static threshold that worked well over a particular range of
MSS:window ratios.  In particular, for systems with very small buffers
that used small windows, the code would often fail to kick in at all.
Although it was more of a problem then than now, such systems were also
the ones most likely to drop a packet, thus defeating the purpose...
(A 3c501 is a good (bad?) example of such a target.)  It is possible to
scale the threshold per connection, but not everybody does it.  Of course,
if they do, then you likely *won't* see the tcprexmtthresh as a global!

				Dan Lanciani
				ddl@harvard.*

-----------[000595][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 19:38:47 GMT
From:      Martin J. Hannigan <hannigan@bose.com>
To:        comp.protocols.nfs,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc
Subject:   Re: PC-NFS 5.0 Telnet & TelnetW ^S/^Q question

In article <LELAM.94Nov15104251@sparcplug> Len E. Elam,
ElamLE@LFWC.Lockheed.Com writes:
> If I could figure what to put in the TNINIT.ECF and TNWINIT.ECF files
> to keep ^S from acting as the HOLD key, I suspect that would take care
> of the problem.

Couldn't you code an stty command as soon as your script logged in? (If
that's how far you're going).

Regards,

--
Martin J. Hannigan (hannigan@bose.com) (martinh@mit.edu)
Bose Corporation - Engineering Systems
System Adminstrator - Unix/Internet Services
Meeting Director - Boston Computer Society Internet SIG

-----------[000596][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 19:58:06 GMT
From:      dingle@ksvi.mff.cuni.cz (Adam Dingle)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Looking for up-to-date overview of Internet routing

I'm looking for a up-to-date overview of Internet routing, including protocols
such as EGP, BGP, RIP, and so on.  I have read Comer, Volume I, chapters 13-15,
but the book is 3 years old and I think that probably much has changed in that
time.  Comer implies in ch. 14 that there is a core autonomous system, perhaps
using the SPREAD protocol, surrounded in a tree structure by independent
autonomous systems, and that autonomous systems communicate using EGP.  Do
those statements remain valid today?  Comer doesn't really say who manages
this core autonomous system - so who does?  The NIC?  Where does this core
system extend - only within the United States, or internationally?  Or has
the very idea of a core system changed or vanished in the last several years?

Obviously, I would love to find a comprehensive, up-to-date overview, but barring
that I would be quite interested in on-line information, RFC's, books, or articles
which address routing issues and describe and compare routing protocols.

I would REALLY appreciate any tips.  Thanks!

Adam Dingle
dingle@ksvi.mff.cuni.cz
Lecturer in Informatics

-----------[000597][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Wed, 23 Nov 1994 21:04:10 UNDEFINED
From:      a2312bb@sunmail.lrz-muenchen.de (Stephan Hermelink)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   PC as nameserver?

Hi out there,

is there any program to run a PC as nameserver (dos wor windows)?

thanks, 

-Stephan

-----------[000598][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 23:39:50 GMT
From:      arnaud@asgard.calvacom.fr (Arnaud KOPP)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: nfswatch binary for U.W.??

Martin Sohnius (msohnius@novell.co.uk) wrote:
: Paul Smith (cgi@crl.com) wrote:
: : Environment: UnixWare SVR4.2, v 1.1.2
 
: : I'm having fun hacking nfswatch 4.1 to get it compiled for UnixWare.
 
: : It supposed to sniff NFS client/server packets from your
: : DLPI device (set to promisuous mode).
 
: : Well there's many minor edits to added either NFS or DLPI header files here
: : and there and some minor symbol name changes to get it to compile.  But
: : it's choking on my Intel ether express 16 device name of ee160, which is
: : LAN card 0.  The device node is named /dev/ee16_0.  Well, to make a long
: : story short, I've spent about an hour on the source, reading through the 
: : main, and following through the device open and dlattach() function 
: : and it's failing in the dlokack() function.  giving error message;
: : nfswatch: ee160: Error 0.  Given that the device node is named 
                 ^^^^^^^
: : /dev/ee16_0, this may be understandable.  A physical link to /dev/ee160
: : does not fix this problem.
 
: : Looking throught the code, there where several assuptions made about
: : device names and where the LUN # would be.  
 
: : Does anyone have either nfswatch compiled for U.W. or another tool
: : that can snoop on what's going on with the NFS client and / or server
: : activity??
 
: You'd never get "Error 0" from a failed system call (such as trying to
: open the wrong file).  Somewhere perror() (or strerror()) is called under
: a condition where the failure either was not due to a failed system call,
: or where errno was reset to 0 before the call to perror().

Let's get the light ;-) 

This evening I've played with tcpdump, libpcap 0.0 and nfswatch .. My
system is Unixware 1.1.2, with an WD driven ethernet card.
Compiling libpcap 0.0 and tcpdump (all taken from ftp.novell.de, it's
important since in libpcap 0.0 there is a special pcap-uw.c file :
/*
 * Pcap interface for SVR4.2 (including UnixWare [12].*).
 *
 * Copyright Novell Inc., 1994.
 */
)
Then if you compile and run nfswatch... with gdb ;-)... you see that
it does not use the same Service to get connected. nfswatch uses
DL_ATTACH_REQ request and wait for an DL_OK_ACK  ... but it get's an
DL_ERROR_ACK .. quite bad, isn't it ? What I've done is looking more
precisely at the message bloc :
error_ack = {
    dl_primitive = 5, 
    dl_error_primitive = 11,
    dl_errno = 18,
    dl_unix_errno = 0},

dl_errno = 18 = DL_NOTSUPPORTED  /* Primitive is known but not
					supported by DLS provider */ 

This explain why you get an "error 0", the message did arrive well,
but nfswatch does not check for DL_ERROR_ACK messages.. and does not
display dl_errno value.. 

In fact, all this does not help us getting nfswatch running... I know.
But since tcpdump/libpcap 0.0 works, we maybe could patch nfswatch...
Finally, to use the DLS provider, we have to do the same as in
libpcap, using the Bind service to associate a data link service
access point (DLSAP) with the stream... this way it should work. Maybe
I'll start patching nfswatch one of the days...


BTW, a good startpoint is the UW 1.0 (the real first one !) paper doc
named "STREAMS Modules and Drivers"... Don't know if it's still
available from somewhere... 

Arnaud.
--
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+
|   /| / Arnaud KOPP - Unix Admin. & Consult. - UnixWare - IP Providing	|
|  /-|<  Phone: +33 1 43 36 27 10  | Email : arnaud@calvacom.fr	  	|
| /  | \         WWW: http://www.calvacom.fr/ak24/			|
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+

-----------[000599][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 23:51:15 GMT
From:      raj@cup.hp.com (Rick Jones)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Fast Retransmit feature in TCP

Dan Lanciani (ddl@harvard.edu) wrote:
: It is possible to scale the threshold per connection, but not
: everybody does it.  Of course, if they do, then you likely *won't*
: see the tcprexmtthresh as a global!  

I would have though that the threshold was determined by virtue of the
liklihood of packet re-ordering on the net and such generating false
rtxs. If that is the case, wouldn't the "proper" threshold for a
network be a function of the network, and not the TCP window size? Or
am I missing something?

rick jones

-----------[000600][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 94 06:03:56 GMT
From:      ddl@harvard.edu (Dan Lanciani)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Fast Retransmit feature in TCP

In article <3b0khj$l03@hpindda.cup.hp.com>, raj@cup.hp.com (Rick Jones) writes:
| Dan Lanciani (ddl@harvard.edu) wrote:
| : It is possible to scale the threshold per connection, but not
| : everybody does it.  Of course, if they do, then you likely *won't*
| : see the tcprexmtthresh as a global!  
| 
| I would have though that the threshold was determined by virtue of the
| liklihood of packet re-ordering on the net and such generating false
| rtxs. If that is the case, wouldn't the "proper" threshold for a
| network be a function of the network, and not the TCP window size? Or
| am I missing something?

Possibly we are talking about different things.  The idea of fast
retransmit is to count the number of duplicate acks (that's the
threshold in question) as a clue to a lost packet.  As a very simple
example (and ignoring all sorts of things), let's say you send five
sequential segments and receive four identical acks (= three dups)
for the first segment.  This is a good hint that the first segment
was received, the second was lost, and the next three were received.
Resending the second segment will get everything moving again and
that's what the algorithm tries to do.  Perhaps the name of that
global is misleading; it should be tcpdupackthresh...

In any case, the number of duplicate acks you will see in these
situations is usually bounded by one less than the number of segments
that will fit in a window.  Machines that offered a very small
window (e.g., because they had a 3c501) never hit the threshold.
I suppose you could use a static threshold of one, but I think
that caused other undesirable behavior. :)

				Dan Lanciani
				ddl@harvard.*

-----------[000601][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      23 Nov 1994 12:47:03 +1100
From:      jbell@ga.com.au (John Bell)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Help Required on Apple/Mac TCP/IP Options

Hi All,
	I've been asked to supply some options for Apple Computers to connect
to Unix hosts via telnet, but have no Apple experience.
	What we want to do is to connect a network of Apple computers which
use AppleTalk/AppleShare to a Unix host (probably a UnixWare PC) so as to
allow telnet sessions with vt100 terminal emulation.  The AppleTalk network
has Ethernet as its physical/data-link layer as I understand it.  The people
concerned would prefer a low cost option if possible.
	If you have any suggestions as to how to achieve this please reply
to me by Email.

Thanks in Advance,

-- 
jbell@ga.com.au (John Bell, General Automation, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA)
                 ph. (+61)-(3)-522-2211
                 fax (+61)-(3)-510-8677

-----------[000602][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 08:03:52 GMT
From:      antonis@intranet.gr (Antonis Kyriazis)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Bones Designer


Does one know the fax no. of this company? I want to get price
information about it...

thank you

+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
|     Antonis Kyriazis                                              |
| Networks & Communications       e-mail: antonis@intranet.gr       |
| INTRACOM sa                                                       |
| 19.5 km Marcopoulo Ave.          fax:   +30-1- 68 60 106          |
| Peania 190 02                                                     |
| GREECE                          phone:  +30-1- 68 60 122          |
| The expressed opinions are of my own     + - MACEDONIA IS GREEK - +
+-------------------------------------------------------------------+


-----------[000603][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 16:52:02 -0500
From:      ldore@gandalf.ca (Luc Dore)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Printing via WAN:Newbie

smartin@cpisun3.navsea.navy.mil (Sam Martin) writes:

>My question? The SYTEK bridges, what do they care about an Ethernet address?
>If the tcpip address is correct, and I'm confident of that, what does the 12
>byte NIC address have to do eith any of this?

	Bridges work on level two of the ISO layer list, that means that
they do not even look at IP adresses.  They only work with hardware (read NIC)
adresses.  Now, keep in mind that the hardware address is included into the
packet (along with the IP address).  

	Before the bridge goes on to forward (or filter) frames, it goes into
a "learning" mode; what that means is that the bridge listens to everyone on 
both sides of it's interfaces, and then, after the leaning is done the bridge
goes into "forwarding mode".

	Just for your information, if you want a device that works with IP 
addresses instead of hardware, you need a router.  Those devices work on layer 
3 of the ISO layer list.

 
-- 
Luc Dore					| There is no relation between
Gandalf Data Ltd. (Montreal, Quebec)		| my employer and this message.
ldore@gandalf.ca - 72677.2037@compuserve.com	|------------------------------
Hopfen und Malz Gott Erhalts !

-----------[000604][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 24 Nov 1994 08:44:21 GMT
From:      mike@novell.co.uk (Mike Convey)
To:        comp.unix.unixware,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: nfswatch binary for U.W.??

In article <3b0js6$2t1@midgard.calvacom.fr>,
Arnaud KOPP <arnaud@asgard.calvacom.fr> wrote:
>dl_errno = 18 = DL_NOTSUPPORTED  /* Primitive is known but not
>					supported by DLS provider */ 
>
>This explain why you get an "error 0", the message did arrive well,
>but nfswatch does not check for DL_ERROR_ACK messages.. and does not
>display dl_errno value.. 
>
>In fact, all this does not help us getting nfswatch running... I know.
>But since tcpdump/libpcap 0.0 works, we maybe could patch nfswatch...

Although I haven't looked at nfswatch, I imagine it does the same DLPI calls
as the Solaris version of libpcap.  As you have found, UnixWare's ethernet
drivers don't support that method.  I'd recommend porting nfswatch to use 
libpcap...

Mike

-----------[000605][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 24 Nov 1994 08:26:05 UNDEFINED
From:      pebo@cinet.no (Per Boe)
To:        comp.protocols.nfs,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ip broadcast towards udp discard port, why?

In article <3avkfd$l8n@uxmain.nlr.nl> graat@uxfiles.nlr.nl (graat j.w.) writes:
>From: graat@uxfiles.nlr.nl (graat j.w.)
>Subject: ip broadcast towards udp discard port, why?
>Date: 23 Nov 1994 14:43:57 GMT
>Summary: what is the use of a broadcast towards a discard port
>Keywords: discard nfs pcnfs ip udp tcp-ip
 
>Hi everyone,
 
>during network analyses I found several packets broadcasted by pc
>machines to the standard udp discard port (port 9). Does anybody have
>any idea what this is used for? I cannot think of any reason for doing
>this.
 
>Source address:      <host ip address>
>       port:         9
>Destination address: 255.255.255.255
>            port:    9

PC-NFS Serial number is broadcasted on udp port 9.




**************************************************************
* Per Boe, Technical Support, Email: pebo@cinet.no           *
* X400: G=per; S=boe; O=cinet oslo; P=cinet; A=telemax; C=no *
* Cinet A/S, Rolf Wickstroems Vei 15, N-0409 Oslo, Norway    *
* Phone: + 47 22 097000,  Fax  : + 47 22 097070              *
**************************************************************

-----------[000606][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 24 Nov 94 20:54:11 PDT
From:      rputnam@cybersys.mercy.org
To:        vmsnet.infosystems.gopher,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.infosystems,alt.gopher
Subject:   Resolve Host Problem (IP Adrses)


I'm using Chameleon 4.01 for Windows and am having a problem with domain 
names.  I can't enter domain names in any of the programs (gopher, 
telnet, FTP, etc...) and get it to work.  For some reason it can't find 
the IP addresses when I put in the domain name.  This has been very 
troublesome for me since I have a book of domain names -- but no IP 
addresses!  Can anyone help me with this problem?  Here are the error 
messages I get in each of the utilities for Chameleon:

Telnet: "Unable to resolve host"

Gopher: "Can't resolve host 'gopher.micro.umn.edu'. Retry the operation"

FTP: "Failed to connect to remote host: "cybersys.mercy.org"."

------------------------------------------------------------------------
I have used many different domains that I know are good and none have 
worked.  I can easily connect to these same places using the IP 
addresses.  Thank you for your help, Sincerly, R. Putnam.
*** Please E-mail me at: rputnam@cybersys.mercy.org         ***
***               ...or: scott.putnam@fatal.com             ***

PS: If I somehow posted this in a newsgroup it is inappropriate for 
please forgive the oversight. I am anxious to solve the problem and was 
unable to first survey the newgroups.  If you have a suggestion for a 
better place to find my answer by all means please let me know! Thanks 
again.

-----------[000607][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 24 Nov 1994 14:39:44 GMT
From:      gluijten@dcakl.knoware.nl (G.C.J.M. Luijten)
To:        alt.sys.sun,comp.sys.sun.misc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Using CSLIP-2.7 with SunOS 4.1.3

Hi there,

I'm trying to use cslip-2.7 instead off the current slip-4.0 on my 
SUN-station (SunOS 4.1.3, working with a hayes-compatible modem. I thought 
this step (going to use cslip-2.7) was easy. 

For installing cslip I did the following:
- Compiling the kernel after doing the changes to a various 
  config/header-files.
- Build and install the applications: sliplogin, slstats, 
  slinfo, myetheraddr  and tip.
- Build tools/ifconfig and installed as ifconfig.slip
- cp slip.hosts,slip.login and slip.logout to /etc
- Edit slip.hosts and commented out the 'route-line' in sliplogin as 
  described in the readme-file.
- Installed script-files from the tip-directory
- Edit /etc/remote.  /etc/remote has the following lines:
       dial19200|Telebit attributes:\
            :dv=/dev/cua1:br#19200:nt:fc:at=hayes:du:
       UNIX|telebit|Telebit dial-out to another Unix system:\
            :el=^U^C^R^O^D^S^Q@:ie=#%$:oe=^D:tc=dial19200:
       dial-foo:\
            :pn=dt5551212:tc=telebit:
       foo|slip-foo:\
            :st=slip:ls=/etc/login.script.unix S%h {passwd}:\
            :cc=/etc/sliplogin Sfoo:tc=dial-foo:
- made a couple off entries in passwd for slip, with as the login shell 
  /etc/sliplogin
- mv /dev/ttyb /dev/ttyd0
  (why moving ?)
- mknod /dev/cua1 c 12 129
- chmod 666 /dev/cua1
- in /etc/ttytab: ttyd0 "/usr/etc/getty D192000"  dialup  on secure
- in /etc/gettytab for D19200:
     F|D19200|Fast-Dial-19200:\
         :nx=D19200:fd@:tc=19200-baud:


The problems I have, are:
- when "tip foo" tip response with "can't synchronize with hayes"
  and no automatic dialing. 
- after 'tip cua' and dialing the number with hayes-commands, I tried 
  'sliplogin Sfoo'. The result was that the terminal comes with garbage.

How can I solve these problems ?
Why does tip skip the "pn:dt5551212" field ?
Isn't possible like with slip-4.0 doing a "sliplogin dest-ip-addr 
local-ip-addr mask < /dev/cua1" to make a slip to my service-provider ?

Greetings, Ger Luijten

-----------[000608][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 13:07:51 +0100
From:      robjan@rabo.nl (Rob Janssen)
To:        comp.protocols.nfs,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: ip broadcast towards udp discard port, why?

In <3avkfd$l8n@uxmain.nlr.nl> graat@uxfiles.nlr.nl (graat j.w.) writes:

>Hi everyone,
 
>during network analyses I found several packets broadcasted by pc
>machines to the standard udp discard port (port 9). Does anybody have
>any idea what this is used for? I cannot think of any reason for doing
>this.
 
>Source address:      <host ip address>
>       port:         9
>Destination address: 255.255.255.255
>            port:    9
 
>The data in the packets is 14 bytes long and starts with 'PC-NFS'
>followed by eight ascii characters (looks like a hexadecimal string).
>My guess is it has something to do with pc-nfs, but what?

It is a broadcast of the serial number of the software.  When it is
picked up by another copy having the same serial number, well...

Rob

-----------[000609][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 14:57:30 GMT
From:      petitkri@rsd.bel.alcatel.be (Kris Petit)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   MTP (RFC1301) status

A few months ago a message was posted (I hope it was this newsgroup) for information concerning MTP. The answer was that this is a research item at the Universities of 
Berlin and Bremen. 

What is the status of this activity and does somebody have additional information on this subject (field experiences, performances)?

All information is welcome. Reply via this newsgroup or throug e-mail
(petitkri@rsd.bel.alcatel.be)

Thanks,

Kris Petit



-----------[000610][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 24 Nov 1994 15:11:06 GMT
From:      orel@lpuds.oea.ihep.su (Oleg Orel)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sources.d
Subject:   Re: New archive site for NcFTP.

Archive site of utility best than ncftp - uftp is 
	ftp.oea.ihep.su:/libs/libftp-2.0.zip 

This soft have line edit, aliases, reconnection, batch modes,
 moltiframe, archie support, shell line syntax ( such as ';' '<' '>' $1 ...)

Best ragards, 
Oleg Orel


--
ˆ9

-----------[000611][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 24 Nov 1994 15:12:20 GMT
From:      orel@lpuds.oea.ihep.su (Oleg Orel)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Simple FTP C code

guargua@radar.iet.unipi.it wrote:
: I'm looking for simple example of FTP code in C language.
: Where could I find it?
: Tanks for any pointers.
 
: Giacomo Guarguaglini

Try use libftp. 

	ftp.oea.ihep.su:/lib/libftp/...


--
ˆ9

-----------[000612][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 15:47:37 GMT
From:      phrrngtn@dcs.st-andrews.ac.uk (Paul J. J. Harrington)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Multicast sockets with Perl under 4.1.3?

[ sorry to those who may have seen a longer version of this on
comp.lang.perl, I think that multicasting perl progs could be
particularly useful]


Has anyone got any working perl fragments which use mcast?

All my efforts so far with setsockopt for IP_ADD_MEMBERSHIP have
failed with an EBADF from perl.


pjjH




--
Paul Harrington, phrrngtn@dcs.st-andrews.ac.uk  	 +44 1334 463261
Division of Computer Science, St Andrews University, Scotland KY16 9SS

-----------[000613][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 25 Nov 94 00:50:00 -0500
From:      ross.boulton@onlinesys.com (Ross Boulton)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   :Review: Internet Access CDROM

                              A REVIEW OF
                            EMERALD SOFTWARE
                INTERNET ACCESS TO THE INFORMATION HIGHWAY
                         NEW VERSION FOR 1995

                            BY ROSS BOULTON



The disk is divided into two main sections, a guide book of
internet and an internet file library.  Although these files
are all freely available on internet, they are conveniently
organized and described on a CDROM.

THE GUIDE BOOK:     \guide\setup.exe
The guide book is a windows driven file searching and viewing
interface with an internet glossary, file listing of CDROM,
and other general internet documents.


THE FILE LIBRARY:  c:\inet.bat (created by install.com)
The file library is jam packed with networking/communication
software, and RFT documents.  The DOS user interface, "CDINDX"
makes finding these files easy and fast.  Having the files
accessible from CDROM also is more convenient than "surfing the
net".   Most of the files are zipped and with the click of a mouse
the software unzips them to your hard disk.

Below is a tree structure of the disk.
Directory PATH listing for Volume IAIH_2
E:.
+---ARCTOOLS       ARCHIVING UTILITIES (228 zipped files)
+---CDIDX          FILE SEARCHING AND VIEWING PROGRAM
|   \---CS
|       \---PIC
 +---GCOMM          THOUSANDS OF COMMUNICATION PROGRAMS
|   +---0_9        SORTED AND SPLIT BY FIRST LETTER OF
|   +---A          THE FILE NAME.  Shareware/Freeware
|   +---B
|   +---C
|   +---D
|   +---E
|   +---F
|   +---G
|   +---H
|   +---I
|   +---J
|   +---K
|   +---L
|   +---M
|   +---N
|   +---O
|   +---P
|   +---Q
|   +---R
|   +---S
|   +---T
|   +---U
|   +---V
|   +---W
|   +---X
|   +---Y
|   \---Z
+---GUIDE          GENERAL INFORMATION FILES NOT ZIPPED
+---INETINFO
+---INTERNET
|   +---INFORMAT
|   |   +---COMP   GENERAL INTERNET FILE ZIPPED (245 files)
|   |   +---FAQ1   FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION FILES
|   |   \---TXT1   GENERAL INTERNET FILES UNZIPPED
|   +---RFC1       REQUEST FOR COMMENTS FILES
|   +---RFC2
|   +---RFC3
|   +---RFC4
|   +---RFC5
|   \---SOFTWARE
|       +---CELLO     CELLO SOFTWARE
|       +---MOSAIC    MOSAIC SOFTWARE
|       \---TELNET    NCSA TELNET SOFTWARE
 +---NETWORK
|   +---1_M           NETWORKING PROGRAMS AND INFO
|   \---N_Z              "          "      "    "
+---VIRUS             VIRUS PROTECTION SOFTWARE
\---WINRAMP           WINRAMP SOFTWARE


PROBLEMS:
The CDROM comes with no manual, but is easy enough to figure
out.  The batch file to start the software has an annoying
graphic logo screen which slows the program startup.  I
quickly REM'd that command out.  One bug was found.  The
inet.bat looks for a file that is not there.  The result is,
it tells you that the CDROM is not installed.  Below is the
offending file with my fixes.

INET.BAT
.
.
REM ***************************
REM note from reviewer
REM rem the next to lines to bypass the slow Emerald LOGO
REM ***************************
REM if exist E:\cdidx\cs\pic\emerald2.pcx E:\cdidx\cs\cshow
E:\cdidx\cs\pic\emerald2.pcx+x
REM E:\cdidx\sleep 4
.
.
REM ***********************************
REM note from reviewer
REM E:\cdidx\cdidx.bdg is not there
REM ***********************************
REM if not exist E:\cdidx\cdidx.dbg cls
REM if not exist E:\cdidx\cdidx.dbg echo.
REM if not exist E:\cdidx\cdidx.dbg echo.
REM if not exist E:\cdidx\cdidx.dbg echo You must have the wrong
disc in E:
REM if not exist E:\cdidx\cdidx.dbg goto end

Conclusion:
The CDROM is a real time saver and is packed with excellent
information & products.  I recommend it highly for the
beginner to the seasoned net user.


How do I get a copy?:
I have some copies of this CDROM and will send you a one:

$26 US       if shipped to Unitied States
$31 Canadian if shipped in Canada (Ontario residents +8% pst)
$36 US       if shipped outside North America
             (all prices include shipping)

To get it fast, pre-order by email, then send cheque/money order payable
to: Ontario Systems
    15 Winship Close
    London, Ontario
    Canada
    N6C 5M7

I will have one ready for shipping as soon as the cheque is
received.

ross.boulton@onlinesys.com

-----------[000614][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Thu, 24 Nov 1994 16:50:19 GMT
From:      art@acc.com (Art Berggreen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: sendto's maximum size

In article <3ati07$adn@noao.edu> rstevens@noao.edu (W. Richard Stevens) writes:
>> Why can't I send broadcast UDP datagrams of the same length that point to
>> point datagrams? 
>> I understand that the IP layer is responsible for fragmenting UDP datagrams
>> when their length exceed the MTU of the LAN. This works well for point to point
>> datagrams, but not for broadcasting.
>> I use SunOS4.1.3 and ethernet. The MTU is 1500, and the maximum size of the messages
>> that I can broadcast is 1472.
>> Why fragmenting is not performed by IP? Has anyone an idea?
>> It doesn't seem logical to me.
>
>This appears to have been an implementation decisions made long ago in
>the BSD TCP/IP code, that most vendors just copy.  There's no technical
>reason that a UDP datagram destined for a broadcast address cannot be
>fragmented--it's a policy decision that broadcasting puts enough of a
>load on the network already, so why make it worse by multiplying it by N.
>These days, you should consider multicasting instead of broadcasting.

Also, every fragmented broadcast creates reassembly chains in all the
receivers.  If any of the fragments are lost on the wire or by the
receiver, the missing pieces are not nearly as likely to get retransmitted
as unicast traffic.  This causes the affected fragment chains to have
to time out.  This could be a significant consumption of resources
on machines that may not have wanted the broadcast anyway.

Art


-----------[000615][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 15:16:06 +0100
From:      robjan@rabo.nl (Rob Janssen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Simple FTP C code

In <3av2qo$b3f@serra.unipi.it> guargua@radar.iet.unipi.it writes:

>I'm looking for simple example of FTP code in C language.
>Where could I find it?

Try one of the many sites that have the Linux operating system, or
one of the CD-ROMs that contain it.   (be sure you buy a distribution
that includes source, not just binaries)

The CD-ROMs are in ISO9660 format and can be read on most other systems.

Rob

-----------[000616][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 15:33:38 +0100
From:      robjan@rabo.nl (Rob Janssen)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Faking out a router for ftp mirrors?

In <NELSON.94Nov23103320@crynwr.crynwr.com> nelson@crynwr.crynwr.com (Russell Nelson) writes:

>We've all seen how various popular ftp sites (ftp.uu.net, wuarchive,
>SimTel, SunSite) have mirrors in various places.  The problem, of
>course, is deciding which mirror to use.  Well, I was wondering if it
>might not be possible to have all the SimTel (e.g.) mirrors use the
>same IP address, and change the routing depending on where you are.
>For example, PSI could put a SimTel mirror on their backbone, AlterNet
>on theirs, etc., and set a route to their own mirror.
 
>Obviously the host would have to have its own real IP address for the
>net it was actually on, otherwise it wouldn't be able to do the
>mirroring that lets it keep its files updated.  The IP stack on the
>mirror host would have to support IP address aliasing, as does BSD/OS
>and Linux.  That's not the hard part.  The hard part is getting the
>routing correct so that multiple parts of the Internet can have
>different routes to the same IP address.

I think it has been proposed before.  If I remember right, the idea was
to use a new class of addresses (class E?) that would refer to "services"
instead of machines, and the network itself would choose what machine you
will get for that service by setting the correct route.

When done that way, it would be tricky to have automatic changeover when
a machine fails.  (suddenly your TCP session is with another machine, that
is not going to work.  you would have to restart the transfer.  when that
happens a lot you will not be pleased...)

It would also need special support for this class of addresses, like
the support for multicasting (class D).

Another possibility, maybe more attractive, is to solve this in the
nameserver.  You ask for "simtel-mirror" and you get the (real) IP address
of the nearest mirror returned.  That would only be used to translate
the IP address once per connection and would not have the above problem.

As a more general approach to the problem, it would be even better to
avoid mirroring.
Wouldn't it be nice if there are 'FTP servers' all over the world, that
provide some kind of 'universal file repository' where the different
subdirectories hold things like the SimTel files.  They all show you all
the files they have available combined, and you can get any file from
the local server as if it is on disk there.
Then, each server only mirrors the directory structure and can cache
files that are often requested.  When you request a file that is not
locally available, the server knows where to get it most efficiently
(the root site of the file or a nearby server that already has a copy)
and potentially keeps it cached for the next person that wants it.

An approach like this could probably reduce the traffic induced by FTP
transfers a lot, especially if the synchronizing protocol used between
the servers works so well that nobody is tempted to look at the root
site anymore.
The cache management algorithms can also reduce diskspace requirements
at each server (there is no need to have enough space to hold the entire
contents of another site, as is the case when you are mirroring a site).
Disk space requirement becomes more a function of usage characteristics
of the local server than of the number of files it has to offer.

Of course this approach introduces the need for a synchronization protocol
between the servers, and a directory structure that everyone is prepared
to live with (something like the newsgroups are now)

Has this ever been studied more in depth?

Rob

-----------[000617][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 17:29:26 GMT
From:      gfleming@cml.com (Gordon Fleming)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Address already in use message

Mario Klebsch DG1AM (mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de) wrote:
: adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow) writes:
 
: >In article <denny.785194315@hostfax>,
: >                Tom Denny <denny@hostfax.aifp.com> wrote:
 
: >>We have a concurrent server application in TCP/IP which binds to an address
: >>on a  well known port number.  When the application is killed, and then
: >>restarted, bind fails with the message "Address already in use".  We then
: >>either have to restart the machine or wait for 10-15 minutes before
: >>restarting the application.  Does anyone have any idea what might be
: >>causing this? 
: >>
 
: >Your application is probably forgetting to close the listen() socket as
: >well as accept()ed sockets, or is just doing a shutdown on it.
 
: Does't the kernel close all open descriptors, when the process exites?
: This is what I learned about UNIX. Do sockets behave different ?
 
: Mario
: --
: Mario Klebsch, DG1AM, mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de		+49 531 / 391 - 7457
: Institut fuer Robotik und Prozessinformatik der TU Braunschweig
: Hamburger Strasse 267, 38114 Braunschweig, Germany

I thought all sockets had a linger time in which they are kept open to 
avoid any astray data that might still be sent even after the application 
using the previous socket has terminated.  Is this not the case?


 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
 : ComputerLink Online Inc.            Realms of Despair!            :
 : (416)233-5410                       telnet mud.compulink.com 4000 :
 : 106 lines, 300-28,800 bps           endless medieval enjoyment!   :
 :                                                                   :
 : Join our International Teleconference --> chat.compulink.com 9000 :
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------[000618][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 18:58:20 GMT
From:      ralphs@halcyon.halcyon.com (Ralph Sims)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sources.d
Subject:   Re: New archive site for NcFTP.

orel@lpuds.oea.ihep.su (Oleg Orel) writes:

>Archive site of utility best than ncftp - uftp is 
>	ftp.oea.ihep.su:/libs/libftp-2.0.zip 

Anyone on the US side of the pond have this?  The connection
to the host keeps dropping and the host is now unreachable.
Also, the file is ftp.oea.ihep.su:/libs/libftp/libftp-2.0.zip.
--

  Northwest NEXUS, Inc. takes Internet OUT of the box!
  info@nwnexus.wa.com, finger info@halcyon.com, or:
  http://www.halcyon.com / +1 206 455 3505 voice

-----------[000619][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 25 Nov 1994 00:28:21 GMT
From:      jim@reptiles.org (Jim Mercer)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: TCP-IP on IBM AS/400

In article <3atqic$1gd@panix.com>, Izzy Schiller <izzy@panix.com> wrote:
>Does anyone have experience of using TCP-IP on the IBM AS/400 
>minicomputer. We are trying to connect our AS/400 to Inetenet via the new 
>TCP-IP and hope someone tried this before us. 
>
>Please let me know here or email izzy@panix.com

we have an AS/400 connected to the 'net.

here are some of my critiques (relevant to OS/400 V2R3)

SMTP is hopeless.  the machine will receive email, but good luck in
trying to send email.  the user interfaces do not really allow
you to specify domains (at least under OV/400)

routing is somewhat weak, watch those netmasks and such.
also watch out if you are subnetting a B class.

ftp is limited to transfers of 16,000,000 bytes, exactly.

limited to 160 "sessions", telnet, ftp, smtp, etc.
(i think each attached telnet is 2 sessions, one in, one out)

other than that, the machine is relatively happy to be connected.

oh, if you have novell on the same segment, you may want to make sure
that everything is using ethernet_2 frames, and nothing uses
"novell 802.3" frames.  the 400 thinks they are erroneous packets
and sends a message to the system console indicating a bad packet.

i'd be interested in discussing AS/400 and TCP/IP with anyone else interested.



-- 
[ Jim Mercer                 jim@reptiles.org              +1 416 506-0654 ]
[          Reptilian Research -- Longer Life through Colder Blood          ]
[   Never, ever forget to replace the toiletseat after use!!! A wet        ]
[   chinchilla is a very funny and pathetic sight.   -- alt.chinchilla     ]

-----------[000620][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 01:46:17 GMT
From:      camirand@trance.helix.net (Eric Camirand)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   How to talk TCP to an FTP site?

Subject: How to talk TCP to an FTP site?
Newsgroups: comp.os.ms-windows.networking.tcp-ip
Summary: 
Keywords: 

I succeed to get connected to an ftp server (port 21). But I have no
clue on what command to send in order to login, change dir and get
a file...

What type of litterature should I look for? Is there any on the NET?

I'm talking through Visual Basic, Winsock and SLIP connection and I see the 
server response waiting for me to say something but what....??????

Thanks

Eric


--
      |///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////|
      |     ____         Cinax Designs Inc.                       |
      |    /    n        -------------------                      |
      |   | inax          Eric Camirand, Project Engineer         |
      |    \____x         Box 93581, Nelson Park PO               |
      |                   Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6E 4L7        |
      |                                                           |
      |    Tel.: (604) 895-9053        Fax.: (604) 939-2510       |
      |    Internet: cinax@helix.net                              |
     /)                               Cinax,                      (\
    / )                                     Virtually 'On Reel' ! ( \
<\ ( (|///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////|) ) 
 \(((\ \)  /,)                                              / )  / //)))
  \\\\\ \_/ /                                               \ \_/ /////
   \       /                                                 \       /
    \     /                                                   \     /
   |-     -|                                                 |-     -|
   |__TM___|                                                 |_______|


-----------[000621][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 25 Nov 94 10:20:53 PST
From:      kcarpenter@mindlink.bc.ca (Ken Carpenter)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Looking for IP, IPX, DIX Standards Documents

I am looking for the standards documents for the IP, and IPX protocols,
as well the DIX (Digital, Intel, Xerox) Ethernet standard.

Are these documents available on the net?  Or will I have to order them
from IEEE or other standards organization?

Thanks in advance,


Ken Carpenter
Network Group
Research & Devlepment
Delta Controls Inc.



-----------[000622][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 02:40:48 GMT
From:      tagoldth@camtwh.eric.on.ca
To:        alt.sys.sun,comp.sys.sun.misc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Using CSLIP-2.7 with SunOS 4.1.3

In article <gluijten.27.0009A9DA@dcakl.knoware.nl> gluijten@dcakl.knoware.nl (G.C.J.M. Luijten) writes:
>Hi there,
>
>I'm trying to use cslip-2.7 instead off the current slip-4.0 on my 
>SUN-station (SunOS 4.1.3, working with a hayes-compatible modem. I thought 
>this step (going to use cslip-2.7) was easy. 
>
>For installing cslip I did the following:

<much deleted for brevity>

The cslip2.7 package is great, with the exception of the dialer (a tip/cu
replacement) and the login.  Both are very cumbersome and difficult to
get working just right.  The only things that were needed (for me anyway)
from the package were the kernel sources and slattach.  I wrote two c
programs to act as a dialer and login shell which exec slattach, and
it made life very simple.  You may consider doing the same.  This way, you
can also get features like auto-redial (line drops are a pain when multiple
connections are going) etc.  I may consider turning what I wrote into a
small package for people to use, provided there is sufficient request for
it.

Tom


-----------[000623][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 25 Nov 1994 03:23:37 GMT
From:      Mark Davidson <mrdavids@descartes.uwaterloo.ca>
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: PC as nameserver?

> Hi out there,
> 
> is there any program to run a PC as nameserver (dos wor windows)?
> 
> thanks, 
> 
> -Stephan

For that matter has anyone every setup a Windows NT Workstation
system as a nameserver?  Or perhaps NT Server.  I would be 
interested in knowing.  Also, has anyone every setup an NT Workstation
that is sitting on a LAN using TCP/IP and is connected to another 
network using RAS every been able to get routing from the internal
netowrk to the connected network.  I have been trying and haven't had
a lot of luck.  So far the only thing I could think of doing was
make PPP use a set IP address, and have the RAS Host machine set its
default gateway to the RAS IP address, and then have other machines
on the network set their default gateway to the RAS Host IP address.

Thanks.

P.S.  Please post using email, since I dont' read this group to often.

-----------[000624][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      24 Nov 1994 10:14:59 +1030
From:      simon@wraith.internode.com.au (Simon Hackett)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.unix.programmer
Subject:   Re: Address already in use message

mkl@rob.cs.tu-bs.de (Mario Klebsch DG1AM) writes:

>adam@comptech.demon.co.uk (Adam Goodfellow) writes:


>>>We have a concurrent server application in TCP/IP which binds to an address
>>>on a  well known port number.  When the application is killed, and then
>>>restarted, bind fails with the message "Address already in use".  We then
>>>either have to restart the machine or wait for 10-15 minutes before
>>>restarting the application.  Does anyone have any idea what might be
>>>causing this? 
>>>
 
>>Your application is probably forgetting to close the listen() socket as
>>well as accept()ed sockets, or is just doing a shutdown on it.
 
>Does't the kernel close all open descriptors, when the process exites?
>This is what I learned about UNIX. Do sockets behave different ?

set the socket option "SO_REUSEADDR" (or something spelt very similarly)
on the socket, this should make that "problem" disappear.

Simon
-- 
      Simon Hackett,  Internode Systems Pty Ltd, Adelaide, Australia
      Email:  simon@internode.com.au       URL:  http://www.internode.com.au
      Phone:  +61 8 373 1020               Fax:  +61 8 373 4911
      "My other car is a glider ... SF25-C MotorFalke ... VH-FQW"

-----------[000625][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 25 Nov 1994 06:31:17 GMT
From:      static@caprica.com (Static/riskin/stolarz)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   SLIP for SPARC

anybody got it precompiled?

static@caprica.com
damien@static.com
stolarz@seas.ucla.edu


-----------[000626][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 07:45:35 GMT
From:      petitkri@rsd.bel.acatel.be (Kris Petit)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   MTP (RFC1301) status


A few months ago a message was posted (I hope it was this newsgroup) for information concerning MTP. The answer was that this is a research item at the Universities of 
Berlin and Bremen. 
 
What is the status of this activity and does somebody have additional information on this subject (field experiences, performances)?
 
All information is welcome. Reply via this newsgroup or through e-mail
(petitkri@rsd.be.alcatel.be 
 
Thanks,
 
Kris Petit

PS: I had a few problems with my newstool, sorry for the inconvenience if you received 
this mail more than once.


-----------[000627][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 08:05:29 GMT
From:      petitkri@rsd.bel.alcatel.be (Kris Petit)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   TCP via VSAT

Related to the use of TCP across VSAT links, I have the following question:

RFC1106 (TCP Big window and NAK options) contains some performance measurements
for these proposed enhancements across a satellite link.

Are similar performance figures available for RFC1323 (TCP Extensions for High Performance)?

Regards,

Kris Petit



-----------[000628][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 09:17:24 GMT
From:      p00ns00@emerald.yonsei.ac.kr (Park JungIl)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Question : x-kernel programming..

I am sorry. I don't know where I ask this. So I write it here.

I have the homework which is the x-kernel programming. But I don't
know the format of the x-kernel program. Do you have the example 
source code? I can't find the text book about the format of the 
x-kernel program.

If you have the example source codes, please posting them to me.

my e-mail address is p00ns00@emerald.yonsei.ac.kr

Thank you.

-----------[000629][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 09:36:48 GMT
From:      mh@tkemi.klb.dth.dk (Michael Hjorth)
To:        vmsnet.infosystems.gopher,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.os.ms-windows.apps.comm,comp.infosystems,alt.gopher
Subject:   Re: Resolve Host Problem (IP Adrses)

rputnam@cybersys.mercy.org wrote:

: I'm using Chameleon 4.01 for Windows and am having a problem with domain 
: names.  I can't enter domain names in any of the programs (gopher, 
: telnet, FTP, etc...) and get it to work.  For some reason it can't find 
: the IP addresses when I put in the domain name.  This has been very 
: troublesome for me since I have a book of domain names -- but no IP 
: addresses!  Can anyone help me with this problem?  Here are the error 
: messages I get in each of the utilities for Chameleon:
 
: Telnet: "Unable to resolve host"
 
: Gopher: "Can't resolve host 'gopher.micro.umn.edu'. Retry the operation"
 
: FTP: "Failed to connect to remote host: "cybersys.mercy.org"."
 
: ------------------------------------------------------------------------
: I have used many different domains that I know are good and none have 
: worked.  I can easily connect to these same places using the IP 
: addresses.  Thank you for your help, Sincerly, R. Putnam.
: *** Please E-mail me at: rputnam@cybersys.mercy.org         ***
: ***               ...or: scott.putnam@fatal.com             ***
 
: PS: If I somehow posted this in a newsgroup it is inappropriate for 
: please forgive the oversight. I am anxious to solve the problem and was 
: unable to first survey the newgroups.  If you have a suggestion for a 
: better place to find my answer by all means please let me know! Thanks 
: again.

Well, vmsnet.infosystems.gopher is a VMS news group, so it is not the 
best choice!

However, the problem seems to be that you haven't configured your
TCP/IP correct. In order to resolve hostnames you need access to
a nameserver, which translates the hostname to the IP addresses.
Talk to tour network administrator to find the IP address of a
nameserver and configure it into your system.
Check you documentation to find out how to configure a name server
for your network program.

--

+---------------------------------+---------------------+------------------+
| Michael Hjorth                  | mh@tkemi.klb.dth.dk |        \/        |
| Chemistry Department B          |                     |    _  o  o  _    |
| Technical University of Denmark | +45 42881777        |    -   /\   -    |
| DK-2800 Lyngby                  | ext. 2026           |      \____/      |
| Denmark                         |                     |        /\        |
 +---------------------------------+---------------------+------------------+

-----------[000630][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 09:51:24 GMT
From:      yd@iacorp.fr (Yves DEBIZET)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip,comp.sys.sun.misc
Subject:   INETD and wait/nowait status


Why do receive a "connect(): Connection refused" for a program installed
with a "wait" status in the inetd.conf file.

The console also displays:
"inetd[134]: service/tcp server failing (looping), service terminated"
Why would it loop ?

The same program (a very simple program which makes an echo) works well
with the "nowait" status. I wish to use the "wait" status in order to
serialize the activation of the program.

Working on SunOS 4.1.3C sun4m

Thanks for help !


-- 
Yves DEBIZET                               E-mail: yd@iacorp.fr
IA Corporation SA (IA/MC2)
4 Chemin de Malacher - ZIRST 4401
F38944 Meylan Cedex      (tel: +33 76.90.22.00, fax: +33 76.41.14.61)

-----------[000631][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 09:55:53 GMT
From:      landmark@cs.tu-berlin.de (Torsten Kerschat)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: MTP (RFC1301) status

petitkri@rsd.bel.alcatel.be (Kris Petit) writes:

>A few months ago a message was posted (I hope it was this newsgroup) for information concerning MTP. The answer was that this is a research item at the Universities of 
>Berlin and Bremen. 
 
>What is the status of this activity and does somebody have additional information on this subject (field experiences, performances)?
The first release of MTP-2 is now available via ftp server. The documentation of MTP,
the man pages and so on are still in progress, but nevertheless you'll find the
versions of them.
ftp-server:  ftp.cs.tu-berlin.de 
directory :  /home/ftp/pub/local/kbs/mtp/

torsten
-- 
Torsten Kerschat - Interdepartmental Research Center for Process Control
		   Technical University of Berlin (PRZ - Room HE 104)
Internet: torsten@prz.tu-berlin.d400.de / landmark@cs.tu-berlin.d400.de
Phone   : ++49 / (0)30 / 314 - 26822    Fax: ++49 / (0)30 / 314 - 21114

-----------[000632][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 25 Nov 1994 11:12:18 GMT
From:      iialan@iifeak.swan.ac.uk (Alan Cox)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Stupid telnet negotiation question...

In article <19941122.011136.41@comptech.demon.co.uk> adam@comptech.demon.co.uk writes:
>Is their a particularly nasty quirk in BSD 4.3 telnet derived telnet
>clients that agrivates this?
>
>The telnet on my machine suffers from this as well apparently - only to
>linux boxes though, and this client is a port from the BSD 4.3 telnet I
>think...

Both the client and server are straight from BSD. 

Alan


-- 
  ..-----------,,----------------------------,,----------------------------,,
 // Alan Cox  //  iialan@www.linux.org.uk   //  GW4PTS@GB7SWN.#45.GBR.EU  //
 ``----------'`----------------------------'`----------------------------''

-----------[000633][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 12:14:52 GMT
From:      olah@cs.utwente.nl (Andras Olah)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: Fast Retransmit feature in TCP

In article <2359@sun3.IPSWITCH.COM>, ddl@harvard.edu (Dan Lanciani) writes:
|> In article <3b0khj$l03@hpindda.cup.hp.com>, raj@cup.hp.com (Rick Jones) writes:
|> | Dan Lanciani (ddl@harvard.edu) wrote:
|> | : It is possible to scale the threshold per connection, but not
|> | : everybody does it.  Of course, if they do, then you likely *won't*
|> | : see the tcprexmtthresh as a global!  
|> | 
|> | I would have though that the threshold was determined by virtue of the
|> | liklihood of packet re-ordering on the net and such generating false
|> | rtxs. If that is the case, wouldn't the "proper" threshold for a
|> | network be a function of the network, and not the TCP window size? Or
|> | am I missing something?
|> 
|> Possibly we are talking about different things.  The idea of fast
|> retransmit is to count the number of duplicate acks (that's the
|> threshold in question) as a clue to a lost packet.  As a very simple
|> example (and ignoring all sorts of things), let's say you send five
|> sequential segments and receive four identical acks (= three dups)
|> for the first segment.  This is a good hint that the first segment
|> was received, the second was lost, and the next three were received.
|> Resending the second segment will get everything moving again and
|> that's what the algorithm tries to do.  Perhaps the name of that
|> global is misleading; it should be tcpdupackthresh...
|> 
|> In any case, the number of duplicate acks you will see in these
|> situations is usually bounded by one less than the number of segments
|> that will fit in a window.  Machines that offered a very small
|> window (e.g., because they had a 3c501) never hit the threshold.
|> I suppose you could use a static threshold of one, but I think
|> that caused other undesirable behavior. :)

Dan,

I think Rick meant that you'll get duplicate acks in case of packet
reordering as well.  The role of tcprexmtthresh in this case is to
prevent Fast Retransmit, thus you don't want to have a too small
value for tcprexmtthresh if your path is likely to reorder.  On the
other hand, tcprexmtthresh should be less than the number of
segments that will fit in a window, as you pointed out.

-- 
 
  Andras Olah                    	olah@cs.utwente.nl

-----------[000634][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 25 Nov 1994 13:59:15
From:      fks@ftp.com  (Frances K. Selkirk)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   Re: PC as nameserver?

In article <a2312bb.70.003C5213@sunmail.lrz-muenchen.de> a2312bb@sunmail.lrz-muenchen.de (Stephan Hermelink) writes:

> is there any program to run a PC as nameserver (dos wor windows)?

Our PC/BIND is a DNS nameserver package for a dedicated DOS PC. It
can act as a primary or secondary master server, a caching-only
server, or a slave server, and can perform automatic zone transfers. 

For information on PC/BIND (or other FTP products) call Sales at
1-800-282-4387 or 508-685-300, write info@ftp.com, or look on our Web
server at http://www.ftp.com.

Enjoy,

--
Frances K. Selkirk                                        fks@ftp.com
FTP Software, Inc.        Technical Support            (800) 382-4FTP
---------------------------------------------------------------------
FTP server = ftp.ftp.com        BBS =508-659-6240  |  support@ftp.com
WWW server = http://www.ftp.com                    |  info@ftp.com


-----------[000635][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      Fri, 25 Nov 94 21:46:16 PDT
From:      rputnam@cybersys.mercy.org
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc,comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains,comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   DNS Setup - Help!


I cannot get my Chameleon to resolve hosts when I put in just the domain 
and I finally figured out it's because I don't have my Domain Name 
Server setup correctly.  Can anyone help me with this problem?  I don't 
know how to set it up correctly with Chameleon and I don't know what my 
DNS should be. If anyone can help it would be *REALLY* appreciated. 
Thanks! Here's my info:

* Running a PPP connection 
* Using Chameleon 4.01 for Windows
* Connecting (w/ PPP) to host: cybersys.mercy.org
* I'm connecting to the UNIX internet system (class C) at Mercy Hospital 
  where my account is.
* I call and connect to IP address: 198.94.168.1
* My terminal account is at:        198.94.168.2
* I am assigned at login IP subnet: 198.94.168.14

Does this information help? Can anyone tell me from this (or any other 
info. I can provide) what my DNS should be and how I should set it up? 
Thankyou VERY much for the help! Please E-Mail me at:

			rputnam@cybersys.mercy.org


-----------[000636][next][prev][last][first]----------------------------------------------------
Date:      25 Nov 1994 14:34:56 +0100
From:      teisa@beatles.cselt.stet.it (Claudio Teisa)
To:        comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject:   network processes

 It is very likely